Can someone have more than 1 autistic spectrum disorder?

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littlelily613
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31 Jul 2011, 3:49 pm

Lucywlf wrote:
I apologize about the "jumping down my throat" comment.


Oh okay. Still, I won't retract my comment questioning what that actually means. :? I think I get your implication, but I am at a loss to where all these metaphors that people use come from and how jumping down a person's threat implies a verbal attack. Not picking...and it is rhetorical curiousity....

Lucywlf wrote:
Oh, btw, I don't think PDD is the equivalent of alleycats or "mixed breeds". It goes against what all of you have been saying about the autism spectrum: that you can't have two diagnoses at once, therefore your autism "breed", by definition, cannot be mixed.

Maybe PDDs are the new species that have not yet been named.


I am not sure I get this....but all ASDs are PDDs. Everyone who is autistic or has aspergers or pddnos all have a PDD.

But like I said, I am not sure if I understood what you are saying.


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AlexWelshman
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31 Jul 2011, 3:56 pm

littlelily613 wrote:
[quote="
A lot of AS people have ADHD as a comorbid. That does not make ADHD part of AS. A lot of people with ASDs also have anxiety. That does not mean anxiety overlaps with ASDs. It just means people can have both conditions simultaneously, same as with ADHD. I would say that most of those that are "misdiagnosed" with ADHD are not really misdiagnosed at all (though for some that might be the case). Many of them likely have both conditions, and the AS was just missed.

Just like a lot of people with autism (usually not aspergers) also have Learning Disabilities, but that doesn't mean LD's are a part of ASD does it? I agree.



League_Girl
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31 Jul 2011, 4:02 pm

At my doctor's office they have list of conditions written down that I have. They have Asperger's and infantile autism. I don't know why they have both down. I never asked. I did ask about infantile autism and they said it's what they have down for my Asperger's but I didn't even think to ask why both labels. Now I wish I did ask but didn't think of it then. But it would have been awkward to ask it out of the blue so I never asked the next time I was there.


Oh and "Jumping down your throat" means getting on someone's case as in yelling at them.



AlexWelshman
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31 Jul 2011, 4:04 pm

League_Girl wrote:
At my doctor's office they have list of conditions written down that I have. They have Asperger's and infantile autism. I don't know why they have both down. I never asked. I did ask about infantile autism and they said it's what they have down for my Asperger's but I didn't even think to ask why both labels. Now I wish I did ask but didn't think of it then. But it would have been awkward to ask it out of the blue so I never asked the next time I was there.


Oh and "Jumping down your throat" means getting on someone's case as in yelling at them.
What is 'infantile autism'?



Callista
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31 Jul 2011, 4:17 pm

It's like this:
Image
Each circle represents a group of traits. Where they overlap, that means two diagnoses share those traits. For example, Asperger's shares almost all of its traits with Autistic Disorder, except for the "normal curiosity about the environment" trait, which is represented by the small pink section.

The whole diagram could be labeled "Autism" or "Pervasive Developmental Disorders", depending on how technical you wanted to get.

The diagnoses take precedence like this (you get diagnosed with the first one on the list that you qualify for):
Rett's
CDD
Autistic disorder
Asperger's
PDD-NOS

Most cases, as I've said, filter through the list and stop all the way at the bottom, at PDD-NOS.

Hmm, come to think of it, that diagram should be slightly different--Rett's should overlap with CDD and classic autism a little, because it shares speech loss with CDD and repetitive motion with classic autism. Oops. Pretend it does.


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cw10
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31 Jul 2011, 4:23 pm

I might be a bit of an Aspie, but I also have a mild case of dyslexia, so yeah I think so.



AlexWelshman
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31 Jul 2011, 4:32 pm

cw10 wrote:
I might be a bit of an Aspie, but I also have a mild case of dyslexia, so yeah I think so.
But dyslexia's a seperate condition altogether! I was talking about more than 1 autistic disorder; not just more than one condition as well as autism.



Callista
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31 Jul 2011, 7:08 pm

Maybe the confusion comes from the terminology.

"Autism" is a synonym for "Pervasive Developmental Disorder". Both are names for the category of PDDs that includes Asperger's, classic autism, Rett's, CDD, and PDD-NOS.

"Autism" is also a synonym for "Classic Autism" or "Kanner Syndrome", which is a specific disorder within the category of pervasive developmental disorders.

"Pervasive Developmental Disorder" is a name for autism in general. But "PDD-NOS", or "Pervasive Developmental Disorder, Not Otherwise Specified," is a specific autism spectrum disorder. PDD-NOS is also known as "atypical autism".

So, if your diagnosis is PDD-NOS, you could correctly say:
"I have PDD-NOS."
"I have atypical autism."
"I have a PDD."
"I'm autistic."

The first two refer to the specific diagnosis; the second two refer to the general category. It is like saying, "I have a simple fracture of the right radius," versus, "I have a broken bone."

To add even more confusion, "Autism" can refer to both classic autism and autism in general. So, someone diagnosed with classic autism could say:
"I have Kanner's syndrome."
"I have classic autism."
"I have autistic disorder."
"I have a PDD."
"I'm autistic."

The first three in that case are the specific diagnosis; the last two are the general category.

The range of statements for Asperger's, in case you were wondering:
"I have Asperger Syndrome/Asperger Disorder."
"I have a PDD."
"I'm autistic."


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Lucywlf
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01 Aug 2011, 9:17 am

I meant PDDNOS, not PDD

I'm so used to talking to neurotypicals I've picked up a lot of mannerisms. Only recently have I discovered that I'm not like them and that's why they think I'm so weird. :)

Sometimes I think I'm just an NT who was raised in an Aspie family.



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01 Aug 2011, 9:51 am

I know somebody who is quite non-verbal, but is high-functioning. She doesn't stim or have any sensory issues or anything like that. She does a job where she stacks boxes in a warehouse. She is just like an NT but without the verbal part. When she does talk, it comes out as a tiny squeak that seems to get lost in her throat, and some words she doesn't finish off. She is very, very non-verbal at social situations. She sits very still and doesn't even laugh - just smiles a tiny bit. But otherwise, she does laugh and smile all the time, in fact, laughing and smiling is her main way of communicating in general. Maybe she's more verbal at home, I don't know.

I don't quite know what this disorder is.


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Last edited by Joe90 on 01 Aug 2011, 10:58 am, edited 1 time in total.

Poke
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01 Aug 2011, 10:25 am

A proper understanding of what autism in general actually is would render this entire thread superfluous.



Callista
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01 Aug 2011, 1:38 pm

Joe90 wrote:
I know somebody who is quite non-verbal, but is high-functioning. She doesn't stim or have any sensory issues or anything like that. She does a job where she stacks boxes in a warehouse. She is just like an NT but without the verbal part. When she does talk, it comes out as a tiny squeak that seems to get lost in her throat, and some words she doesn't finish off. She is very, very non-verbal at social situations. She sits very still and doesn't even laugh - just smiles a tiny bit. But otherwise, she does laugh and smile all the time, in fact, laughing and smiling is her main way of communicating in general. Maybe she's more verbal at home, I don't know.

I don't quite know what this disorder is.
I'd call it "aphasia", but that's just the technical term for not being able to speak :)


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AlexWelshman
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01 Aug 2011, 3:00 pm

Callista wrote:
Joe90 wrote:
I know somebody who is quite non-verbal, but is high-functioning. She doesn't stim or have any sensory issues or anything like that. She does a job where she stacks boxes in a warehouse. She is just like an NT but without the verbal part. When she does talk, it comes out as a tiny squeak that seems to get lost in her throat, and some words she doesn't finish off. She is very, very non-verbal at social situations. She sits very still and doesn't even laugh - just smiles a tiny bit. But otherwise, she does laugh and smile all the time, in fact, laughing and smiling is her main way of communicating in general. Maybe she's more verbal at home, I don't know.

I don't quite know what this disorder is.
I'd call it "aphasia", but that's just the technical term for not being able to speak :)
So would you say she isn't autistic at all? Just "aphasia"?



Callista
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01 Aug 2011, 4:56 pm

How am I supposed to know? I'm not a doctor and I haven't met the girl! It's possible to have extreme speech issues and minor traits in every other area and be diagnosed autistic, though. Or you could have just the lack of speech and they'd just say "aphasia"...


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