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Pierre_De_Fermat
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19 Aug 2006, 10:09 am

Does anyone here have car/motion sickness? Is it anything to do with AS?



mullion
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19 Aug 2006, 10:53 am

Don't know but it has been linked to dyslexia so I don't see why not with AS/HFA etc etc etc - I have motion sickness (only cars) if hungry, tired (usually overtiredness from stress). It has improved with antidepressants - when I've tried to cut these down, it comes back in full swing as it was when I was a kid. My child has it also often (she has AS/NLD - same as myself). Hubby thinks it's all psychological (he's an NT) & really thinks we exaggerate the problem. Anyway, that's my opinion on the subject. :)



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19 Aug 2006, 11:17 am

I suppose that AS-related sensitivities might make some people more prone to car/motion-sickness, but then again, AS-related under-sensitivities may equally make some people LESS prone to it.
Myself, I've never been car/motion-sick in my life :)


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19 Aug 2006, 11:30 am

It would get car-sick allot when i was a child. Now only if i cannot look out the window as the car is moving or driving. I get worse sea-sick on boats thou.


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19 Aug 2006, 11:51 am

i don't get car sick but if i get on any big rides at the fair i get sick almost immeadiatly especially those tea-cup type of rides, that spin in a fast circle.



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19 Aug 2006, 1:19 pm

Tails wrote:
I suppose that AS-related sensitivities might make some people more prone to car/motion-sickness, but then again, AS-related under-sensitivities may equally make some people LESS prone to it.

Been reading up on Sensory modulation (and integration) disorders, people "over-" or "under-" responding to stimuli of varying sorts. There's the 5 external senses, plus vestibular (balance) & proprioceptive (location of body in space) internal senses, and dyspraxia (motor-planning)-the list goes on.
People w/ASD's can have these patterns of response, but they don't have to co-occur. Those who are "under-responders" may need intense stimuli to be able to notice or feel sensory information-i.e. going on fair rides over & over, without getting the slightest bit nauseated.
I have several areas of oversensitivity incl. tastes, smells, and motion-I can't tolerate being flung around on fair rides. I got carsick as child, and I still feel woozy & unstable when being transported (whether car, boat, train, or plane-therefore, I don't travel much).
I've heard that feeling carsick happens less often to person driving than to passenger-I wouldn't know, can't drive. There's passive and active motion: one's body being moved from outside by someone or something else vs. instinctively self-regulated movement of one's own body. People can be oversensitive to being moved from the outside, yet not upset by moving themselves at their own pace, in their own manner.


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19 Aug 2006, 1:33 pm

I get carsick in SUV almost every time I ride in them, even if I'm the only passenger. Regular sedans are usually fine, unless the weather is hot or there's a lot of people in it. Buses and trains are almost never a problem. It's probably related to how the wheel suspension or the axles of these vehicles is constructed. However, this may have to do with trust issues. I'm more comfortable riding in a vehicle owned by a transit company than in the one owned by an indivudual person.



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19 Aug 2006, 1:39 pm

As a child, I suffered from travel sickness all the time. I couldn't go in a car or bus without being sick.

Doesn't afect me now.



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19 Aug 2006, 1:56 pm

I suffer from travel sickness. Unless I have a travel sickness tablet. I'm only sick if it's a long journey. For example I was in the car for 2 hours when sleeping + staying round someone's last week. I was sick later that night.



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19 Aug 2006, 5:03 pm

I get motion sick in elevators, that's how bad it is! All I know is that it has to do with the inner ear, and I've always gotten a lot of ear infections, up until I was 20. I'm more inclined to relate it to "ear stuff" than to AS...although I'll admit to having no idea what I'm talking about :roll:



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19 Aug 2006, 9:25 pm

Motion sickness has more to do with the way your brain interprets signals from your inner ear.

Whether or not I get car sick usually depends on the driver. Once or twice I've felt sick when I've been driving on a hilly windy road and I've been tired. Time to pull over and have a sleep.

I don't usually get sea sick - though I can get sea sick when out on a small boat in rough seas and we anchor. As long as we keep moving I'm fine but anchoring so you get chucked every which way - not good. I found as long as I kept my eyes fixed on something like the horizon or the bottom of the boat - but didn't swap between, I could control it but otherwise - oh dear.

I know plenty of NT people who get motion sickness so I don't think it is related to aspieness. I do believe you can stop it with will power and concentration - this doesn't work if you are tired or people keep distracting you. I also believe after having it for three weeks solid, your body/brain/ears will adjust - this is what Dame Naomi James described in her book "alone around the world". She was seasick for the first part of her voyage stuck in calm winds and sloppy seas - like being anchored, urk. I think I would have started the engine and quit the adventure first.

As for managing it - if you are going to be distracted - sometimes a placebo like magnetic wrist bands work. Other people swear by electric wrist bands - they've got batteries and run a current - very exciting on a wet boat. And then there are drugs. There pills and patches, and you have to try different things until you find the one that works for you. The pills that work for me - don't work for other people...



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20 Aug 2006, 8:20 am

I get carsick. Which is weird because I never got carsick as a child-- first time it happened I was 21, I think. I've been prone to it ever since, though I've noticed that I don't get it when I'm driving, it's less a problem when I'm in the front passenger seat than if I'm riding in the back of the car, and certain cars are much more likely to make me sick than others-- something to do with the shocks, and the air condidtioning, I think. Almost like the more cut-off I feel from the outside world while in the car, the more likely I am to get sick... so cars that are sealed shut, with a/c I can smell (hard to explain that), and with very smooth shocks so the car almost never goes *bump* are guaranteed to make me sick, while older cars with bone-jarring suspension, driven with the windows open, are no problem.

I suspect some of the a/c "smell" might have to do with minor exhaust leaks. But nobody believes me about this.

Someday, I will have to buy another car, and mystify the salesmen by looking for a car with bad insulation and a bumpy ride...



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20 Aug 2006, 7:55 pm

I don't get car sick at all, but I might feel a little bit nauseous if i'm looking at a map because unlike reading a book, my whole head moves around the map trying to find a place whereas if i'm just reading a book, just my eyes move across the page.


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24 Aug 2006, 12:08 pm

I never get car sick when I drive but if someone else is driving and I'm not looking at the road, I can sometimes easily get car sick.


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24 Aug 2006, 4:04 pm

Yeah I fit into that category where I have to be able to see the road in front of the car (horizon) or I start feeling ill.

It also happens if the car has a strong angle on the windshield like in sports cars where its a bit distorted.. that really makes me woozy.