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Do autistic people think differently about happiness?
Yes 22%  22%  [ 6 ]
No 11%  11%  [ 3 ]
There is a differce, but it's not significant 11%  11%  [ 3 ]
There are numerous differences, but some similarities too 19%  19%  [ 5 ]
I don't know 37%  37%  [ 10 ]
Total votes : 27

Joe90
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04 Jun 2011, 3:33 pm

Happiness depends on the individual, not what neurology they have.


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Sweetleaf
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04 Jun 2011, 3:34 pm

I don't know what that is. :?



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04 Jun 2011, 3:37 pm

Happiness, like all things, is relative. I don't think that any one person could ever live a happier life than another. Some people think that others are always happier than them. Well, how does that make sense if they are always happy? You can't just be happy all the time, you need something to be happy about. If you're already happy, how can you be any happier? It just doesn't make any sense.


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aghogday
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04 Jun 2011, 3:42 pm

In general I think people with Autism my find more happiness in their endeavors, whatever they may be, than in social relationships.

Research indicates that social connections are the #1 factor in happiness, no other factor really stands out. Not surprising really, since humans are social animals, and have needed to be connected to survive for thousands of years.

And, I don't think it is necessarily that people with Autism don't want to have social relationships, they need them to survive like everyone else does, they are just harder to come by, so our satisfaction may come more from endeavors than people, as a matter of circumstance.

Even when involved in happy relationships, I find myself driven to solitary pursuits; I crave the stimulation of the mind as a guide in life. But I am terribly lonely without people, for significant periods of time.



OJani
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04 Jun 2011, 4:06 pm

aghogday wrote:
In general I think people with Autism my find more happiness in their endeavors, whatever they may be, than in social relationships.

Research indicates that social connections are the #1 factor in happiness, no other factor really stands out. Not surprising really, since humans are social animals, and have needed to be connected to survive for thousands of years.

And, I don't think it is necessarily that people with Autism don't want to have social relationships, they need them to survive like everyone else does, they are just harder to come by, so our satisfaction may come more from endeavors than people, as a matter of circumstance.

Even when involved in happy relationships, I find myself driven to solitary pursuits; I crave the stimulation of the mind as a guide in life. But I am terribly lonely without people, for significant periods of time.

I think pretty much the way you write here. Perhaps, some would say social interactions are not that important, and I can relate to them, but being an extrovert to a certain degree, I strive for interactions too.

Now, if you'll excuse me, I go to sleep. :wink:



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04 Jun 2011, 4:09 pm

I don't know....I'm an Aspie but I find I feel a lot happier knowing that I'm liked by people and that I'm spending more time socialising than being alone in my room all the time. When I was 13, I went through a really depressive stage because there was a point where I didn't have any friends at all.


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OJani
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05 Jun 2011, 5:59 am

Seph wrote:
I just see it as a random emotion I feel on occasion. But then again I'm bipolar which effects my view on it.

TeaEarlGreyHot wrote:
Happiness is a fleeting emotion. It's rather like anger... cannot be maintained indefinitely.

SammichEater wrote:
Happiness, like all things, is relative. I don't think that any one person could ever live a happier life than another. Some people think that others are always happier than them. Well, how does that make sense if they are always happy? You can't just be happy all the time, you need something to be happy about. If you're already happy, how can you be any happier? It just doesn't make any sense.

All of you point out that it can't be a continuous feeling, but I would disagree with it a little. When someone finds just enough occasions in his or her life to be happy about, it gives a feeling of serenity, a tranquility of the soul for a period. So, if somebody speaks about constant happiness, it may be a sequence of positive events in one's life, otherwise it is not true.

Sweetleaf wrote:
I don't know what that is. :?

Perhaps you are just not bothered by pondering about it from time to time. You do what you think you have to, deal with your difficulties according to your best knowledge, enjoy your life in the meantime, and the idea to think about what it means to you just doesn't happen to cross your mind. Quite normal, since happiness is an emotion that we aren't supposed to know much about.

Joe90 wrote:
Happiness depends on the individual, not what neurology they have.

I'm certain that there are significant differences, and the poll suggests it too. Individuals may differ more in this respect, though. I can see how we may differ according to our life period, interests, success in life, introvert/extrovert property.

Joe90 wrote:
I don't know....I'm an Aspie but I find I feel a lot happier knowing that I'm liked by people and that I'm spending more time socialising than being alone in my room all the time. When I was 13, I went through a really depressive stage because there was a point where I didn't have any friends at all.

To belong to somebody is a basic desire of humans, it is something I always appreciated in my life, but to a rather varying degree. Now I'm more concerned about it than I used to be, perhaps because I see my parents aging and my sister becoming more dependent on help. Also, I would like a mate and kids (preferably like the kid I was :) ), I'm admittedly selfish about it, at least I'm telling the truth...