no education, no experience, no transportation

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hanyo
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03 Nov 2011, 9:12 am

In a way I almost want to get a job but I don't see how it's even possible for me to get one. I don't drive or have anyone to drive me places so any job I'd get I'd have to be able to walk there or take the bus. I have literally nothing to put for education or experience. I don't have any references. I can't work with customers all day as it would stress me too much because of social anxiety. I don't know what to do.

My entire past work history was a paper route that lasted 2 weeks when I was 19 and a cleaning job that lasted about a month over 10 years ago. I didn't even have to interview for these jobs. I only did one interview ever for a fast food place and they didn't hire me.

I'm starting to worry a little because when I finally get to move (I'm on a list) my rent will go way up so money will be tighter than ever. I live with my mother and am supported by her but when she is gone what will happen to me?



FaeryEthereal
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03 Nov 2011, 1:54 pm

Hi hanyo, I can relate somewhat. Ok, what kind of area do you live in? Urban or rural? Is there good public transport? What are you passionate about, what are your special interests? Is there anything that you would love to do? (However unrealistic it may seem) I would suggest thinking about being self employed depending on your interests.



glamourdollxoxo
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03 Nov 2011, 3:24 pm

I would contact your state department of human services because they can help you if you are on the spectrum and are unable to support yourself. I know my state offers job training and things like that. So I would contact your states human services as step one and go from there.



CaptainTrips222
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03 Nov 2011, 9:26 pm

You have no choice but to get some kind of social assistance. Your work history is all but certain to thwart you from finding a job. You can volunteer to stay productive while on SSI, or even take a small part time job, but you have to find some kind of program to assist people on the spectrum.



CaptainTrips222
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03 Nov 2011, 9:27 pm

You have no choice but to get some kind of social assistance. Your work history is all but certain to thwart you from finding a job. You can volunteer to stay productive while on SSI, or even take a small part time job, but you have to find some kind of program to assist people on the spectrum.



shrox
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03 Nov 2011, 9:55 pm

glamourdollxoxo wrote:
I would contact your state department of human services because they can help you if you are on the spectrum and are unable to support yourself. I know my state offers job training and things like that. So I would contact your states human services as step one and go from there.



If you live in the USA and your mother receives Social Security, you might be able to have that transferred to you when she does pass. Not fun to think about about, but you really should.



hanyo
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04 Nov 2011, 3:49 am

shrox wrote:
If you live in the USA and your mother receives Social Security, you might be able to have that transferred to you when she does pass. Not fun to think about about, but you really should.


My mother doesn't get social security yet and is under 60. She can't even retire for 9 more years I think.

Yesterday I did discover that you can apply for ssi online and did that. At least that will get me started. There was no way I was going to walk to the social security building and apply there. I should really apply to medicaid too but I haven't been able to bring myself to go to the welfare.

I only started thinking about this recently but ever since I was in grade school I've had people telling me "your mother isn't going to be around to take care of you forever."

My mother seems to think I could just go out and get a job but if asked where and how she can't really give me an answer. She knows I'm quiet and antisocial and barely leave the house.



Ksim
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07 Nov 2011, 12:38 am

Heh in some respects it sounds a bit like me a few years ago.
I kinda turned myself around though and have done some pretty interesting things since I was in that period.

My advice to you would be to go to community college for a year or two. Don't worry about going to university or anything.
Just get your GED (Or GCSE's) and improve your grades. That will give you something of a start whilst receiving social security.
Also I'd advise asking your mother to stay with her for a bit longer. Say you want to improve your education in order to better your chances at getting a job.
This can be done.

As for not driving - public transportation is fine. I prefer using buses, trains, planes etc anyway.
I mean driving is a luxury of the past. Its expensive to drive these days. Think about fuel costs, insurance, tax, etc.
Its far more affordable to buy a bus ticket. You can do this when going to college.



hanyo
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07 Nov 2011, 4:35 am

I'm going to be living with my mother for the rest of her life.

I do already have my ged. I'm good at test taking and just went and got it a long time ago when I was 18 or 19.

I tried community college once but didn't even manage to last one semester. It's hard for me leaving the house every day and there were other things I had trouble with.



Ksim
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07 Nov 2011, 7:05 pm

hanyo wrote:
I'm going to be living with my mother for the rest of her life.

I do already have my ged. I'm good at test taking and just went and got it a long time ago when I was 18 or 19.

I tried community college once but didn't even manage to last one semester. It's hard for me leaving the house every day and there were other things I had trouble with.


When I did community college, I quite enjoyed it.
Well let me ask you a question. Why will you live with your Mother for the rest of her life?
You don't have to be uber-successful but you could put a smile on your Mother's face and others by
doing something in the long run. It dosen't have to be anything extravagant but leaving the house, getting confident
in dealing with people for a short period and then going back home.

Maybe you could join a place where you can develop a hobby and talk with a few people about that hobby?
People aren't too bothered with social norms when they discuss a hobby.
Trying something to begin with and build it up from there? Just a thought.



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09 Nov 2011, 1:34 am

You're 36 and you have no work history. There's a reason for that, and it's likely a good one. I understand that, and I respect that.

Housing is important. Your mom is a great resource. And the people that keep nagging you about when she dies, they are scumbags.

Explore all your options. You think welfare is a dirty word. It's fine. Maybe your best shot, and I hereby give you permission to explore that option.

Finding a job. Every fast food place near where you live. Walk in the door and ask the first employee if they're hiring. If it's a no, just keep walking. One will say yes, and there's an application, and hopefully an interview. And you're still walking, until you find a place that will hire you.

You are the person they want. Some guy with a college degree will be out of there quick. You could fit right in, maybe working as a cook in the back. The cash register is pretty easy to work too, because it's all scripted.

Good experiences. And your mom is there in the mean time.



Redd
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18 Nov 2011, 12:08 am

Man I really feel for you. I'm still young and my work history already hinders me. I'm AWFUL at interviews too but what works for me is staffing agency's. they'll basically take anybody and they do all the leg work for you... hell they got me the job I have now which I really really enjoy. So yea that's the best input I can offer is seek out your local staffing agency or recruiting service (the terms are usually interchangeable). I'm sorry you have had such a bad experience with work. I did too until this year. SSI might work and all but in my state I have yet to find any reason to believe that they consider a person who is autistic disabled unless they are on the very far side of the spectrum but your state may be different, such is the benefit of our federal system.



Dantac
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19 Nov 2011, 10:15 pm

You could also receive free skill training in night schools and other gov. funded workforce programs. Whatever issues you have there may be some occupation you could function in that they offer training on.

If you have the guts for it you could also try to set up your own home business. You've the internet...maybe find a way to buy things in bulk for cheap, market them somehow and sell them through e-bay or something of the sort.