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do you like Heavy metal music
Yes, 37%  37%  [ 103 ]
Yes, 42%  42%  [ 118 ]
no, 10%  10%  [ 28 ]
no, 11%  11%  [ 31 ]
Total votes : 280

cberg
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06 Jan 2015, 10:33 pm

I'm pretty sure Serj was operatically trained. I guess considering the wide audience that appreciated them you could say pop although I always found them at least somewhat on the heavy side. Even my mom liked System when I introduced her XD...


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rapidroy
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07 Jan 2015, 12:42 am

mr_bigmouth_502 wrote:
rapidroy wrote:
mr_bigmouth_502 wrote:
Feyokien wrote:
Sort of I guess, I think the better question is can my ears handle it. I really dislike growling but I really like the instrumental parts, but as long as the bass isn't overwhelming. I kind of like Opeth. I also occasionally listen to some folk and symphonic metal as well. Most days I listen to prog, alternative, and soundtrack/symphony though.


I've noticed that a lot of music nowadays overuses what I call "wall of sound"-style production, where everything is so densely packed together that it's hard to savor individual notes or other little details. It's not just a problem with metal, it's a problem with ALL genres nowadays. I like it when the individual parts of a song are allowed to have some "breathing room", instead of everything being LOUD all the time.

Nightwish is an example of a band that I think could hire a better producer. Their music has some epic instrumentals and arrangements, but their crescendos could be so much more dramatic if they didn't use as much compression. As well, you're not really supposed to use much compression for symphonic music in the first place, so while I could see the use for it in symphonic metal, it doesn't mean a symphonic metal record should be produced like a death metal or metalcore record.


I find metal can be a fatiguing genre to listen to sometimes, mainly after extended periods and when physically feeling a little off. It takes a considerable more mental concentration to take in and break down what I am hearing compared to your typical easy listening type of performer. The thing with the constant wall of sound is it becomes easy to forget just how heavy the music is after an extended period, like your ears kind of adjust to what your hearing? The same thing happens when driving fast on a freeway, you get used to constantly going 100km/h when you head for an exit and slow down to 50km/h yet it feels like 5km/h, naturally many people crash because they take the exits too fast because they can't properly sense the speed until they get used to driving at varying speeds again. Young Drivers invented a word for that in velocitizing(sp?). Anyway I wonder if the same thing doesn't happen when taking in sound waves.


Have you ever heard about this thing called the "loudness war"? Basically, it refers to this ongoing trend in music production, where producers will try to master songs as loudly as possible, so that they stand out more on the radio and leave a bigger first impression. The problem with "loudness war" production is that it not only deteriorates the overall dynamics and sound quality of the music, it also leads to listener fatigue with prolonged exposure.

I like heavy, intense music, and even I find a lot of metal albums hard to listen to because their lack of dynamics becomes grating after a while. Dynamics and variety are what give music its liveliness. For this reason, I typically prefer older music that hasn't had the life squeezed or of it.

Now, I will admit, loud production does work for certain things, when used the right way. Merzbow, a Japanese noise artist once made an album with some of the loudest music ever printed on a CD, this album is called "Venereology". It is an incredibly intense listening experience, and most people would not enjoy it, but I consider it to be a masterpiece. It's not something I can listen to every day though. Another example would be System of A Down, they just wouldn't sound the same without their obnoxiously loud production.
Un aware of the term however I had noticed its effects, although most radio stations seem to equalize the volumes so all it did was make those recordings sound awful. Likely one of the many reasons I prefer live recordings because to me they sound better in that raw form. I don't buy a lot of studio metal records because they often suck at household volumes.

Compression as an effect period can really suck the life out of music and I wish more novice musicians would realise this. Or learn to play so they could turn it off.



mr_bigmouth_502
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08 Jan 2015, 3:49 am

^The "volume equalization" you speak of is in fact compression, and I do find it odd that producers of popular music continue to apply absurd amounts of compression to their recordings in spite of this. I think one reason why it's so widely used is because it's useful for listening in noisy environments like cars, where you really can't appreciate all the dynamics of the music over things like the noise of the road, the engine, etc. Another reason is simply because people have grown used to it, most people not knowing or caring about things like sound quality or the "loudness war". I know a number of people who are perfectly content with low bitrate mp3s and YouTube uploads.

Compression isn't all bad, but it isn't all good either. Small amounts can help emphasize less noticeable details, and large amounts can completely destroy sound quality. Compressors can also be used as an "effect", to distort the crap out of different things to make neat sounds, like what a lot of industrial bands do.



cberg
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08 Jan 2015, 4:48 am

Not me, I'm a fidelity freak. I've got a Cowon i9 portable FLAC/OGG/vbr player, Grado cans for listening at home and keep 2 sets of desk speakers on a splitter to marginalize the fuzz. I won't claim to be quite as particular about metal however... it can be really difficult to find in lossless codecs or on CD so I tend to cop out to YouTube :/

I find interesting effects can be produced by messing with just about any mixdown parameters. Compression sure served Rage Against The Machine & Rammstein quite well...


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mr_bigmouth_502
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08 Jan 2015, 7:54 pm

cberg wrote:
Not me, I'm a fidelity freak. I've got a Cowon i9 portable FLAC/OGG/vbr player, Grado cans for listening at home and keep 2 sets of desk speakers on a splitter to marginalize the fuzz. I won't claim to be quite as particular about metal however... it can be really difficult to find in lossless codecs or on CD so I tend to cop out to YouTube :/

I find interesting effects can be produced by messing with just about any mixdown parameters. Compression sure served Rage Against The Machine & Rammstein quite well...


I only wish I had a setup as good as yours. My audio hardware isn't the greatest, though it is enough that I can tell the difference between MP3 and FLAC. MP3s tend to cut out some of the bass frequencies and push the peaks into clipping range, even at 320kbps. The overall quality difference for casual listening is marginal overall, but I like the idea of having something closer to what the artist originally intended, rather than a lower-quality facsimile. Most of my music is in MP3 format though because they are much easier to find than FLAC files, and back when I was more ignorant about audio formats, I ended up ripping a lot of my CDs to MP3 and never bothered to get around to re-ripping them to FLAC.

I agree, the different techniques used in mixing and mastering processes do make it possible to create all sorts of interesting effects that wouldn't be possible live. Compression can be a good thing if it is used the right way, and even outright clipping can sound cool under the right circumstances as well.



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08 Jan 2015, 9:15 pm

rapidroy wrote:
A lot of the local bands identify as hardcore or thrash. I honestly don't pay attention to labels though. I can have a hard time drawing the line between hard rock and metal however the clearly metal sounding guitar and drums appear to the popular setup at the moment and I can recognize that. As for Ozzy what I mean is nobody around here is trying to be the prince of darkness or even a rock star and the lyrics don't seem to follow Ozzys lead, if anything it is the backup band that influences the more. I see no 80s hair metal influence either and Metallica appears to have fallen on deaf ears a lot of the current generation of kids(thankfully hate them!).


There is a lot of metal influenced music, seems to also be infused with that hardcore, but neither genre will 'claim' it so to speak, I think its sort of its own genre...on ocassion I like band that fit within that group like admittedly I kinda liked/like(if they are still active don't really follow them) avenged sevenfold I could even hear a bit of Iron Maiden influence which makes it hard to dislike I used to be avidly anti-core but to be fair there are bands within that who aren't bad at all. Also though depends on what all you're exposed to there is a lot that certainly Sabbath influence and lots of bands have thrash influence there are still bands that just play plain thrash metal. But its not really what's popular as far as extreme music of today. Also though I would say Children of Bodom has some hair metal influence, the lead singer guitarist even says that is what influenced him to play metal and they're melodic death metal for the most part.

I have also seen plenty of band pages where Ozzy is listed as an influence....and Metallica in my opinion released some good stuff but they've gone downhill in my opinion.


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