Post a random quote from a book you're reading

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Fnord
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15 Oct 2019, 12:01 pm

Stikky was not an excellent spacer.  He had been up and down the rank ladder several times: promoted because time had passed; demoted because he overslept or failed an inspection.  He was, however, an excellent computer tech.  He intuitively understood the workings of the Navy's information systems better than any of the officers, indeed, better than anyone on the ship.  It was Stikky to whom the other ratings turned when connections failed, or new installations balked, or old devices slowed.  More than once, another rating got the credit and a promotion based on something Stikky did.

Yet in all of this, Stikky was content.  He enjoyed what he did; he had a continuing parade of devices to puzzle through, install, and confirm as operational.  As section officers cycled in, each tried to rehabilitate Stikky as a spacer, soon found that the network suffered, and so learned to leave Stikky alone.

Stikky was the butt of good-natured derision, which he ignored, or didn't notice.  It was always good-natured because the network suffered if it wasn't.  Today's ribbing was somehow different.

"Stikky!  The Captain wants to see you!"

"You're in trouble now!  Did you let his link crash?"

Stikky was immune to their comments and ignored them, until the Lieutenant touched his shoulder firmly, and said, "Stand up.  Let's see you.  Your tunic has a spot; let's get it changed.  The Captain wants you on the bridge."

It took longer than he expected and the Lieutenant was starting to get nervous.


-- Agent of the Imperium, Copyright © 2015 by Marc Miller


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BenderRodriguez
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15 Oct 2019, 5:25 pm

IsabellaLinton wrote:
Graham's Magazine, July 1848 in review of Wuthering Heights:

How a human being could have attempted such a book as the present without committing suicide before he had finished a dozen chapters, is a mystery. It is a compound of vulgar depravity and unnatural horrors, such as we might suppose a person, inspired by a mixture of brandy and gunpowder, might write for the edification of fifth-rate blackguards.


:skull: Be still, my heart ... :skull:


Whatever the intentions, this is still a great homage and in a way spot on (it's difficult to image somebody having that kind of mental fortitude)!

IsabellaLinton wrote:
They are abstract and bodiless. Their love is feline; it is tigerish … Their actions and sayings are like those of monomaniacs, or persons who have breathed nitrous oxide. One looks back at the story as to a world of brilliant figures in an atmosphere of mist; shapes that burn their colours into the brain, and depart into enveloping fog. This novel is the unformed writing of a giant’s hand; the large utterance of a baby god.

Allott, Miriam (ed). The Brontës: The Critical Heritage. London: Routledge, 1974.



And this is also spot on and wonderful, thank you for posting :)


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IsabellaLinton
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18 Oct 2019, 8:56 am

Excerpts from a review of Wuthering Heights, by Virginia Woolf (1916)

-Wuthering Heights is a more difficult book to understand than Jane Eyre, because Emily was a greater poet than Charlotte. When Charlotte wrote she said with eloquence and splendour and passion 'I love', 'I hate', 'I suffer'. Her experience, though more intense, is on a level with our own. But there is no 'I' in Wuthering Heights. There are no governesses and no employers. Emily was inspired by a more general conception. She looked out upon a world cleft in gigantic disorder and felt within her the power to unite it through the mouths of her characters - not merely 'I love' or 'I hate', but 'we, the whole human race...', and 'you, the eternal powers ...'; these sentences remain unfinished.

-It is this suggestion of power underlying the apparitions of human nature and lifting them up into the presence of greatness that gives the book its huge stature among other novels.

-It is as if she could tear up all that we know human beings by, and fill these unrecognisable transparencies with such a gust of life that they transcend reality. Hers, then, is the rarest of all powers. She could free life from its dependence on facts; with a few touches indicate the spirit of a face so that it needs no body; by speaking of the moor make its wind blow and the thunder roar.

:skull:



Kraichgauer
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19 Oct 2019, 7:18 pm

"We ran out of beer, and I had to sh*t."

Charles Bukowski - Tales Of Ordinary Madness.


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06 Nov 2019, 9:28 am

"Every locked door has a key. Every problem has a solution."