Is it worth getting tested when you're an adult?

Page 1 of 1 [ 9 posts ] 

jamiedfw
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

User avatar

Joined: 14 Mar 2012
Age: 50
Gender: Male
Posts: 3

23 Mar 2012, 6:19 am

This is probably a dumb question, but is there benefit to getting tested as a mature adult who's through education?

I ask because growing up I know I was seen as the "weird but nice" student in class (at various stages I've been diagnosed with dyslexia, dyspraxia, ADD, and very low self-esteem), my folks always tell me I have low social skills and that I've never needed to have friends (in the assumption I'd do something about it I think), but when I became more consciously aware of it, I just assumed that I was the weird kid in my class and I'd just have to try harder to be more normal. Given all that, I could see a benefit of being tested as a child.

Anyhow, I went to university, got my High School Teachers' Qualification (Chemistry) before eventually getting an MBA and a Ph.D. (still being viewed as awkward I've been told), and returning back to teaching, where I'm now Head of Science.

At the start of last year we got an Educational Psychologist working at our school. She's Head of Learning Support (i.e. she gets the kids tested for things like dyslexia, speech therapy ADHD etc.) and her office is opposite my classroom, so she'd regularly drop by to have a chat. Out of the blue last week she asked if I'd ever thought of getting my Asperger Syndrome tested.

After responding that I didn't have it, that I couldn't be a teacher with it, that the kids I teach wouldn't put up with it in a public high school if I was too weird, and that ok I have eccentricities, but they're just eccentricities etc., I got to thinking about it. So, I ask again, is there benefit to getting tested as a mature adult who's through education?

p.s. I didn't mean to insult anybody with anything I said above. If I did, sorry.



glider18
Supporting Member
Supporting Member

User avatar

Joined: 8 Nov 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 8,056
Location: USA

23 Mar 2012, 6:32 am

I am also in the education field. I have taught English in both high school and at a local university. I now serve as our school's gifted intervention specialist and Title I reading teacher. It wasn't until 2008 that I learned of Asperger's---well into my teaching career. After seeing that the criteria matched me, I scheduled an appointment for a diagnosis---which I was given for Asperger's.

Benefits? For me it was for a "finding myself" thing. After learning I had Asperger's, I went on a journey of self-discovery where I learned how Asperger's works in my life. I needed to know if I had it or not. And then when I found out I did, I learned about this "difference" and my family was better able to understand me---like why I don't like to go to parties, etc. It also helped my family and I better understand my special intense interests and adherence to routines.

Basically---I just had to know from a professional whether or not I had Asperger's.


_________________
"My journey has just begun."


PerfectlyDarkTails
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 13 Mar 2012
Gender: Male
Posts: 838
Location: Wales

23 Mar 2012, 6:45 am

Im wondering the same thing. Personally I wanted to get tested as a sence of closeure, a sence of who I am so to speak. I am highly educated and been advised that it is not too important, considering my high intelect. But advised to get it checked out if it causes significant social difficulties - since I have suspected Medium/High Autism Spectrum Disorder.


_________________
"When you begin to realize your own existence and break out of the social norm, then others know you have completely lost your mind." -PerfectlyDarkTails

AS 168/200, NT: 20/ 200, AQ=45 EQ=15, SQ=78, IQ=135


cathylynn
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 24 Aug 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 12,465
Location: northeast US

23 Mar 2012, 10:49 am

not for me. i know i have it and that's enough for me. making it official seems a waste.



NTAndrew
Toucan
Toucan

User avatar

Joined: 18 Jan 2012
Age: 59
Gender: Male
Posts: 280

23 Mar 2012, 11:39 am

I wonder that too. So much of what I hear in this forum is so familiar, yet when I have taken the on-line tests I always come out Neurotypical. I wonder, considering that I am 51 now and have had a lifetime of social adaptation, if it is even possible to identify if I have Aspergers or not anymore?

I suppose it would give me a sense of closure, a sense of identity. I look at myself now and I just see me as flawed and kind of weird. All of the labels that have been attached to me (Dyslexic, ADD, Clinically Depressed, Social Anxiety Disorder) have sort of described parts of me, but I don't see them as really saying who I am, just describing what's wrong with me.

The other thing is that it seems diagnosis is so subjective. It's not like they can identify it with a brain scan or a blood test. A person looks at a list of symptoms and written tests and decides if it all adds up to a diagnosis. The idea that someone who interviews me and looks over my answers to a test would somehow have better insights into who I am than I do seems pretty silly.



Ravenclawgurl
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Jun 2007
Age: 30
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,334
Location: somewhere over the rainbow

23 Mar 2012, 11:43 am

if you need services yes. because without a proper diagnoses you cant get services (though with the recent budget cuts in many agencies due to the failing economy you still cant get services even with a proper diagnosis :?



Tuttle
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Mar 2006
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,172
Location: Massachusetts

23 Mar 2012, 1:06 pm

I was diagnosed at age 22, after graduating college.

For me, its been huge. The diagnosis means I'm seeing a specialist therapist who's helping me with a lot. I'm going to finally get OT to help with sensory issues at some point. I'll get accommodations in any work environment. Other people treat me better. I understand myself better.

You have a job so some of what I get that I didn't mentioned aren't relevant, but it comes down to what you need. Having Asperger's means you're impaired. Where are those impairments? What effects do they have on your life? What can help with them?



Wolfheart
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2011
Age: 30
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,971
Location: Kent, England

23 Mar 2012, 1:18 pm

I think it can give you a sense of closure and relief, it will help you identity certain problems and give an understanding of how you are to those around you or your loved ones, it's definitely worth getting a professional diagnosis.



Ecl713
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Mar 2012
Age: 33
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,418
Location: Salem, Oregon

23 Mar 2012, 1:53 pm

Wolfheart wrote:
I think it can give you a sense of closure and relief, it will help you identity certain problems and give an understanding of how you are to those around you or your loved ones, it's definitely worth getting a professional diagnosis.


Agreed.
All I'm going to be looking for is validation, closure, and that sense relief. That's worth it to me.