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Annmaria
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24 Aug 2011, 6:01 pm

If you have a problem with depth perception how does it effect one? In sport, academics, and everyday living. Thanks!


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SammichEater
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24 Aug 2011, 7:27 pm

Mostly with sports, and sometimes while driving. I haven't noticed it other than that.


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Franma
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24 Aug 2011, 7:38 pm

My 21 year old daughter has no depth perception. It took her until 4th grade to walk up stairs using one foot on each stair instead of like a toddler does. She still hesitates slightly and gets her bearings at the top of stairs and always holds the railing.

Her response to your question:

Stick to 2 dimensional sports - where things are safely on the ground and cannot hit you.
It effects driving but you get used to it. She describes feeling more "skittish" than other drivers.
Walking - be careful crossing the street
Don't run on stairs
Follow the same rules like don't run with scissors as everyone else but enforce them more strictly.
It doesn't effect academics except gym and recess.

From me as her Mom:

She caught a ball once in her entire life. She was 9. They were playing kickball at the park. While she was catching it, she fell into the chain link fence and and a loose piece of the fence went right through her knee. She smiled all the way to the hospital because she FINALLY caught the ball. The kids all clapped for her and still talk about the time she caught the ball.

She had a skateboard which she basically carried around as a fashion accessory for a few years because skateboarding was cool at the time and all her friends had one. One day she tried to use it on the small hill the kids use by the school (maybe 15 feet long). She missed jumping off in time for the curb. Ended up in that same hospital with them picking lots of gravel out of her legs and arms and had that same smile.

It can be frustrating and the victories can be bittersweet at times, but they are still victories. For the most part, as an adult, it doesn't bother her and she doesn't really think about it.


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Jory
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24 Aug 2011, 7:44 pm

I can’t even tell a damn difference when I cover one of my eyes.



LostUndergrad9090
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24 Aug 2011, 8:14 pm

Driving for sure.



Shivan
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24 Aug 2011, 8:18 pm

My depth perception is horrible, driving is the worst.


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JWS
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24 Aug 2011, 8:32 pm

I don't seem to have any problem with depth perception EXCEPT when I am walking toward something such as a clothesline. I have to put my hand out between myself and the clothesline (or any single line) to make sure I don't run into it.
I have suffered minor injuries before I figured out this simple technique. Either rope burn or knocking myself down because I didn't realize how close I'd gotten to it! :tongue:


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SammichEater
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24 Aug 2011, 8:32 pm

Jory wrote:
I can’t even tell a damn difference when I cover one of my eyes.


That's very interesting. I'm the only person I know who can't tell the difference, that is, until now.

I guess I must use perspective entirely to observe the dimension of depth.


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btbnnyr
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24 Aug 2011, 8:59 pm

I had an eye inflammation once when I couldn't see out of one eye at all, and there is a huge difference between having and not having depth perception. It's not the same as not noticing a difference when covering one of your eyes. That seems normal, because I can't tell any difference either. No depth perception is like total visual+motor dysfunction. I would try to pour water into a cup mere inches away and completely miss the cup.



WillMcC
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24 Aug 2011, 9:05 pm

For me, mostly sports - I could not catch a ball and took up bowling when I was in school. As for driving, I have no problems during the day, though sometimes driving at night can be difficult, especially when looking in the rear-view mirror to ensure that it is safe to change lanes, etc.
I used to believe that I had no depth perception, but I don't think that is completely true anymore - I've noticed some 3D effects in 3D movies and when playing with a Nintendo 3DS. Other times I can use parallax and reference points to determine distance - when riding a bike, for example, I can duck my head just in time to avoid a low branch.

My eyes have been a bit "off" ever since I was born, but I have adapted and can actually focus on objects using either eye


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MakaylaTheAspie
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24 Aug 2011, 9:18 pm

My depth perception isn't that bad.


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