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LeoAspie
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15 Nov 2011, 10:16 pm

We are reading Moby Dick in English class and frankly I have no idea how to get through it in one piece. I already use Sparknotes but it doesn't help me much.

We got the audio version from the library but it is just as boring, if not more, than the text version.

Did any of you have to read Moby Dick, and if so, how did you get through it?

Thanks!



Claradoon
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15 Nov 2011, 11:31 pm

It's my favourite book. I've read it 6 times since I was 14. (I'm 61yo). But look, if it doesn't click with you, then it just wasn't meant to be. Or maybe later in life but not now. Maybe you're lucky, because school can kill a book.

Anyway, as an egg-head who has not only read Moby-Dick but also read other books about it, I recommend that you get the movie with Gregory Peck, made in 1956, screenplay by Ray Bradbury.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0049513/

I know there's a new version but I haven't seen it so I don't know what to say. The 1956 movie is really close to reading the book.



LeoAspie
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16 Nov 2011, 8:34 pm

Thanks! I'll do my best ^_^

When you said "egg-head", you reminded me of Haroun and the Sea of Stories. Have you read that?



ViewUpHere
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16 Nov 2011, 8:43 pm

Moby Dick makes interesting reading for a couple of reasons, one of which is all the information on cetatians. If that's not your cup of tea, those chapters will bore you out of your skull. Another reason is that Melville started with a central character, but then decided he really wanted to focus on someone else. Rather than go back and re-write, he killed off his initial central character and just kept going. From a writing standpoint it's a really curious read.

Claradoon, thanks for the info on the Gregory Peck version of the movie. I had no clue Ray Bradbury wrote that screenplay. Super cool!



Claradoon
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16 Nov 2011, 9:15 pm

LeoAspie wrote:
Thanks! I'll do my best ^_^

When you said "egg-head", you reminded me of Haroun and the Sea of Stories. Have you read that?


Wow! No I haven't, but my library has it, and I can probably get it tomorrow. I *love* getting a recommended book. You liked it, right?

Keep in touch, I'm dying to know how this turns out for you. Also - everybody take note! Moby-Dick has a hyphen. :lol:



Claradoon
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16 Nov 2011, 9:22 pm

ViewUpHere wrote:
Moby Dick makes interesting reading for a couple of reasons, one of which is all the information on cetatians. If that's not your cup of tea, those chapters will bore you out of your skull. Another reason is that Melville started with a central character, but then decided he really wanted to focus on someone else. Rather than go back and re-write, he killed off his initial central character and just kept going. From a writing standpoint it's a really curious read.

Claradoon, thanks for the info on the Gregory Peck version of the movie. I had no clue Ray Bradbury wrote that screenplay. Super cool!


Yes, Moby-Dick is all over the place, wandering in a wonderful kind of way. At the time the critics rejected it as "the ravings of a disordered mind." (re time-machine, add lit critics to list of people to smack.)

I was surprised about Bradbury too. I think he wrote a book about how to write a book, and in that book he tells about writing the screenplay, which he did in Ireland at the instance of the world-famous director whose name escapes me, and Bradbury hated Ireland because he's more a sunshine kind of guy. He couldn't wait to leave. But later, much later, he wrote a book of Irish stories - he thought he'd never think of Ireland again but it eventually became a book. And that book is good, too, if you haven't read it. Very funny.

I have been criticized for my lack of Proper Nouns. Sorry about that!



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16 Nov 2011, 9:23 pm

LeoAspie, at what level are you studying, and how much time are they giving to Moby-Dick?