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JoeRose
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05 Apr 2012, 9:21 am

Just had an assessment with the aspergers team and I've met criteria for further evaluation. They want to interview my parents and find out details about my childhood. This is something I'm really uneasy about as my parents don't even know I've had an assessment or anything like that. So I've got to tell them in the next few weeks and I'm really worried about it. I just don't want my parents to worry about me or even know that I may have aspergers. I find when people know that you've got something they start trying to read in between the lines and stuff and I don't like it. Is it normal practice for aspergers assessment teams to interview the parents when someone is getting assessed? I think I would benefit from the diagnosis but I'm starting to wonder as to whether that benefit outweighs the fact that my parents would know I have the condition.
I'm in a bit of a fragile state about all this. I'm really scared about what's next. What if I do have aspergers. I don't want to sound disrespectful to anyone with it but I just wish I could be normal and just get on with life like everybody else. It scares me that I may not ever be able to have lasting and fulfilling relationships with people. I really don't know how to feel right now...



questor
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05 Apr 2012, 10:18 am

I think they want to talk to your parents to ask them about your childhood. To see what sort of spectrum traits you exhibited then.

In my case, I am satisfied with a self diagnosis. There is nothing the gov can do for me in regards to my condition at my age--early 50s. I am not in school, so I am not entitled to programs for those in school. My other health problems put me out of work, so I am not entitled to employment programs, and I get disability payments from the gov for my other health problems, so I don't need other gov help for people on the spectrum.

If you are planning on applying for help from the gov based on your spectrum disorder, then you will need to get an official diagnosis, but if not, then it is a matter of choice.


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JoeRose
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05 Apr 2012, 6:13 pm

they seem to think that the government help would really aid me because I'm currently at uni. I mean if I'm entitled to support then I think I deserve it. But I think the benefit of actually knowing what's been a little amiss with me all these years would really help me. I suppose then I could start to meet more people who are similar to me, become more active on these forums and actually realise why I'm quite a bit less normal than everyone else. I think it's something I really need to find out... but I just wish my parents didn't have to be involved! :(



fleurdelily
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05 Apr 2012, 6:22 pm

... just a thought.... if the criteria is "someone who remembers you from childhood" and remembers how you were, how you developed/reacted/behaved etc, then perhapse there is somone else they could ask? a grand parent, a cool aunt, or babysitter, nanny.... first grade teacher, pastor, somebody other than parents?

I would like to get a diagnosis for vindication, mostly, but I hesitate because I haven't spoken to those people who adopted me in almost 30 years, and I feel it's none of their business. So, that's kinda the same as you, but kinda different.... that's why I've wondered if anyone with the requisite memories will suffice


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