asperger kids have a lack of imaginitive play

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iceveela
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16 Jan 2012, 8:17 pm

I don't know, when I was little, and even now, I had a LOT of imaginative play! granted it is usually by myself. My little brother who has autism also has a lot of imaginative play.

is this normal, or are we just the odd ones out?


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MagicMeerkat
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16 Jan 2012, 8:20 pm

I've always found that theory as nothing more than BS.


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16 Jan 2012, 8:22 pm

I remember having a "fantasy land" where all manor of things were real when i was little, and now write fiction for myself... i was often described as being unusually imaginative. I do, however, remember getting really upset when other children broke the rules of my imaginary world. I guess i made them, but once made one i refused to change the basic principles of the world... I wonder if that would be seen as lack of imagination.



btbnnyr
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16 Jan 2012, 8:31 pm

I lacked "imaginative"/pretend/social imitative play as a kid. I played by stacking things, lining things up, and fiddling with things in ways that lacked meaning to others. Lacking the kinds of play common amongst NT children does not mean lacking imagination in general.



aspie48
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16 Jan 2012, 8:33 pm

btbnnyr wrote:
I lacked "imaginative"/pretend/social imitative play as a kid. I played by stacking things, lining things up, and fiddling with things in ways that lacked meaning to others. Lacking the kinds of play common amongst NT children does not mean lacking imagination in general.
true +1



goodwitchy
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16 Jan 2012, 8:33 pm

I had imaginary friends into my teens.... and sometimes I still summon them. :lol:


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16 Jan 2012, 8:33 pm

MagicMeerkat wrote:
I've always found that theory as nothing more than BS.

I have to agree. I lived in a fantasy land highly based off my obsessions. It took me a long time to grow out of it too, even now I like to think about living a different life deeply engaging a personal interest. Day dreaming relaxes me.


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16 Jan 2012, 8:41 pm

When I was little I would spend hours Transforming, then lining up all of my Transformers/Power Rangers/assorted other robots into two opposing factions, and then take them back down again the same way. They never did get around to ever actually having a battle.. that would have meant to many missiles and small pieces to pick up.. not to mention the chance of something maybe getting broken.

I also kept all of them in individual ziplock bags when I wasn't playing with them so that I didn't lose anything.



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16 Jan 2012, 8:44 pm

I found that my imagination was what usually got me into trouble with social situations. I would imagine one way a scenario would play out or how I could explain it, but that would be too far from the truth and would cause the disconnect with other people.

When doing my interests I have always had an imaginary friend or opponent there with whom I could either show off my interests or compete against respectively. When I found a really, really good friend I told him he was like my imaginary friend come to life, and I meant it.

I have been trying over the past year to be based more in the real here and now, and it sometimes feels like a part of me is dying because of it. I'm trying to find the middle ground so that I can be happy in both worlds.



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16 Jan 2012, 8:47 pm

I struggle to imagine any aspie having a lack of anything to do with imagine.


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NicoleG
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16 Jan 2012, 8:47 pm

rabbittss wrote:
not to mention the chance of something maybe getting broken.

I also kept all of them in individual ziplock bags when I wasn't playing with them so that I didn't lose anything.


I would get horribly sad and despondent if I ever lost a piece of one of my jigsaw puzzles or a piece of a board game, or if a playing card from a deck finally took a loss from hundreds of days of me playing with it.



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16 Jan 2012, 8:48 pm

I would think imaginative play of someone on the spectrum would simply mean a more complete set of conditions in the imaginative scope.

So for example if I played cops and robbers I would insist that the cop role cannot cheat or be dishonest in the play but the robber could because bad guys do that but good guys were not expected to (a lesson I learned later was not true)

another example might be playing kitty cats... cats don't eat with their hands so if meal time happens before pretending ends then everyone must eat out of bowls to keep the play within the scope.

I dunno, I usually only had one or maybe two maximum friends at a time to play with and they knew my expectations for imaginative play and as a result were happy to comply with my scope constrictions


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aspie48
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16 Jan 2012, 8:48 pm

one more thing i would like to add. it is unscientific to conclude that any type of play is "unimaginitive". how can you tell if someone is or is not imagining while they play.



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16 Jan 2012, 8:54 pm

I had a good imagination when I was a kid. My NT sister and I would pretend to be superheroes while my dad was the villain. We also would make up animal species and create pretend zoos. One of my favorite things that my sister and I did as children was role playing Harry Potter books with stuffed animals. Harry was a beanie baby cat. Good times. Haha.



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16 Jan 2012, 8:56 pm

NicoleG wrote:
rabbittss wrote:
not to mention the chance of something maybe getting broken.

I also kept all of them in individual ziplock bags when I wasn't playing with them so that I didn't lose anything.


I would get horribly sad and despondent if I ever lost a piece of one of my jigsaw puzzles or a piece of a board game, or if a playing card from a deck finally took a loss from hundreds of days of me playing with it.


Yes. I can certainly identify with this. I hated it when anything got lost or went missing, Even something completely replaceable like a Die. If it wasn't the one the game came with it took a lot of convincing for me to accept it.. But I also don't play a lot of games because I don't understand how to read people and I frequently lost my temper over it.



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16 Jan 2012, 8:59 pm

I have always had a vivid imagination for as long as I can remember. I still to this day have an imaginary world and imaginary friends, and all of it is derived from my special interests.