Ever get mistaken for a foreigner in your own country?

Page 2 of 4 [ 48 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

Fnord
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 40,532
Location: Stendec

10 Sep 2011, 10:42 am

Hev pessed for Roshan city zen on meny okay shunz vith chust chenj in eksent. Ez goot, da?

;)

Around the Los Angeles area, it's easy to pass for another nationality with very little effort. Unfortunately, it's just as easy to become "outted" by a real person of that nationality, as well.


_________________
 
“I must acknowledge, once and for all, that the
purpose of diplomacy is to prolong a crisis.”

— Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock, in the Star Trek
episode "The Mark of Gideon" (ep. 3-16, 1969)


DerStadtschutz
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 5 Sep 2011
Age: 33
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,467

10 Sep 2011, 1:31 pm

nemorosa wrote:
Not quite in answer to the question, but I was pulled into the thread by "foreigner in your own country".

I've felt increasing a foreigner in my own country as the years roll by and the things change, the people change and the culture and language changes. I don't feel as though I belong in it any more.

But no, never been mistaken for being from somewhere else.


I've felt like that almost my entire life. I've never understood how or why people get so caught up in things like sports, reality shows, celebrities' lives, etc. I've pretty much always felt like I was Jane Goodall, studying a colony(or whatever the hell they call the groups)of gorillas, and I feel more and more that way the longer I live.



Keeno
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Mar 2006
Age: 44
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,948
Location: Earth

10 Sep 2011, 1:38 pm

I have been, numerous times. For example, a shopkeeper asking if was used to the weather here, after asking where I was from. And another shopkeeper who told me "Welcome to xxxxxxxx". And numerous guys who made conversation in the toilets of bars who said I didn't seem like someone of this country's nationality. And someone who threatened me at a bus stop, because apparently I was a particular nationality. So I know the feeling, often in an ethnocentric, nationalistic way. Sorry to be vague about location, but I have decided to adopt a policy of geographical anonymity on this site, though some people might remember from previous posts.



joestenr
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 22 Apr 2011
Age: 43
Gender: Male
Posts: 318
Location: niantic connecticut

10 Sep 2011, 1:52 pm

I was told by a west indian woman at work that i didnt strike her as an american, i took it as a complement.

Btw, im also in CT.


_________________
to be lost I would have needed to know where I was going

"For success in science or art, a dash of autism is essential"
Hans Asperger


Ai_Ling
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 15 Nov 2010
Age: 31
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,901

10 Sep 2011, 4:20 pm

Kinda...Im from Hawaii, we have a very distinct local culture. I get mistakened all the time that Im from another state. Occasionally a foreigner. So not quite another country. But oddly enough, when I was in california for school, people thought I was from there.



VMSmith
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Apr 2011
Age: 28
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,737
Location: the old country

10 Sep 2011, 9:28 pm

i do because im lebanese australian. i also get mistaken for other ethnic/racial backgrounds (french, spanish, indian, etc). conversations follow the same structure as yours:
them: so where are you from?
me: the shire...
them: no i mean really
me: i really do live there...
them: where are your parents from?
its quite racist really, i mean why is it that you are only considered a real australian if you are caucasian? especially if you consider that the country is made up almost entirely of migrants and if you discount first settlers then thats still a lot of migrants.



nirrti_rachelle
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator

User avatar

Joined: 21 Jul 2005
Age: 44
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,369
Location: The Dirty South

10 Sep 2011, 11:46 pm

People tend to think I'm from Africa or some Caribbean island even though I've been in the southern part of the United States since I was born. They say that I have an accent and carry myself differently from all the "local yokels".

I'll take that as a complement. :wink:


_________________
"There is difference and there is power. And who holds the power decides the meaning of the difference." --June Jordan


DarrylZero
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Jun 2009
Age: 45
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,726

11 Sep 2011, 12:49 am

Not quite a foreigner, but on more than one occasion people have said they thought I was from the Midwest. They're usually surprised to learn I was born and raised in Southern California.



Tuttle
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Mar 2006
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,172
Location: Massachusetts

11 Sep 2011, 1:05 am

I'm often asked where I'm from, or where my accent is from. I keep being confused by this because I live within a half hour of where I grew up.



Amik
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Feb 2008
Age: 37
Gender: Female
Posts: 742

11 Sep 2011, 12:06 pm

I get mistaken for a foreigner all the time, but I'm not sure if it's because my mannerisms seem different or because people have overheard me speak a foreign language or seen me with foreigners before (I hang out with immigrants more than natives). It's probably a bit of both.

I have noticed that I get along better with foreigners though, both with foreigners in my own country and as a foreigner in other countries. People tend to be less uncomfortable and more accepting of me being different when they think it's just a cultural difference rather than a neurodifference, so they actually give me a chance and get to know me rather than get uncomfortable and avoid me.



naturalplastic
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Aug 2010
Age: 64
Gender: Male
Posts: 21,737
Location: temperate zone

11 Sep 2011, 10:03 pm

Am an American, but there was a period in my 20's In which folks thought I was either British or Canadian.


I had my hair styled in bangs ( like a 'british rock star- some said), and listened to the Who, and watched so much Monty Python that apparently it all rubbed off on me and folks I met would say that I looked and sounded like a brit.

A young lady customer I helped on the store phone asked if I was canadian because I sounded like her boyfriend ( shoulda told her that 'for YOU I can be Canadian").



shrox
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 11 Aug 2011
Age: 55
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,355
Location: OK let's go.

11 Sep 2011, 10:07 pm

People often think I am from Europe. But when I was in England, they could tell I was an American from six blocks away.



blackberryplum
Butterfly
Butterfly

User avatar

Joined: 24 Sep 2011
Age: 47
Gender: Female
Posts: 12

05 Oct 2011, 4:55 pm

I am a sub teacher and the students always ask me where I am from. I live 245 miles in the south from where I grew up. Until I found out about asp dx, I thought I talked proper. Black people said I sound like a "white girl". Now, I believe the weird sound of voice has to do with the aspie traits. I remember black friends who I always thought talked proper used to tell me that they would always remember my voice.



sunshower
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Aug 2006
Age: 119
Gender: Female
Posts: 4,496

05 Oct 2011, 7:55 pm

Yes.


_________________
Into the dark...


Sibyl
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 10 Jul 2009
Age: 75
Gender: Female
Posts: 597
Location: Kansas

05 Oct 2011, 10:46 pm

I get mistaken for a New Yorker, right here in this part of Kansas. I came home to this house from the hospital as a newborn, and five of my eight great-grandparents are buried in this county (all four grandparents). Probably just the speed with which I talk when I get wound up, though the PhD Doctor who evaluated me said that I speak in an academic style, so that might help too -- though I don't get the impression that New Yorkers are all that academic.