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yamato_rena
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19 Oct 2011, 9:45 pm

Hey, I was wondering if anyone happens to know of any research on autism and other learning disorders in the workplace (representation, experience, etc). I'm helping out someone who's interested in workforce diversity advocacy, and since I have (at least a tiny bit of) experience around here and with learning disorders in general, I'm trying to get some of the research that's out there for her. Any help would be super-appreciated! :D



vermontsavant
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20 Oct 2011, 12:52 pm

specificly what information do you need


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Percy
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20 Oct 2011, 1:41 pm

Iv'e always felt we need more people with Aspergers in government. :)



Azagthoth
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20 Oct 2011, 1:53 pm

Percy wrote:
Iv'e always felt we need more people with Aspergers in government. :)


Why? We are not normal, and therefore, are out of touch with the masses.



Percy
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20 Oct 2011, 2:01 pm

Yes - But diversity is important. Also we would be interested in the small issues no one else care about.



Azagthoth
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20 Oct 2011, 2:03 pm

Percy wrote:
Yes - But diversity is important. Also we would be interested in the small issues no one else care about.


Trust me. Putting disabled people in government is a bad idea. The government is in rough enough shape as it is.



Percy
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20 Oct 2011, 2:07 pm

Isn't that a reason to try it? No one has tried Aspergocracy before.



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20 Oct 2011, 2:13 pm

Percy wrote:
Isn't that a reason to try it? No one has tried Aspergocracy before.


Then Aspies can create their nation. But the people should not have to be subjected to their whim.



Gedrene
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20 Oct 2011, 3:47 pm

Azagthoth wrote:
Percy wrote:
Yes - But diversity is important. Also we would be interested in the small issues no one else care about.


Trust me. Putting disabled people in government is a bad idea. The government is in rough enough shape as it is.


Don't call me disabled. If I was so disabled as you claim I would actually be unable to do things that actually mattered. As for disabled people, last time I checked people who need wheelcairs are disabled and I wouldn't call Roosevelt bad for the government when he was disabled by polio.



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20 Oct 2011, 4:39 pm

Gedrene wrote:
Azagthoth wrote:
Percy wrote:
Yes - But diversity is important. Also we would be interested in the small issues no one else care about.


Trust me. Putting disabled people in government is a bad idea. The government is in rough enough shape as it is.


Don't call me disabled. If I was so disabled as you claim I would actually be unable to do things that actually mattered. As for disabled people, last time I checked people who need wheelcairs are disabled and I wouldn't call Roosevelt bad for the government when he was disabled by polio.


I worked for the government for 23 years, there are more people with autistic traits that work for the government than anyone could probably imagine. Many don't seek a diagnosis, but without their skills government would come to a halt. Government is all about regulations and systemization, no there aren't too many autistic traits among politicians, but they are just figureheads, the one's that do the real work are comprised of many with autistic traits.

In any profession where the need for systemization skills is strong one will see autistic traits: engineers, scientists, law enforcement, lawyers, IT, accountants, judges, mechanics, artists, musicans, doctors, novelists, journalists, there are probably hundreds of others. Concentrations of autistic diagnosis of children have been found in both the technology rich area of silicon valley and the area that surrounds the Massachussetts Institute of Technology.

There isn't much research into it, because so many of these individuals are not concerned that their autistic traits are a detriment to them; instead they rely on them for their livelyhood. The only thing that sets many of them apart from a diagnosis, would probably be that they function in life without any significant impairments that hold them back. Beyond that it is not likely that many would ever seek a diagnosis, any way.

People like to speculate on who is famous that might be autistic, all these other people just go on about their business with little notice from anyone other than comments about what they do for a living, and how it matches their personality type.

While there are some people with learning disorders on the autism spectrum, it's not indicative of the entire spectrum. There are probably government resources available on the internet that follow up on individuals that have learning disorders in special education classes, that could provide statistics on where these individuals are employed after they leave school.

There are definitely programs that exist that attempt to mainstream them in the work world. They often start out highly supervised, and end up moving into the mainstream world with opportunities in the service industry.

Some of these people are autistic, but they have a wide variety of learning disorders, that aren't necessarily associated with autism.



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20 Oct 2011, 4:58 pm

Gedrene wrote:
Azagthoth wrote:
Percy wrote:
Yes - But diversity is important. Also we would be interested in the small issues no one else care about.


Trust me. Putting disabled people in government is a bad idea. The government is in rough enough shape as it is.


Don't call me disabled. If I was so disabled as you claim I would actually be unable to do things that actually mattered. As for disabled people, last time I checked people who need wheelcairs are disabled and I wouldn't call Roosevelt bad for the government when he was disabled by polio.


You need to update your vernacular. Also, you are derailing the topic by pointing to inconsequential matters, such as Roosevelt. I'll be nice and leave it at that.

aghogday wrote:
Many don't seek a diagnosis, but without their skills government would come to a halt.


How do you know they are aspies, then? Why are we so special as to prop up the government?



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20 Oct 2011, 6:23 pm

Azagthoth wrote:
Gedrene wrote:
Azagthoth wrote:
Percy wrote:
Yes - But diversity is important. Also we would be interested in the small issues no one else care about.


Trust me. Putting disabled people in government is a bad idea. The government is in rough enough shape as it is.


Don't call me disabled. If I was so disabled as you claim I would actually be unable to do things that actually mattered. As for disabled people, last time I checked people who need wheelcairs are disabled and I wouldn't call Roosevelt bad for the government when he was disabled by polio.


You need to update your vernacular. Also, you are derailing the topic by pointing to inconsequential matters, such as Roosevelt. I'll be nice and leave it at that.

aghogday wrote:
Many don't seek a diagnosis, but without their skills government would come to a halt.


How do you know they are aspies, then? Why are we so special as to prop up the government?


Aspie is a small part of the autism spectrum, the autism spectrum is a small part of the broader phenotype of autism, and recent research shows that close to 30 percent of the population has at least some autistic traits.

The government is a system, and it takes systemizers to run a system. Politicians don't worry about this type of thing, the worker bees take care of the actual gears that move the country.

A diagnosis of Aspergers requires one to have an impairment in an important area of life functioning, it's not likely that many of these individuals that work in government service have any diagnosis what so ever, because they live a structured life, however they have in common similiar traits that come with autism because of their systemizing skills.

The majority of people that work in government may have only one trait of autism or none, but some have more.

An actual "NT" person may be much rarer than what may seem to be the case, simply because so many people with autistic traits blend in seamlessly in niches that they adapt well to.

Put them in Walmart or McDonalds in front of a cash register, and they might not last a week.



yamato_rena
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20 Oct 2011, 7:24 pm

vermontsavant wrote:
specificly what information do you need


Wow, this thread has spun off quite a bit before I noticed any responses. Research on representation statistics, benefits to companies, difficulties for companies, how the hiring process would discriminate for and against, potential solutions to such discrimination. It's a pretty broad area, and I'm just trying to get a sample of the availability of the research. Although aghogday, you say it's probably not available at all?

I agree with aghogday on aspies in the government. The federal government actually has programs in place to encourage the hiring of workers with many disabilities, including the autistic spectrum. I'm trying to seek a job through one of them right now - the Workforce Recruitment Program. Part of the reason they seek out people with disabilities is because they are just as capable of doing the job properly as others. Our government has definite issues right now, but it's in the political realm, not the bureaucratic one. I don't think someone on the autistic spectrum would do particularly well as a politician - that's an NT field if there ever was one - but as a chief of staff or an advisor, one could make a huge difference.



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20 Oct 2011, 8:04 pm

yamato_rena wrote:
vermontsavant wrote:
specificly what information do you need


Wow, this thread has spun off quite a bit before I noticed any responses. Research on representation statistics, benefits to companies, difficulties for companies, how the hiring process would discriminate for and against, potential solutions to such discrimination. It's a pretty broad area, and I'm just trying to get a sample of the availability of the research. Although aghogday, you say it's probably not available at all?

I agree with aghogday on aspies in the government. The federal government actually has programs in place to encourage the hiring of workers with many disabilities, including the autistic spectrum. I'm trying to seek a job through one of them right now - the Workforce Recruitment Program. Part of the reason they seek out people with disabilities is because they are just as capable of doing the job properly as others. Our government has definite issues right now, but it's in the political realm, not the bureaucratic one. I don't think someone on the autistic spectrum would do particularly well as a politician - that's an NT field if there ever was one - but as a chief of staff or an advisor, one could make a huge difference.


The amount of job protection against discrimination is incredible compared to the private sector. I'm not sure I would of lasted in any other structure. Unless they can prove you are not doing your job, and will not correct your mistakes, you are fairly safe.

The same cannot be said about hardly any other job, anymore in the private sector, in many states a reason doesn't have to be given at all, to let someone go.

It's hard to get a job with the government, but you don't have to necessarily be a social butterfly to last a long time in a position there if you land one.

On the other hand once you get in the system, it's like having golden handcuffs, regardless of what happens, it's hard to leave once you have put some years in, because of the long term benefits, that one can potentially gained.



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21 Oct 2011, 7:05 am

i would say the workplace is very rough but i dont have any statistics or research on the matter.i have started my own business,if that doesnt work i dont see myself going to work or anyone else.i would probably go for ssi at that point


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21 Oct 2011, 7:23 am

Azagthoth wrote:
Gedrene wrote:
Azagthoth wrote:
Percy wrote:
Yes - But diversity is important. Also we would be interested in the small issues no one else care about.


Trust me. Putting disabled people in government is a bad idea. The government is in rough enough shape as it is.


Don't call me disabled. If I was so disabled as you claim I would actually be unable to do things that actually mattered. As for disabled people, last time I checked people who need wheelcairs are disabled and I wouldn't call Roosevelt bad for the government when he was disabled by polio.


You need to update your vernacular. Also, you are derailing the topic by pointing to inconsequential matters, such as Roosevelt. I'll be nice and leave it at that.


Inconsequential? Was Roosevelt disabled when he was in a wheelchair? Can you answer this truthfully? Or are you gonna try some babying tactic?