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CaptainTrips222
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07 Feb 2012, 11:47 pm

I kinda of like Baroque era music better than Classical. You?



Bun
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07 Feb 2012, 11:51 pm

Send links to explain the difference to us philistines? :P


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auntblabby
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08 Feb 2012, 3:46 am

as has been said, "if it ain't baroque, don't fix it." ;)



Bun
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08 Feb 2012, 3:47 am

auntblabby wrote:
as has been said, "if it ain't baroque, don't fix it." ;)

:lol:


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auntblabby
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08 Feb 2012, 4:03 am

(clicky) differences between baroque and classical music
in general, baroque is an earlier form, and tends towards strings, while classical tends to incorporate winds and percussion. with a few exceptions, each musical form has something distinct to say. each musical form says what words cannot, picks up where words leave off [to borrow a bit from marin marais].



Bun
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08 Feb 2012, 4:05 am

Alright. I'll check on YouTube, and answer later.


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auntblabby
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08 Feb 2012, 4:13 am

i generally like the later forms better, they are "fancier" [more complex, with more varied and richer aural and textural flavors, more exotic rhythms]. but it is very interesting to me, to listen to people mixing and matching the forms, such as the baroque beatles or the muzak grunge. i wish sony [sonic foundary] would release a form of ACID which allows such re-composition of music for us non-musical [IOW no instrumental talents] types.



Bun
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08 Feb 2012, 4:31 am

I'm undecided, as of yet.


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RarePegs
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08 Feb 2012, 4:36 am

I generally prefer Baroque with its higher level of contrapuntal movement to Classical with its higher level of Alberti bass. I've even said to people that I wish the young Mozart had followed CPE Bach rather than JC Bach (because CPE was closer to his father's style!). A lot of my favourite moments in Mozart are when he harks backwards to baroque counterpoint eg in the Kyrie Eleison of his Requiem.

As for Baroque being mainly strings - not true. String sections of orchestras have traditionally been bigger than wind and percussion sections over different historical periods but there was plenty of wind instrument writing, (both solo and orchestral) in the Baroque period, notably in some of JS Bach's Brandenburg Concertos. As for percussion, kettledrums were common. What's more significant between periods is that transverse flutes (which co-existed with recorders in the Baroque) usurped recorders in the Classical period and clarinets appeared in the Classical period orchestra.



auntblabby
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08 Feb 2012, 5:26 am

RarePegs wrote:
As for percussion, kettledrums were common.

are there any examples of baroque music using snare drums, cymbals and bass drums?



RarePegs
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08 Feb 2012, 7:57 am

auntblabby wrote:
RarePegs wrote:
As for percussion, kettledrums were common.

are there any examples of baroque music using snare drums, cymbals and bass drums?


I don't think so. Even in the Classical period, I think those were associated mainly with the fad for "Turkish marches".



Mummy_of_Peanut
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08 Feb 2012, 9:17 am

I love baroque - it's my favourite style of old music. To me, it feels like it has a distinctive beat, which I can't always sense in other old music. Am I right?


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TheOddGoat
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08 Feb 2012, 9:59 am

Romantic period, REPRESENT!



hadrian_f
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08 Feb 2012, 11:06 am

I do so oblige, I've always preferred the Romantic era.



emtyeye
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08 Feb 2012, 11:12 am

auntblabby wrote:
as has been said, "if it ain't baroque, don't fix it." ;)


auntblabby, you so funny!

I love both. Baroque is more structured and kind of geometrical in my ears, and I am very fond of much Baroque music -especially CPE Bach cello pieces. Also JS Bach almost any. I prefer pieces written in the minor mode over major almost always, no matter which period they are from. Classical gets more free flowing and then the Romantic period were the poets, speaking emotional feelings through sound. Chopin, Chopin, Chopin. My all time favorite.