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What's your poison?
Ubuntu 41%  41%  [ 15 ]
Debian 16%  16%  [ 6 ]
Fedora 8%  8%  [ 3 ]
OpenSUSE 3%  3%  [ 1 ]
Slackware 5%  5%  [ 2 ]
Other (please post and tell us more) 27%  27%  [ 10 ]
Total votes : 37

Orwell
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31 Dec 2011, 12:09 pm

scubasteve wrote:
AstroGeek wrote:
Asp-Z wrote:
Unity is crap, use apt-get to install Gnome then select Gnome Classic at login. On a netbook you should get better performance from that too.

MATE is pretty good too, but is still a work in progress. You have to add some repos to get all of the features, some of which are still experimental.


I'm pretty fed up with both Unity and Gnome 3. Is MATE stable enough for general home use? Any difference running it in Mint vs. Arch?

Here's one advantage of my "outdated" Debian system. I've still got Gnome 2.30 with support for the next couple years until someone else gets around to writing a workable desktop environment. KDE4 is almost usable by now, so it should be good enough when I finally have to leave Squeeze. Or maybe Gnome3 will suck less by then.


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Fogman
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31 Dec 2011, 12:34 pm

Orwell wrote:
scubasteve wrote:
AstroGeek wrote:
Asp-Z wrote:
Unity is crap, use apt-get to install Gnome then select Gnome Classic at login. On a netbook you should get better performance from that too.

MATE is pretty good too, but is still a work in progress. You have to add some repos to get all of the features, some of which are still experimental.


I'm pretty fed up with both Unity and Gnome 3. Is MATE stable enough for general home use? Any difference running it in Mint vs. Arch?

Here's one advantage of my "outdated" Debian system. I've still got Gnome 2.30 with support for the next couple years until someone else gets around to writing a workable desktop environment. KDE4 is almost usable by now, so it should be good enough when I finally have to leave Squeeze. Or maybe Gnome3 will suck less by then.


Or MATE will actually be stable and usable by the time a new stable version of Debian comes out.

My question though, is what will the big UNIX deveopers go with for a desktop environment? They used CDE since the early-mid 90's, and it was a included as a fallback desktop for Solaris when Solaris switched over to GNOME 2 until only recently. Surely Oracle and any other SysV vendors that use GNOME are going to continue using it over GNOME Shell.


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Asp-Z
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31 Dec 2011, 3:14 pm

Call me old fashioned but I like the version of GNOME used by Debian. It's the most usable interface for Linux - it's not fancy, but it's easy and does the job well.



AstroGeek
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31 Dec 2011, 11:23 pm

Asp-Z wrote:
Call me old fashioned but I like the version of GNOME used by Debian. It's the most usable interface for Linux - it's not fancy, but it's easy and does the job well.

Basically, that's what MATE is. In fact, that's exactly what MATE is. They just forked GNOME 2.



Asp-Z
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01 Jan 2012, 1:15 pm

MATE sounds awesome to me then :P

Here's a joke I saw on YouTube the other day, thought you lot would appreciate: Ubuntu is an ancient African word which literally translates to "I can't configure Debian" :P

Speaking of which, I appear to have screwed up my Debian install by attempting to enable SELinux...



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03 Jan 2012, 6:37 pm

I said Ubuntu since I just really like using it, expecially with gnome-shell :)
But I also enjoying using Cent OS on my friends server we use to run game servers on x)


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gamefreak
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04 Jan 2012, 12:20 am

Debian, I'm finding Ubuntu to be bloated even on modest hardware. However I am finding to love the Linux Mint Debian Flavor with XFCE. I found it to be lean and mean. Even on decade old hardware. Had LMDE on a 1.3GHz Athlon Classic with 512MB of Ram. Until someone bought it off me and wanted Windows on it. Interesting because all he wanted to do is play DVD's and browse the net. Which is what Mint was already doing.



johansen
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04 Jan 2012, 5:23 am

i have been using ubuntu for 2 years because its the only distro that installs on my laptop.

when i wasn't paying for electricity i ran a few servers and Debian was my distro of choice.

that said, if you're a real nerd, then you would be running something like pcbsd.



scubasteve
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12 Jan 2012, 12:36 am

Orwell wrote:
Here's one advantage of my "outdated" Debian system. I've still got Gnome 2.30 with support for the next couple years until someone else gets around to writing a workable desktop environment. KDE4 is almost usable by now, so it should be good enough when I finally have to leave Squeeze. Or maybe Gnome3 will suck less by then.


I get that. And I'd be lying if I said I wasn't tempted to try Debian again, throughout this "Unity"-inspired distro-hopping binge I've been on.

I simply don't agree with their philosophy. (particularly regarding "non-free" modules/drivers and the Mozilla branding.)

I've been trying out Arch for the last couple of weeks, and so far, I'm pretty happy with it. It's insanely fast, great documentation, and I like the rolling release concept.

Though I'll admit, I don't fully agree with "The Arch Way" either. It's like, "simple is doing everything yourself". (Or if you prefer, "freedom is slavery" ;))

In any case, Mate seems perfectly stable and usable at this point. And Cinnamon also seems promising.

Hopefully the success of these projects will convince Gnome and Cannonical to change course - Whether by merging Cinnamon, or taking a whole new direction.



Orwell
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12 Jan 2012, 1:42 am

scubasteve wrote:
I simply don't agree with their philosophy. (particularly regarding "non-free" modules/drivers and the Mozilla branding.)

All of that stuff is available if you want it, though. Non-free drivers and software are available from official Debian repos. Re-branding of Mozilla stuff doesn't matter much to me (it's the same thing with a different icon) but there is a repo for the official Mozilla-branded versions.


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scubasteve
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12 Jan 2012, 3:27 am

Orwell wrote:
scubasteve wrote:
I simply don't agree with their philosophy. (particularly regarding "non-free" modules/drivers and the Mozilla branding.)

All of that stuff is available if you want it, though. Non-free drivers and software are available from official Debian repos. Re-branding of Mozilla stuff doesn't matter much to me (it's the same thing with a different icon) but there is a repo for the official Mozilla-branded versions.


True. And I could easily install Mate in Ubuntu. But the philosophy of a distro matters to me. It affects the overall vibe of the community. It also affects the attitudes of outside (ie. corporate) contributors toward the distro, and toward Linux at large.



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06 Mar 2012, 12:24 am

Fast. Full. Simple.



oldsk00l90
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07 Mar 2012, 4:32 pm

Mine is currently Linux Mint because it automatically recognizes my wireless card on my laptop. If wireless drivers were not an issue, I would use something like Gentoo or Slackware because of their customization possibilities and raw power.



scubasteve
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09 Mar 2012, 1:05 pm

oldsk00l90 wrote:
Mine is currently Linux Mint because it automatically recognizes my wireless card on my laptop. If wireless drivers were not an issue, I would use something like Gentoo or Slackware because of their customization possibilities and raw power.


It varies. Some chipsets will "just work" in Ubuntu/Mint, or can be easily configured with something like Jockey. However, there some Linux-hating chipsets that require messing around with kernel modules and/or firmware, and these can be a nightmare in Mint or Ubuntu. For instance, my laptop has Broadcom wireless built-in, and I also have a Realtek-based USB adapter. Both were much easier to get working in Gentoo than they were in Mint.