Do words have different meanings for Americans than....

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andy1976uk
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23 Jan 2007, 3:28 pm

MrMark wrote:
Allow me to reiterate that if anyone brings specific posts to my attention which they feel violate WP rules, I will review the posts and respond in a uniform manner. In addition to watching numerous threads on this forum, I have a full-time job, household chores, and a couple of hobbies to pursue. I do not have 24 consecutive hours to devote to a single issue.
I'm sorry that you've had such a negative experience with this site. I hope that it does not overshadow other, positive experiences that you have had. Ascan's posts may be controversial, but controversial does not violate the rules. If it did, Alex or I would have locked the thread about the AS student who allegedly stabbed an alleged bully. We both find some of the opinions expressed quite distateful, but there has been no violation of the rules. We don't (or at least I don't) feel that we can censor simply because we don't like what is posted. There must be a clear rule violation.

I am going to attempt to split this portion of this thread off and move it to theWP Site Discussions Forum as I feel it is a vital discussion but inappropriate to this thread. I've never done this before so please bear with me.



Gawd, you're so dumb. If you, ascan, atomika, roman, logitechdog and a whole host of others are typical examples of what it means to be "aspie" then there is no way you can be considered "above average", somekind of new "master race" or "evolutionary successors to homo-sapiens" (as is so frequently articulated by the locals) or can you be the same as me. It's now obvious to me that my doctor made a horrible mistake and misdiagnosed me.

ascan didn't just make "controversial comments" he made a personal attack on me, which supposedly violates the rules (I made a point to read them very carefully this afternoon).
I also guess you consider his comment in a thread where he states, for all intents and purposes, that people from Africa shouldn't be allowed to emigrate to the UK because they're effectively mentally retarded acceptable then? Most would view that as racist.



amerikasend
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23 Jan 2007, 5:12 pm

No one has mentioned Ebonics, that's a language on it's own. I have tried to talk to people that use ebonics and I get really confused.



Melantha
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23 Jan 2007, 6:43 pm

Sophist wrote:
[size=15]We don't use "sarni" for sandwich. We still call it sandwich.

Where on earth is "sarni" used for sandwich? I grew up with British books and TV shows and never came across the word "sarni". Do you mean "sammie"? In New Zealand and Australia we use "sammie" as short for sandwich; I'm not sure about England.

Sophist wrote:
[size=15]"Cow" is not a bad word here. Unless you're saying someone is fat as a cow, and then it's just mean.

"Cow" isn't a bad word anywhere, except in the sense you noted.



Melantha
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23 Jan 2007, 6:47 pm

Ok, never mind about the "sarni" thing. I just Googled it and it is in fact British slang for sandwich. Weird, I have never heard of it before!! !



Melantha
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23 Jan 2007, 6:52 pm

SteveK wrote:
scrulie wrote:
SteveK wrote:
Yeah "american" is just another dialect of english. It is probably closer to british than australian is.

You reckon? That's interesting! I'm not disagreeing with you at all Steve I just always assumed Australian was closer to 'british' english! That may have more to do with the accent, I don't know! :)


The basic Australian dialect IS closer to the UK than American is(from what I know), but the new words an changed words and their common usage may be more pronounced in australian. Maybe it is the odd animals, the desire to start a new country, the relative isolation from the UK, or whetever, WHO KNOWS? But that is how I see it.

Steve


The closest to British English is New Zealand English. Australian English is rapidly becoming Americanized, much more so than New Zealand English.



Melantha
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23 Jan 2007, 7:00 pm

ping-machine wrote:
Stubbies = Extremely tight shorts.

I'm from New Zealand and "stubbies" always referred to the short-necked beer-bottles, not tight shorts. Maybe that's a new development?



Tim_Tex
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23 Jan 2007, 7:07 pm

Also, different parts of the U.S. use different terms for things. And what about Canada, Australia, New Zealand, or South Africa?

Here is a sample of the terminology in the Southern U.S.:

"Coke" is used for any soft drink, regardless of brand. My theory is that is a issue of regional prode, since Coca-Cola is headquartered in Atlanta. Called "soda" or "pop" in other areas.

"Kudzu" is a type of weed.

"Contraflow lane": when a hurricane is approaching, both sides of a freeway are opened so that motorists can easily head away from the hurricane's path. However, during Hurricane Rita in 2005, even this was not enough to accommodate nearly one million people fleeing the Houston area.

(NOTE: Although hurricanes can strike as far north as the Canadian Maritimes, and even Spain--they are mainly a Southern U.S. issue, and they rarely strike anywhere north of Norfolk, Virginia).

"Goo-Goo": This is a large chunk of marshmallow, mixed with nuts, and dipped in chocolate, that is popular in the South.

This is about all I can think of right now.

Tim


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9CatMom
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23 Jan 2007, 9:37 pm

I have heard that "stuffed" means pregnant in England, while in America, it means you are full.

I have also heard that in Australia, there are about 100 different terms for "vomit."



9CatMom
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23 Jan 2007, 9:48 pm

"Knackered" means "exhausted" or "tired" in England.

One of my favorite expressions is "enough to make a cat laugh."



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23 Jan 2007, 9:57 pm

neutral ground is another term for median in the US or at least we use it in new orleans


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24 Jan 2007, 8:50 am

andy1976uk wrote:
I also guess you consider his comment in a thread where he states, for all intents and purposes, that people from Africa shouldn't be allowed to emigrate to the UK because they're effectively mentally retarded acceptable then? Most would view that as racist.

Racist certainly, but hes free to say it since it wasnt an attack against anyone in particular. That doesnt mean it doesnt make the rest of us very angry :evil:

That should be in the topic Mark split off though.

Quote:
Where on earth is "sarni" used for sandwich?

Im not sure where the word comes from originally, but I do know someone who calls em "sarnies"

Quote:
Ok, never mind about the "sarni" thing. I just Googled it and it is in fact British slang for sandwich.

...heh thats wierd lol Im British and I only know 1 person who uses it.

Quote:
I have heard that "stuffed" means pregnant in England, while in America, it means you are full.

Nope, it means full in England too, or at least in Manchester anyway


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andy1976uk
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24 Jan 2007, 8:57 am

Quote:
Ok, never mind about the "sarni" thing. I just Googled it and it is in fact British slang for sandwich.


I've heard many people use it in Liverpool over the years. It's a very working class expression.



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24 Jan 2007, 9:05 am

Ah ok, Im fairly sure shes a scouser so that makes sense lol


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peebo
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24 Jan 2007, 9:18 am

Melantha wrote:
Ok, never mind about the "sarni" thing. I just Googled it and it is in fact British slang for sandwich. Weird, I have never heard of it before!! !


oddly enough in scotland here a sandwich is referred to as a "piece".


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ascan
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24 Jan 2007, 11:40 am

Assassin wrote:
Racist certainly

So, what's the British definition of racism, then? And can someone provide the US version? Has political correctness changed that definition?



SteveK
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24 Jan 2007, 12:52 pm

amerikasend wrote:
No one has mentioned Ebonics, that's a language on it's own. I have tried to talk to people that use ebonics and I get really confused.


"Ebonics" is just a pidgeon english with cultural slang and abreviations mixed in. EVENTUALLY, the US came to its senses and recognized it as such!

I bet all those people that couldn't even speak ONE language got a kick out of all of the sudden being declared bilingual!

Steve