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Callista
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01 Aug 2011, 1:55 am

It's difficult living with an invisible disability. People don't give you the slack they give people with visible disabilities; so they overestimate your abilities and judge you by NT standards.

But having a visible disability is no easier. When people know you are disabled because it's obvious, they underestimate you, assuming that you are basically incapable.

Either assumption is frustrating and annoying, and it's pretty pointless to argue over which one is worse. I'd rather try to debunk both assumptions in the mind of the general public and popularize a more realistic picture of disability in general and autism in particular.


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Surfman
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01 Aug 2011, 2:15 am

My view is to dress like an eccentric. It gives NT's a signal and they could act differently

Hair and mannerisms would need to fit, I guess you would need to change internally

NT's can suck anyways



Callista
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01 Aug 2011, 2:19 am

Ah, but many of them don't suck. So it's ridiculous to avoid them altogether.

It's like eating delicious strawberry ice cream, only you know there's a brussels sprout in it somewhere, and you don't know where!


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cyberdad
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01 Aug 2011, 2:19 am

Callista wrote:
It's difficult living with an invisible disability. People don't give you the slack they give people with visible disabilities; so they overestimate your abilities and judge you by NT standards.
.


I think if you asked somebody would they rather have an amputated finger or an amputed leg the answer will be straight forward. If it comes to a situation where you are unable to explain a specific social deficit symptomatic of mild Aspergers then there is no reason to draw on this as an excuse.

We tackle our limitations with available remedies be they therapies or drugs. If these limitations are not able to be modified and prevent us from succeeding socially then we have no choice but to live with our limitations. Trying to compare yourself to somebody worse off getting more slack will not change your specific predicament.



SammichEater
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01 Aug 2011, 2:22 am

Speaking from experience, a more accurate analogy would be eating brussel sprout flavored ice cream, looking for an strawberry. It's rare, but sometimes it happens.


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Artros
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01 Aug 2011, 3:04 am

Callista wrote:
But having a visible disability is no easier. When people know you are disabled because it's obvious, they underestimate you, assuming that you are basically incapable.


This is so true. One of my friends is in an electric wheelchair and it's kind of sad to see how people sometimes assume she's retarded or something.



Grisha
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01 Aug 2011, 8:58 am

Surfman wrote:
My view is to dress like an eccentric. It gives NT's a signal and they could act differently

Hair and mannerisms would need to fit, I guess you would need to change internally

NT's can suck anyways


I dress a bit eccentrically normally, and I think it helps in this regard - I seem to feel more comfortable being different if I look a little different too - nothing too outrageous though.

Some Aspies suck too, you should know better than to embrace sterotypes...