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Wayne
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28 Aug 2011, 10:01 am

Callista wrote:
Yeah, I didn't mean you can't be both. Of course you can. It's just that autism can be mistaken for giftedness when giftedness (as defined by "significantly higher than average ability in most or all areas of development") is not actually present. This is a problem because autism means there are real impairments present and they can go unnoticed and unaccommodated when people think that you are "just a gifted child".

If you're autistic, you are probably simultaneously really good at some things and really bad at other things--even if those average out to the normal range. But if they see the "really good" skills and mistake you for gifted, that can be a problem, because they're not going to have a clue that the "really bad" skills even exist. Of course the opposite can happen--they just see the "really bad" areas and think you've got a global delay. Not good either way.


I see what you mean. I'm figuring now that I was considered "gifted" in school because my areas of strength overlapped almost exactly with what the school environment called for. Now that I'm out of school, I've still got those strengths and there's still opportunities to leverage them, but I've got plenty of weaknesses in areas that my current environment demands of me. Definitely knocked a lot of the spring out of my step, to say the least... and 15 years later, I'm still trying to get it back.



Callista
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28 Aug 2011, 11:08 am

I tend to call that sort of giftedness "being good at school"--it's more focused than the NT-gifted you see usually, but it sure is useful. Not that gifted NTs are all that neurotypical themselves; they do have unusual qualities, or they wouldn't be called gifted!


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Wayne
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28 Aug 2011, 11:49 am

Callista wrote:
I tend to call that sort of giftedness "being good at school"--it's more focused than the NT-gifted you see usually, but it sure is useful. Not that gifted NTs are all that neurotypical themselves; they do have unusual qualities, or they wouldn't be called gifted!


My middle son got tested for the gifted program.... they said he hit the IQ threshold, but didn't have any actual challenges related to it, so he wasn't actually considered "gifted". That was the first time I'd ever heard of "gifted" as something other than "awesomely smart".

Is this kind of what "unusual qualities" has to do with?



Tollorin
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30 Aug 2011, 12:03 am

Callista wrote:
Gifted typical kids tend to be socially gifted too, but it's not impossible, I guess, to have delayed social skills plus giftedness... honestly, though, that kind of a jagged skill profile generally makes me think "autism".

A lot of gifted kids don't interact well with other children of their age because of the difference of intelligence and interests. Some may think such social diffculties as coming from autism.

SammichEater wrote:
I've always had many of the characteristics of giftedness, but even when I'm around other intelligent people of my age, I just don't connect with them.

It may help a little though, as gifted aspies and gifteds without autism generally share some simillar geeky interests.

Tuttle wrote:
However, finding alternate methods to solve problems such as those in math is an aspie trait.

It's a gifted trait too.

Tuttle wrote:
As for whether math skills are an AS trait - I've found that aspies tend to be at the extremes much more often than NTs for math - both at the top and at the bottom. This only makes me want to teach aspies math more.

Sometime I wonder if being good at math (Outside of fast calculation, I talking about a more abstract level.) while asperger would come in fact from giftedness, and that giftedness in math would "overide' the lost of math abstraction abilities we frequently see from aspies. those good in math on WP are part of the "smart" crowd.

It would mean that I'm myself "gifted". :wink:
Or maybe not... Just a idea like that.