I've been unemployed for 3 years. Anyone beat that?

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DinoMongoosePenguin
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29 Dec 2016, 11:23 am

Joe90 wrote:
Because of my disability, (and my state of mind), it's been major difficult for me to find the right employment for me, especially with all these stupid cut-backs. I've done college coursework, volluntary work, work experiences, interview practices, courses, and even employment counselling, and I've still am nowhere forward than what I was 3 years ago. I am too useless and the economy is too terrible.

Right now I'm doing some computer courses, because I want to have proffessional computer skills, because I want to try and get into work where I'm using the computer, because I feel that the computer is the only thing I'm most confident at, and I think I will be most happy with this. The more complicated, the better, because I do like a challenge, and I am very good at problem-solving on computers when it comes to projects and assignments on the computer. I feel I'm less good when rushing around doing things, because I feel I get in the way, put something somewhere I shouldn't, and I feel embarrassed with my object-blindness issues. So I know that being at a computer will be more beneficial for me.

But anyway, the question is - anyone else been unemployed for over 3 years solid? If so, then I will feel much better, because at the moment I shamefully feel I'm reaching a record here, especially knowing that I've gotten nowhere even after occupying myself with achieving skills.


Yes. I graduated in May of 2013. Had one time of getting close to a job (which may still work out) but that's it. (The other interviews didn't go nearly as far.) I've tried applying in my field (Computer Science), jobs below my field (things I could have gotten just with an Associates degree or even a high school diploma), have tried Indeed.com, the sites of companies themselves, staffing companies, cold emailing resumes, etc, even help from Department of Rehabilitation Services. Still nothing is working.



DinoMongoosePenguin
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29 Dec 2016, 12:03 pm

AngelRho wrote:
WantToHaveALife wrote:
ColdEyesWarmHeart wrote:
I haven't had a permanent job since early 2008. I've been an agency temp since then. I manage to get work on average about 3 days a week, which isn't great to live on but a heck of a lot better than being on benefits. (And the whole procedure of going and signing-on (that's the process of going to the Jobcentre once a fortnight to sign for your benefit money) is hellish in itself.) Or it was, the temp wages were pretty good when I first started doing it but now it isn't much above minimum wage.

A few times I've had temp-to-perm roles but never been kept on permanently, I've never fitted in and often get bullied out of jobs (one memorable example, the clique I worked with were sabotaging my work) even though the bosses are happy with my work, my face doesn't fit there.

On the other hand, I always get asked back by every company I've temped for and my temp agency staff know they can call me last-minute to work that day, and I'll show up on time and ready to do a day's work. It's a shame this can't translate into success in a permanent job.

Another problem is that I have a great reputation for being able to work alone on boring stuff with no supervision, so I always get sent for those kind of jobs and I like them, but it means I don't have the team-player experience on my CV that every company seems to be looking for now.


seriously, what caused this recession to happen? could it have been prevented?

Banks were handing out mortgages without actually checking to make sure borrowers could actually make their payments. To bring in extra money, they were selling securities on those mortgages. That created a glut of MBA's fresh out of college who were trained to think they'd be millionaires by the time they were 30, and their egos didn't allow them to understand they were just living in Idiotville. So along with their $200,000 McMansions, $50,000 student loans, their $30,000 car notes, and over $10,000 on credit cards, they found that their $30,000/yr jobs didn't even pay 1/4 of a month's bills.

The first thing that happens is the credit card companies turn the accounts over to collections. What they don't realize is credit cards are unsecured, so collectors can't do a damned thing about the debts. So they try to fudge on house payments or student loans because they let themselves be intimidated by collections. They can't give up the car because that's how they get to their jobs. They HAVE to have that shiny brand-new car when the sensible thing to do is just get a $3000 beater they can pay cash for. Different things can happen, but they all follow the same pattern.

The next thing that happens is the car gets repo'd, which means Mr. Green MBA can't get to work, which means he gets fired. No job=no house payment, which in turn = mortgage default, followed by foreclosure.

And that's where the trouble begins for EVERYONE. When a bank forecloses, they sell the house at auction. There's no way in hell that they'll get what's owed. So what do they do? They sue the former homeowner for the difference. Well, you can't squeeze blood from a turnip. So how do banks recoup on their losses? They DON'T.

So what happens next? Interest rates for new loans go up, interest rates on long-term investments go down. AND there's a glut of homes on the market. No demand + high supply = devalued homes. So the people who realize they're upside down on house and car notes before it's too late can't even GIVE their homes and cars away to get out from under their debts. The bubble has burst. Banks can't get their money, so the money just bleeds out. Businesses hedging themselves through bank stocks lose their investment income. All those investors who were depending on mortgage securities for income find themselves going bankrupt. Which means businesses either close or lay off employees just to stay afloat.

So you have HUGE banks in control with most everyone's debts going nearly bankrupt and pulling all their investors down with them. They are "too big to fail," so you have government bailouts. People can't afford to borrow money with interest rate hikes, so they stop buying cars. Which means the Big 3 auto companies aren't selling cars. Which means they have to lay off employees. And there are a LOT of employees, and the unions aren't having that. So the government has to bail them out, too. The Fed increases how much deposit insurance banks can claim, and they start printing more money, which decreases the value of the US dollar. Prices of groceries and gasoline skyrocket. Which threatens the profitability of farmers. And more people apply for food stamps. And with increased unemployment, more people are filing unemployment insurance claims, which eventually means selling more bonds to China or raising taxes, most likely on the middle class. Either way, there are MASSIVE national debt increases that someone is ultimately going to have to pay for.

Technically, that's how we got here with banks having absolutely no accountability for the money they loaned people.

The real problem is overall people not knowing how handle their money.

First of all, "follow your dreams" is just bad advice for parents to give their kids and for teachers to give their students. Developing a strong work ethic is the first step in training kids for "real life." And it helps to lead by example in showing young people what being a good money manager looks like. Before you follow your dreams, first get yourself on solid financial footing with a "real job" before trying to do something big. My dream? I write music. Is that something that brings in a lot of money? Only for certain people, of which I am not. So what do I do? I have a church gig that pays competitively, teach piano lessons at a college extension, play in a band, and I take every gig I get offered. Sure, I'm still under the poverty line, but my income alone pays almost all of our household bills. Meanwhile I write and perform my own music, get some of my work on Youtube and Soundcloud occasionally, and network every chance I get. I don't how long it's going to take to get some kind of payoff, though I did make a little money on a work-for-hire project for a non-profit I've been courting for the last few years. I'm also saving every penny I can for some equipment purchases for something that could potentially be a huge money-maker that I could also use to promote my own music. It's a dream worth working for, but the point is you can't follow your dreams if you don't have a plan.

Second, it is generally a bad idea to incur massive student loans for a college education. Something is terribly wrong when someone can have $140,000 student loans for a degree in journalism and end up being a hair stylist. There's nothing wrong with being a hair stylist, but it's not something you need a $140,000 degree for in an unrelated field!

Third, unsecured debts are just a bad idea. If you want something, earn the money and save up for what you want. Don't use credit cards. EVER. FOR ANYTHING.

Fourth, as I've already said, you don't need to pay $20,000+ for a new car. $3,000 is plenty enough for something that will get you to and from your job. If you do really well in your career and you have profits pouring in, sure, go for it. But you don't need anything you can't pay cash for.

Fifth, don't try to buy the nice 5-bedroom McMansion in your first 5 years on the job. Just rent. When things start working out for you, buy a 3-bedroom trailer on the edge of town for between $35,000 and $50,000 (to include the lot). And make sure you get a 15 year, fixed rate on it AND you can afford those payments. If you can't afford it, DON'T sign the mortgage!

More than anything, always pay IN CASH. Sure, that means you'll have zero credit--but if you're paying in cash for everything what do you need credit for? House mortgage? All you need is a manual underwriter and the bank will hand you all the money you need on zero credit. All you have to do is show that you have good income and no bad debt--and I mean not so much as an unpaid library fine. Just don't do anything stupid and you'll save yourself the pain that a lot of poor MBA graduates are suffering through while they live in their parents' basements. If you want to be rich, do what rich people do. If you want to be poor, do what poor people do. It's that simple. And if more people understood that, we wouldn't have idiotic situations like housing market bubbles that end up screwing over the vast majority of us.


The truth is that the government was often MAKING them give out loans that the banks feared might not be paid back. Then this mess happened and so the government bailed them out. The Feds were able to keep the recession from being WORSE than it was by printing all that money, but they also screwed up the recovery at the same time, as their printing money caused wages to stagnate while cost of living went up. Also, most of the jobs created during this "recovery" were the type that are NOT the most Aspie friendly and/or don't pay the best. Meanwhile, loads of students were in college, taking out considerable loans to get the jobs that USED to be there, but then those jobs lessened, leading to people with big college loans either unemployed or underemployed, unable to pay off their loans. Indeed, the student loan debt is now about TWICE the amount of the bailout of the TARP thing for the banks. Meanwhile, with so many unemployed, employers were able to get more for less, thus having enough people out there with experience that they were able to set "entry level" as requiring two years of experience, thus keeping MORE younger people out. Added to that, the companies were able to claim fake "shortages" of talent so that they could bring in H1Bs to further grow the labor supply, thus stagnating wages and they kept pushing for Amnesty (but luckily didn't get it) so that they could further grow the labor supply and depress wages.



Last edited by DinoMongoosePenguin on 29 Dec 2016, 12:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Tim_Tex
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29 Dec 2016, 12:14 pm

It's been about 3 years here. Any college degree outside of the STEM fields is useless.


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Scorpius14
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29 Dec 2016, 6:52 pm

I don't really have a disability, technically been unemployed for 4.5 years if u discount the time spent at university, fell in the cracks of a failed government scheme, not suitable for their advice/courses/placements but at same time not eligible for disability welfare support with my social anxiety and expired autism diagnosis.

Hate that I am called an aspie because the family's only experience of autism is aspergers syndrome. And do not support me whatsoever in pursuing work, after countless times asking if they have anything in their line of work.

As i'm forced to attend a programme (similar to voc rehab) that is instructed by the government welfare office, they sanction (stop money) anyone who does not comply with their demands. Non-compliance would include many things such as not interacting with others enough, not attending group sessions. As i have regrettably not atttended these sessions, i have paid (and still paying) the price of non-compliance. My family member that is supporting me is under the guise that I am still getting money in, when in reality i am not and they will not understand the predicament regarding my mental state and my situation with the staff at the programme. They are not accommodating to my needs, they throw everyone into the deep end, they are demoralising and discriminative, and you're proof is only your word against theirs.

Always on a spiral of depression after this realisation.



Belushi87
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15 Jan 2017, 6:00 am

I haven't worked since 2011. I've have gotten jobs that only last a couple days because it just didn't work out.



Lucywlf
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15 Jan 2017, 11:58 pm

Unemployed 17 years. I've had to raise my severely autistic twins with only my husband for help. There was nobody else who could take care of them. I'd love to have another job but I don't see that happening now.



cathylynn
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16 Jan 2017, 12:17 am

was unemployed for 12 years (in spite of a graduate degree) from 1996 to 2008. did lots of volunteer work and some school in that time. lots of applications. a few interviews, mostly for civil service positions. the volunteer work eventually put me in good stead for a job.



JakeASD
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23 Jan 2017, 4:10 pm

Prior to being hired by the NHS, I was unemployed for six years. I was quite content living in a fantasy world as a trigolyte during the majority of this period. But alas, I finally had to accept the reality of my pitiful situation, and now I work as an admin apprentice in an environment which is extremely overstimulating.


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Belushi87
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23 Jan 2017, 10:46 pm

if you have a hard time looking for work because of the time between your last job and now, you could always focus on your interests. if there is something you want to do, do it. you have the time and you could get better at what you love to do.



HouseOfMadpeak
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09 Feb 2017, 6:54 pm

The job market (in Canada at least) has been bad since 2008. And especially difficult for people social problems and disabilities. Any decent jobs are very competitive. Especially in cities with a lot of students. They typically want people who recently graduated, but also have experience (usually co-op). The jobs in my field (chemistry) have 500 to over 1000 views for one job posting. And they also require social skills.

There are a lot of temporary, part-time, service industry jobs that pay minimum wage. But it is competitive even for those jobs. If you have too much education and are applying for a job that doesn't require it, remove it from your resume.

If you have gaps in your resume, it will work against you. If you are older and your work experience/education indicates your age, it will also work against you.

I would suggest just making stuff up. Something realistic, with skills you have acquired at previous jobs, or use old jobs but just flex the dates. Or add some educational fluff so it doesn't just look like you were unemployed. Like self-employment. Being realistic. I can't lie so I have a hard time making stuff up. I have been unemployed since 2012, but I went to school again in 2014.

Employers should be more realistic about gaps since there are a lot of unemployed people who can't find employment. But they are not. And the job market is in favour of employers right now.

In Canada they have programs that help people with disabilities find a job (a subsidy for employers who hire those with disabilities, also training programs), but the findings have been that the employers keep the employees only as long as they receive the subsidy, then let them go.



dtoxic2
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10 Feb 2017, 5:10 pm

I last worked a job-type-job in 2004, so that's 13 years.
Been homeless since 2010, living half out of my van and half a sort of squatting situation involving a commercial building.
I do make and occasionally sell some art.



flownawy
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17 Feb 2017, 10:11 am

sucessful unemployed since 10 years



aeonon
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17 Feb 2017, 2:42 pm

I've been unemployed for 10 years with the exception of a brief temporary job for about 3 weeks 7 years ago, and a job for 3 days 6 years ago. I have been sent out on some jobcenter internships recently, though the first one ended in severe meltdowns. The current one is less intensive and is going better.



JakeASD
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17 Feb 2017, 3:32 pm

After handing in my resignation letter earlier today, I will be leaving my current role with the NHS in four weeks' time. Incidentally, it was my first paid job for over six years, so my future looks somewhat bleak right now. I just cannot seem to cope in the workplace at all. My mind is either blank or extremely foggy, my working memory is non-existent and the dreadfully slow speed at which I learn is pitiful. I highly doubt I will find work again.

What is one to do when one's intellectual IQ is so low? I think I am completely screwed.


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Scorpius14
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17 Feb 2017, 10:56 pm

i've only recently got a zero hour contract job, which they implied was a self-employment sort of thing whatever that means, which is the first paid job i've had since the warehouse job i had 3 years ago, with filling the gap with work experience moderately spaced out. so due to start this job which involves cleaning private homes which basically means homes like the one i'm living in right now, and they assure me they will be vulnerable people i'll be helping out so maybe not so hard for me to deal with - as I consider myself a vulnerable person. As i have a certain ocd with cleaning it might be a tad challenging but i have a good eye for detail which is what they look for in a cleaner i should be alright. so anxiously waiting (good anxious or impatient as it were), for when they ask me to come and ask me to work, as it's been a long time since earning money.