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4thdoctor
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03 Jul 2011, 3:47 pm

think it's about time we has a thread to the one person who defines who people with asperger's is more than any other Hans Asperger he one of the most underrated people of the last 100 years with out this man we'd not be in the place we are today :)



wavefreak58
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03 Jul 2011, 4:50 pm

Good point.

Hans did good.


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03 Jul 2011, 4:54 pm

Hans Asperger
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A white-coated man in his thirties sits at a table across from a boy. He looks intently at the boy through his rimless glasses. His hair is cropped fairly short on the sides and is wavy on top. The boy, seated in the foreground with his back toward the viewer, sits straight up, with one arm resting on the arm of a wooden chair.

Hans Asperger (February 18, 1906 – October 21, 1980) was an Austrian pediatrician, after whom Asperger syndrome (AS) was named. He wrote over 300 publications, mostly concerning autism in children.


Hans Asperger was born on a farm in Hausbrunn,[2] just outside of Vienna.[3] He was the elder of two sons. In his youth he showed particular talents for language, frequently quoting Franz Grillparzer[4] He had difficulty finding friends and was considered a lonely, remote child. Asperger studied medicine in Vienna and practised at the University Children's Hospital in Vienna. He was conferred doctor of medicine in 1931 and assumed directorship of the play-pedagogic station at the university children's clinic in Vienna in 1932.[3] He married in 1935 and had five children.[5]

In the later years of World War II he was a medical officer in Croatia; his younger brother died in Stalingrad.[5] In 1944, after the publication of his landmark paper describing autistic symptoms, he found a permanent tenured post at the University of Vienna. Shortly after the war ended, he became director of a children's clinic in the city. He was appointed chair of pediatrics at the University of Vienna, a post he held for twenty years. He later held a post at Innsbruck. Beginning in 1964, he headed the SOS-Kinderdorf in Hinterbrühl.[3] He became professor emeritus in 1977.

Asperger died before his identification of this pattern of behaviour became widely recognized because his work was mostly in German and little-translated. The first person to use the term "Asperger's Syndrome" in a paper was British researcher Lorna Wing. Her paper, Asperger's syndrome: a clinical account, was published in 1981 and challenged the previously accepted model of autism presented by Leo Kanner in 1943.[6] His reports were only translated into English in 1989.[7] Unlike Kanner, Hans Asperger's findings were ignored and disregarded in the English-speaking world in his lifetime. Finally, from the early 1990s, his findings began to gain notice, and nowadays Asperger syndrome is recognized as a diagnosis in many countries of the world.


Hans Asperger published a definition of Asperger syndrome in 1944 that was nearly identical with the definition that a russian neurologist Ssucharewa (Груня Ефимовна Сухарева, born 1891) had published already in 1926[8][9]. Hans Asperger identified in four boys a pattern of behavior and abilities that he called "autistic psychopathy,[10]" ( Die "Autistischen Psychopathen" im Kindesalter[11]). The pattern included "a lack of empathy, little ability to form friendships, one-sided conversations, intense absorption in a special interest, and clumsy movements." Asperger called children with AS "little professors" because of their ability to talk about their favorite subject in great detail. It is commonly said[by whom?] that the paper was based on only four boys. However, Dr. Günter Krämer, of Zürich, who knew Asperger, states that it "was based on investigations of more than 400 children."[citation needed]

Asperger was convinced that many of the children he identified as having autistic symptoms would use their special talents in adulthood. He followed one, Fritz V., into adulthood. Fritz V. became a professor of astronomy and solved an error in Newton’s work he originally noticed as a child. Asperger’s positive outlook contrasts strikingly with Leo Kanner's description of autism, of which Asperger's syndrome is often considered to be a high-functioning form. In his 1944 paper, as Dr. Uta Frith translated it from the German in 1991, Asperger wrote:


We are convinced, then, that autistic people have their place in the organism of the social community. They fulfil their role well, perhaps better than anyone else could, and we are talking of people who as children had the greatest difficulties and caused untold worries to their care-givers.[12]


Near the end of World War II, Asperger opened a school for children with autistic psychopathy, with Sister Victorine Zak. The school was bombed towards the end of the war, Sister Victorine was killed, the school was destroyed and much of Asperger's early work was lost.[13]

As a child, Asperger himself appeared to have exhibited features of the condition subsequently named after him. He was described as a lonely and remote child, who had difficulty making friends. He was talented in language; in particular he was interested in the Austrian poet Franz Grillparzer, whose poetry he would frequently quote to his uninterested classmates. He also liked to quote himself and often referred to himself from a third-person perspective.[5]



Last edited by Surfman on 03 Jul 2011, 5:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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03 Jul 2011, 6:20 pm

" ... If we could eliminate the genes for things like autism, I think it would be disastrous," says Wilhelmsen. "The healthiest state for a gene pool is maximum diversity of things that might be good."

One of the first people to intuit the significance of this was Asperger himself - weaving his continuum like a protective blanket over the young patients in his clinic as the Nazis shipped so-called mental defectives to the camps.

"It seems that for success in science and art," he wrote, "a dash of autism is essential."

Hans's 1944 original paper here: http://www.paulcooijmans.com/asperger/a ... rized.html
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