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JakobVirgil
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23 Jun 2011, 1:04 pm

I was messing about on yourmorals.org and I found this chart.
now they have made some errors in presentation most of the numbers are rounded to .4
but it show that Liberals and Libertarians have similar thinking styles when compared to Conservatives and Moderates.
of course it was a php produced image so I can not show it here
so click <<here>>
do the quiz and see the chart.
Abstract vs. Intuitive Categorization is the name of the quiz.
The researchers are kinda rightish but seem nice.


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Last edited by JakobVirgil on 23 Jun 2011, 1:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

AceOfSpades
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23 Jun 2011, 1:11 pm

I think your link is broken. It's just a bunch of warnings and errors about some syntax or w/e.



JakobVirgil
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23 Jun 2011, 1:18 pm

weird it works for me I will fix it


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AceOfSpades
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23 Jun 2011, 1:20 pm

I'm still getting it dude

Quote:
select userid from triad where userid=
You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near '' at line 1
Warning: mysql_fetch_row(): supplied argument is not a valid MySQL result resource in /home/yourmora/public_html/triad_process.php on line 14
select politics_new from users_new where userid =

I'm using firefox, so maybe that's why? :?



JakobVirgil
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23 Jun 2011, 1:22 pm

Just go to yourmorals.org


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AceOfSpades
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23 Jun 2011, 1:35 pm

Oh ok it's because I have to register. I'll get back to you on that



JakobVirgil
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23 Jun 2011, 2:05 pm

Image
different chart it shows that conservatives are more relativistic that either liberals or libertarians


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Master_Pedant
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23 Jun 2011, 2:44 pm

Most people probably aren't going to go through that process, so better well just post the chart on this forum.

  • Green represents my score
  • Blue represents liberals
  • Purple represents moderates
  • Red represents conservatives
  • Gold represents libertarians
  • Higher scores indicate greater "relational" (intuitive) categorization and less "abstract" categorization


Image


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Master_Pedant
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23 Jun 2011, 2:59 pm

yourmorals wrote:
The scales you completed was a measure of attitudes about whether government should manage its budget based on macroeconomic or microeconomic principles being developed by Ravi Iyer.

The scales is intended to measure four separate constructs. The first scale (microeconomic beliefs) measures how much you think that government monetary policy should resemble household or corporate monetary policy. The second scale measures how much you think government should set policy according to macroeconomic beliefs. The third scale (growth goals) measures how much you think government policy should attempt to promote growth. The fourth scale measures how much you think government policy should attempt to promote individual well-being (well-being goals).

The idea behind the scale is that people have a particular cognitive framework when they think about monetary decisions. If their framework is microeconomic, meaning that the government budget is similar to the budget of households or corporations, then that has an impact on policy positions that is different than if the government budget is seen as governed by more macroeconomic principles. In addition, policy positions on economic policy may also be driven by different goals. Research has shown that well-being goals lead to more equality based conceptions of justice, while growth goals can lead to a proportionality based sense of justice and allocation preferences.


Do you have ideas on improving this study? Or did you encounter any difficulties in answering the questions? Click here to send a message to the creators of this study.



The graph below shows your values on these scales with your score (in green) compared to those of the average Liberal (in blue) , the average Conservative (in red) , and the average Libertarian (in orange) visitor to this website.

Image


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marshall
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24 Jun 2011, 12:19 am

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marshall
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24 Jun 2011, 1:13 am

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dionysian
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24 Jun 2011, 1:27 am

Master_Pedant wrote:
  • Green represents my score
  • Blue represents liberals
  • Purple represents moderates
  • Red represents conservatives
  • Gold represents libertarians
  • Higher scores indicate greater "relational" (intuitive) categorization and less "abstract" categorization

Image


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Master_Pedant
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24 Jun 2011, 1:35 am

yourmorals wrote:
The scale you completed was the "Moral Foundations Questionnaire," developed by Jesse Graham and Jonathan Haidt at the University of Virginia.

The scale is a measure of your reliance on and endorsement of five psychological foundations of morality that seem to be found across cultures. Each of the two parts of the scale contained four questions related to each foundation: 1) harm/care, 2) fairness/reciprocity (including issues of rights), 3) ingroup/loyalty, 4) authority/respect, and 5) purity/sanctity.

The idea behind the scale is that human morality is the result of biological and cultural evolutionary processes that made human beings very sensitive to many different (and often competing) issues. Some of these issues are about treating other individuals well (the first two foundations - harm and fairness). Other issues are about how to be a good member of a group or supporter of social order and tradition (the last three foundations). Haidt and Graham have found that political liberals generally place a higher value on the first two foundations; they are very concerned about issues of harm and fairness (including issues of inequality and exploitation). Political conservatives care about harm and fairness too, but they generally score slightly lower on those scale items. The big difference between liberals and conservatives seems to be that conservatives score slightly higher on the ingroup/loyalty foundation, and much higher on the authority/respect and purity/sanctity foundations.

This difference seems to explain many of the most contentious issues in the culture war. For example, liberals support legalizing gay marriage (to be fair and compassionate), whereas many conservatives are reluctant to change the nature of marriage and the family, basic building blocks of society. Conservatives are more likely to favor practices that increase order and respect (e.g., spanking, mandatory pledge of allegiance), whereas liberals often oppose these practices as being violent or coercive.

In the graph below, your scores on each foundation are shown in green (the 1st bar in each set of 3 bars). The scores of all liberals who have taken it on our site are shown in blue (the 2nd bar), and the scores of all conservatives are shown in red (3rd bar). Scores run from 0 (the lowest possible score, you completely reject that foundation) to 5 (the highest possible score, you very strongly endorse that foundation and build much of your morality on top of it).

Image


yourmorals wrote:
The scale you completed was the "Schwartz Value Survey," created by Shalom Schwartz at Hebrew University, Israel.

The scale measures the degree to which you value each of ten domains that Schwartz has found across many cultures. Values are defined as "desirable, trans-situational goals, varying in importance, that serve as guiding principles in people's lives."

The idea behind the scale is that there is an internal order and structure to values. Using various statistical techniques, Schwartz has found that the ten basic human values show a pattern of relationships that can be graphed as a circle (see below). Values that are next to each other are closely related; values that are across from each other tend to be opposed, or tend not to be strongly endorsed by the same person. Political liberals have been found to endorse the "openness to change" values, while conservatives are more likely to endorse the "conservation" values. We have put this scale up on Yourmorals.org because we are interested in learning how Schwartz's ten values (which include moral and non-moral values) relate to the "five foundations of morality" theory from Haidt and Graham, as measured by the "Moral Foundations Questionnaire."



The values are described by Schwartz as follows:

POWER: Social status and prestige, control or dominance over people and resources
ACHIEVEMENT: Personal success through demonstrating competence according to social standards
HEDONISM: Pleasure or sensuous gratification for oneself
STIMULATION: Excitement, novelty, and challenge in life
SELF-DIRECTION: Independent thought and action - choosing, creating, exploring
UNIVERSALISM: Understanding, appreciation, tolerance, and protection for the welfare of all people and for nature
BENEVOLENCE: Preservation and enhancement of the welfare of people with whom one is in frequent personal contact
TRADITION: Respect, commitment, and acceptance of the customs and ideas that traditional culture or religion provide
CONFORMITY: Restraint of actions, inclinations, and impulses likely to upset or harm others and violate social expectations or norms
SECURITY: Safety, harmony, and stability of society, of relationships, and of self


The figure below shows your averages (in green) compared to the average scores of liberals (in blue) and the average scores of conservatives (in red).

Image


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Master_Pedant
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24 Jun 2011, 1:46 am

yourmorals wrote:
The scale you completed was Part 2 of the "Moral Foundations Questionnaire" (MFQ) developed by Jesse Graham and Jonathan Haidt at the University of Virginia.

The scale is a measure of your endorsement of several different kinds of fairness and liberty.

The idea behind the scale is that there are at least 5 psychological "foundations" of morality, which are measured in the original Moral Foundations Questionnaire. We have long found that political liberals and conservatives score differently on those foundations. But some critics (other psychologists, and some visitors to our site) have told us that there are some moral issues that were not measured in the original MFQ. In particular, we had no foundation related to liberty/autonomy. And we measured Fairness mostly as concerns about equality (on which liberals score higher), whereas there are several other kinds of fairness, some of which might be higher among conservatives. In this version of the MFQ, we are hoping to correct those defects. We are collecting data from a few thousand people on these potentially "missing" foundations. We'll look particularly closely at people who completed two or all three parts of the MFQ and see which questions correlate with which other questions, for which kinds of people. If the data show that there are more than 5 major clusters of moral issues, we will revise our theory. Thank you for helping us to improve!

In the graphs below, your scores on each of the potentially new foundations is shown in green (the 1st bar in each set of 3 bars). The scores of all liberals who have taken this survey are shown in blue (the 2nd bar), and the scores of all conservatives are shown in red (3rd bar). Scores run from 0 (the lowest possible score, you completely reject that foundation) to 5 (the highest possible score, you very strongly endorse that foundation and build much of your morality on top of it).

Image

The graph above shows your scores on four different kinds of fairness:
  • Fairness as egalitarianism (e.g., "ideally, everyone would end up with the same amount of money)
  • Fairness as equity or proportionality (e.g., "people who work the hardest should be paid the most")
  • Fairness as retribution (e.g., "an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth")
  • Fairness as personal responsibility vs. freeloading (e.g., "whether or not everyone is pulling their own weight")


Image

The graph above shows your scores on three different kinds of liberty/autonomy:

  • Personal liberty (e.g., "everyone should be free to do as they choose...");
  • Freedom from government (e.g., "the government interferes too much in our everyday lives");
  • National autonomy (e.g., "I want my nation to stay clear of treaties that will limit...")


yourmorals wrote:
The scale you completed was Part C of the "Moral Foundations Questionnaire" (MFQ) developed by Jesse Graham and Jonathan Haidt at the University of Virginia.

The scale is a measure of the degree to which you care about several potentially moral issues that are not yet measured by our main scale, the MFQ. The five issues measured here are: Universalism, Liberal-Purity, Authenticity, Waste, and Self-control.

The idea behind the scale is that there are at least 5 psychological "foundations" of morality, which are measured in the original Moral Foundations Questionnaire. We have long found that political liberals and conservatives score differently on those foundations. But some critics (other psychologists, and some visitors to our site) have told us that there are some moral issues that were not measured in the original MFQ. In particular, some have said that we missed some "liberal" virtues, such as universalism (i.e., having a large moral circle that includes all human beings and does not favor one's local group or nation), and some forms of liberal purity concerns, such as concerns about artificial foods. (Conservatives seem to heavily moralize sexuality, but liberals may be using some of the same psychological systems to moralize food, natural foods, and the "purity" of nature in general). In this version of the MFQ, we are hoping to test these criticisms of our theory. We are collecting data from a few thousand people on these potentially "missing" foundations. We'll look particularly closely at people who took two or all three parts of the MFQ and see which questions correlate with which other questions, for which kinds of people. If the data show that there are more than 5 major clusters of moral issues, we will revise our theory. Thank you for helping us to improve!

In the graphs below, your scores on each of the potentially new foundations is shown in green (the 1st bar in each set of 3 bars). The scores of all liberals who have taken this survey are shown in blue (the 2nd bar), and the scores of all conservatives are shown in red (3rd bar). Scores run from 0 (the lowest possible score, you completely reject that foundation) to 5 (the highest possible score, you very strongly endorse that foundation and build much of your morality on top of it).

Image

The graph above shows your scores on five candidate moral "foundations":

  • Universalism (e.g., "I wish the world did not have nations or borders and we were all part of one big group.");
  • Liberal purity (e.g., "Eating genetically modified foods pollutes the body");
  • Authenticity (e.g., "It is better to stay true to yourself than to follow the dictates of society");
  • Waste (e.g., "It is morally wrong to let food go to waste unnecessarily");
  • Self-control (e.g., "Self-control is more important than self-expression")


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dionysian
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24 Jun 2011, 2:02 am

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"All valuation rests on an irrational bias."
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ALL ANIMALS ARE EQUAL
BUT SOME ANIMALS ARE MORE EQUAL THAN OTHERS