Page 1 of 2 [ 26 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

Katatonia
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 10 Apr 2012
Age: 22
Gender: Male
Posts: 50

03 Jun 2012, 1:44 pm

Lately I've been having some dramatic mood swings, I get sudden feelings of euphoria then I can become extremely mad. Just a moment ago I became extremely mad at a comment someone posted on YouTube and as I was walking out, I got very amused and laughed followed by being very happy and followed by extreme anger again. Is this related to autism or?



redrobin62
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Apr 2012
Age: 57
Gender: Male
Posts: 13,662
Location: Seattle, WA

03 Jun 2012, 1:48 pm

LookTwice
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 30 Oct 2011
Age: 107
Gender: Male
Posts: 480
Location: Lost, somewhere

03 Jun 2012, 1:58 pm

Occam's razor points to this:

Age: 15



Katatonia
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 10 Apr 2012
Age: 22
Gender: Male
Posts: 50

03 Jun 2012, 2:39 pm

Since when is being 15 relevant to it? This isn't because of my age, I've had mood swings before but not like the ones I've had lately. These happen basically every second nowadays, I can go from laughing at a joke you said to getting very, very aggressive at what you second within a second.



LookTwice
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 30 Oct 2011
Age: 107
Gender: Male
Posts: 480
Location: Lost, somewhere

03 Jun 2012, 2:58 pm

Katatonia wrote:
Since when is being 15 relevant to it? This isn't because of my age, I've had mood swings before but not like the ones I've had lately. These happen basically every second nowadays, I can go from laughing at a joke you said to getting very, very aggressive at what you second within a second.


Mood swings are a normal part of life.
Hormonal upheaval due to puberty exacerbates it.

There may be more to it, but how should we know?



glasstoria
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 2 Jul 2011
Age: 39
Gender: Female
Posts: 469
Location: Missouri USA

03 Jun 2012, 10:04 pm

Moods are not tattooed onto a person. As my therapist says "You can get happy in the same pants you got mad in", which I think means that emotions can be short lived, so don't make any permanent decisions based on something that may come and go relatively quickly (ie- faster than you change your pants).

I would not be concerned unless the high and low is causing you difficulty. If you are simply aware of it, and see it for what it is, and let it go, and go about your business there is nothing wrong with that. It is being human.


_________________
Your Aspie score: 165 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 48 of 200
EQ 12 SQ 70 = Extreme Systemizer


winterishere
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

User avatar

Joined: 14 Apr 2011
Age: 24
Gender: Female
Posts: 33
Location: I'll tell you when I get there

03 Jun 2012, 10:17 pm

Haha yeah! AS is very much related to mood swings!! ! I have a lot of trouble with coping with emotions.
In general, aspies can't understand or deal with emotions due to disproportionate sensory, emotional and intellectual processing abilities.

It is, however, fully possible to learn to deal with mood swings. There are so many things you can try. Stuff you might want to try when you get 'big' emotions include:
- turn light switches on and off very fast (this actually helps a lot)
- curl into a ball and rock (find your best position, it will calm you)
- bang against walls, scream, punch stuff (not so great if you hurt yourself, and not so productive, but still...)
- breathe. think about air coming in and leaving your body.
- imagine your emotions as moving like an ocean - in linear waves away from where you can physically feel anger inside you
- be very aware of what is around you - ground yourself. think about where your feet are, what you can hear, the air around you... (and breathe again)
- count 1-2-3-4-5 repetitively (not slow, (also not too fast) and not expecting yourself to calm down at any second, just to empty yourself of whatever you're feeling, concentrate on the count)
- spin
- flap your arms like a bird (it sound weird but it helps)
- hum one note for as long as you can, loud or soft. concentrate fully on the hum.
- keep a diary of your mood

I also see a cousellor. You may want to see one at school or whatever. Is that possible for you?

Good luck :)


_________________
Believe in Sherlock


lostgirl1986
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 28 Feb 2012
Age: 33
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,425
Location: Ontario, Canada

03 Jun 2012, 11:31 pm

I get really bad mood swings. Sometimes if I get really mad, I have to shut myself down in my bedroom for awhile, lay on my bed and just cool down to get the anger out.



vanhalenkurtz
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 May 2012
Gender: Male
Posts: 837

04 Jun 2012, 2:37 am

winterishere wrote:
- turn light switches on and off very fast (this actually helps a lot)
- curl into a ball and rock (find your best position, it will calm you)
- bang against walls, scream, punch stuff (not so great if you hurt yourself, and not so productive, but still...)
- breathe. think about air coming in and leaving your body.
- imagine your emotions as moving like an ocean - in linear waves away from where you can physically feel anger inside you
- be very aware of what is around you - ground yourself. think about where your feet are, what you can hear, the air around you... (and breathe again)
- count 1-2-3-4-5 repetitively (not slow, (also not too fast) and not expecting yourself to calm down at any second, just to empty yourself of whatever you're feeling, concentrate on the count)
- spin
- flap your arms like a bird (it sound weird but it helps)
- hum one note for as long as you can, loud or soft. concentrate fully on the hum.
- keep a diary of your mood


Very useful suggestions above.


_________________
ASQ: 45. RAADS-R: 229.
BAP: 132 aloof, 132 rigid, 104 pragmatic.
Aspie score: 173 / 200; NT score: 33 / 200.
EQ: 6.


Katatonia
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 10 Apr 2012
Age: 22
Gender: Male
Posts: 50

04 Jun 2012, 3:20 am

winterishere wrote:
Haha yeah! AS is very much related to mood swings!! ! I have a lot of trouble with coping with emotions.
In general, aspies can't understand or deal with emotions due to disproportionate sensory, emotional and intellectual processing abilities.

It is, however, fully possible to learn to deal with mood swings. There are so many things you can try. Stuff you might want to try when you get 'big' emotions include:
- turn light switches on and off very fast (this actually helps a lot)
- curl into a ball and rock (find your best position, it will calm you)
- bang against walls, scream, punch stuff (not so great if you hurt yourself, and not so productive, but still...)

- breathe. think about air coming in and leaving your body.
- imagine your emotions as moving like an ocean - in linear waves away from where you can physically feel anger inside you
- be very aware of what is around you - ground yourself. think about where your feet are, what you can hear, the air around you... (and breathe again)
- count 1-2-3-4-5 repetitively (not slow, (also not too fast) and not expecting yourself to calm down at any second, just to empty yourself of whatever you're feeling, concentrate on the count)
- spin
- flap your arms like a bird (it sound weird but it helps)
- hum one note for as long as you can, loud or soft. concentrate fully on the hum.

- keep a diary of your mood

I also see a cousellor. You may want to see one at school or whatever. Is that possible for you?

Good luck :)


Wait what? Why the hell would I do that stuff? Are you serious?



OJani
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 23 Feb 2011
Age: 45
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,524
Location: Hungary

04 Jun 2012, 9:03 am

Katatonia wrote:
Wait what? Why the hell would I do that stuff? Are you serious?

They are stims or ways to getting rid of the stress. They're supposed to relax you. But, if you find them weird, just go with the less weird stuff.



Katatonia
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 10 Apr 2012
Age: 22
Gender: Male
Posts: 50

05 Jun 2012, 8:55 am

Err, I don't know what you mean by stims. But doing those things won't relax me, don't know where you got that idea from. The last time I ran into a wall and hurt my head, I most certainly never got "relaxed" by it.



Eternity29
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

User avatar

Joined: 28 Mar 2011
Age: 32
Gender: Female
Posts: 145
Location: Iowa

05 Jun 2012, 9:12 am

I think they're just trying to suggest some ways for you to get focused on something else when you're having emotions that you have trouble dealing with. I like to watch something, like on Youtube or TV that will make me laugh when I'm really upset and frustrated.

I had a lot of crazy mood swings when I was a teenager. I was all over the place with my moods and they were intense. I finally grew out of it somewhat when I was about 20. Seriously, part of it really is just being a teenager. You've got hormones raging, and your brain is still developing.



Katatonia
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 10 Apr 2012
Age: 22
Gender: Male
Posts: 50

05 Jun 2012, 9:43 am

Wow, I can't tell if you're all trolling me or not. What makes you think switching a light on and off, then bashing my head in the wall and finally flapping my hands like a bird would help? Are those even suggestions? Honestly...



drgoodietwoshoes
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

User avatar

Joined: 16 May 2012
Age: 39
Gender: Female
Posts: 49

05 Jun 2012, 10:08 am

No, they aren't trolling you. "Stims" is short for self-stimulation, this is a way for people on the spectrum to relax because they focus on the activity. . .I didn't even know i stimmed at first, but I have a lot of repetitive movements that are a way that I release tension. For example:
I bite the insides of my check
I crack my knuckles
i bounce my knee
i do this weird hand thing that involves me tapping my fingers of each hand together.
i let my eyes go out of focus and stare through things
and many other random little, hopefully unnoticeable, things.
People higher on the spectrum tend to rock themselves, they wave their hands in the air, etc. I'm pretty sure when I was a kid I did that stuff, but my family made fun of me so I was able to suppress the more obvious stims.
The humming one is actually a good idea just because if you focus on that one thing you can start to release the negative energy. . .but OJani is right. . .if you think they are weird and are uncomfortable doing them then don't do them. . .but now that i know that i do actually stim, i feel better when I do it. Now i have little hand puzzles that I can manipulate when I feel my emotions are out of control and focus on which dramatically my control over my emotions
At any rate, the suggestion of your age playing a role in it isn't meant to be offensive either. Unfortunately the teenage years are an emotional rollercoaster. Having AS only makes the mood swings 100x worse. . .I remember those days and that was before you were even born. :) Hang in there, it will get better


_________________
Aspie score: 137of 200
Neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 68of 200
Very likely an Aspie
EQ=16/SQ=94 Extremely Systemizing
AQ=38 (2012) 40 (2013)