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SylviaLynn
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08 Dec 2011, 12:25 pm

Is your daughter good at physical control? Does she squeal or make other sounds that might hurt an animal's ears? That's another factor to consider in choosing a dog. Small dogs tend to be skittish with small children, especially those who are loud, rough, or unpredictable. They are also a bit more breakable, and the dog knows it. You might check with therapy dog organizations or trainers. They may know someone with a dog, or have ideas for you.


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Aspie 176/200 NT 34/200 Very likely an Aspie
AQ 41
Not diagnosed, but the shoe fits
10 yo dd on the spectrum


incorrigible
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08 Dec 2011, 4:32 pm

Your daughter sounds a lot like mine. The trick was not as much breed as age, with us. We found an old, calm dog. He's part black lab and part great dane. He will still run and play with the kids when they want but he is SO gentle with my daughter. After a couple years with him, she isn't timid with other dogs anymore either. It's been great for both the kids. =D


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historysmystery61
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05 Jul 2013, 7:03 pm

The breed doesn't say anything. Any dog can do anything. My dog, Tessie, is half husky but doesn't have much energy at all. Plus she barks once a year, jumps no more than once a month (and even then only on full-grown adults) and is well-behaved and listens to all of her commands. I met her six months before we got her. She isn't a registered service dog, because she came from my brother and hasn't had the necessary training to be "official," but she knows exactly what I need. She will stay within inches of me if I'm having a bad day. In return, I give her biscuits, the occasional Beggin' Strip, lots of love, and freedom from her fear of fireworks.



ASDsmom
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05 Jul 2013, 8:45 pm

Where did this thread come from? I'm currently applying for a service dog in my area .. if my landlord will ok it. Apparently it's illegal for him to say no but I haven't looked into the legal part of it yet. I'll have to read this entire thread now.. :)



TiredMom
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06 Jul 2013, 12:58 pm

A dog can just be a HUGE comfort to an aspie kid. We have a large, loud, excitable Labrador, but my daughter adores him, he sleeps with her every night, and is basically her best friend. When she was hospitalized for anxiety and depression this year,she missed him terribly, and the best days for her were the days the therapy dogs came to the unit (unfortunately only happened twice). I can imagine that some dogs are more suitable for kids on the spectrum than others (maybe King Charles spaniels?), but any dog that your kid grows up with and loves can do major good.
Cats, too, for that matter. My daughter can get through a meltdown by stroking the cat.