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TM
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28 Jun 2012, 1:38 pm

1000Knives wrote:
hyperlexian wrote:
Delphiki wrote:
hyperlexian wrote:
kx250rider wrote:
Honestly, if I see a picture of abs that ARE even, I immediately think it's a fake. The human body is formed initially in the womb as two halves, which join together, and therefore we all have a mismatch of features of the body which repeat on left and right sides. That includes ears, eyes, teeth, arms, legs, and ab muscles. As with anything natural, some people have a closer match than others from side to side, but none is perfectly balanced if actually measured out.

Charles

^^^this.

Delphiki, if your asymmetry is severe, you might want to get checked for scoliosis or whether one leg is longer than the other, etc.
At my highschool in 9th grade everyone got a (quick) check for scoliosis. I didn't have it according to that. I have gone to a chiropractor before (not that I needed to) and I one time she compared my legs and one was slightly longer. So she popped something and they were the same length.

Hijacking the thread- Besides the terrible comment about skinny guys and tits on fat girl I am fine with it.

ok good (except the weird comment). funny that a person would consider a natural physique such as thin with abs to "not count". i mean, not count for... what?


Not count for the vanity of bodybuilding/physique comparison. (Not that weightlifting/powerlifting isn't a vanity, just one is a vanity of "look at me, I look really good" and the other is a vanity of "look at me, I'm really strong." And then of course bodybuilding, the purpose is to look strong, but being strong isn't one of the requirements.

But as you can see, they're two pretty different disciplines nowadays, bodybuilding and weightlifting. I mean weightlifters to a point care about physique, but once you get to the unlimited levels, physique is thrown out the door, and they'll just get more mass, muscle and fat, to lift heavier weights up. Bodybuilding on the other hand, again, just about physique, not about strength. They used to be sort of one in the same, Olympic weightlifting events used to have physique contests included in them, and some people would walk from the weightlifting platform to the physique show, but gradually as ideology in the two sports got different (for sake of argument, let's say bodybuilding is a sport, and not a pageant,) that stopped. But in the "old days" physique and strength weren't considered this mutually exclusive thing they are sort of now.


Bodybuilding and strength are kind of connected though, Ronnie pulled something like 800x3 5 weeks out from Mr Olympia. Powerlifting is one of those "f**k it, I can lift a buick" and bodybuilding is one of those "well, to look like I can lift a buick, I kind of need to be able to lift a buick.



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28 Jun 2012, 4:19 pm

Well, apparently 800something for a double with straps. So not really legal, but hey, 800 is still impressive. But, by PL standards, he'd be competing in superheavyweight at his bodyweight. Also by PL standards, 800 is more or less the record for 180-195 weight classes, and that's without straps (but possibly suited, which suited powerlifting seems ridiculous to me.) So he's not that competitive by PL standards, but hey, he's strong, he gets credit for that. But Dimitry Klokov, an Olympic lifter, there's a video of him around doing 800 for 3 or something, at about 200lb bodyweight.

One thing bodybuilders do usually have to their advantage is muscular endurance, powerlifters only train for one rep maxes, so they don't train to lift heavy continuously. In general, bigger muscles can carry more glucose/creatine, so there is an advantage to being bigger in that regard.



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28 Jun 2012, 5:03 pm

1000Knives wrote:
Well, apparently 800something for a double with straps. So not really legal, but hey, 800 is still impressive. But, by PL standards, he'd be competing in superheavyweight at his bodyweight. Also by PL standards, 800 is more or less the record for 180-195 weight classes, and that's without straps (but possibly suited, which suited powerlifting seems ridiculous to me.) So he's not that competitive by PL standards, but hey, he's strong, he gets credit for that. But Dimitry Klokov, an Olympic lifter, there's a video of him around doing 800 for 3 or something, at about 200lb bodyweight.

One thing bodybuilders do usually have to their advantage is muscular endurance, powerlifters only train for one rep maxes, so they don't train to lift heavy continuously. In general, bigger muscles can carry more glucose/creatine, so there is an advantage to being bigger in that regard.


Obviously he's unable to match powerlifters, I was just pointing out that bodybuilders can lift quite substantial amounts of weight. The world record for a raw deadlift is 1015 lbs (just with a belt, without a suit) so 800 lbs for 2 by a bodybuilder while cutting for the Olympia isn't bad.

I agree with you on suits though, straps and the belt I understand but the suit just seems like it adds weight without the lifter being hte source of it.



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28 Jun 2012, 5:59 pm

TM wrote:
1000Knives wrote:
Well, apparently 800something for a double with straps. So not really legal, but hey, 800 is still impressive. But, by PL standards, he'd be competing in superheavyweight at his bodyweight. Also by PL standards, 800 is more or less the record for 180-195 weight classes, and that's without straps (but possibly suited, which suited powerlifting seems ridiculous to me.) So he's not that competitive by PL standards, but hey, he's strong, he gets credit for that. But Dimitry Klokov, an Olympic lifter, there's a video of him around doing 800 for 3 or something, at about 200lb bodyweight.

One thing bodybuilders do usually have to their advantage is muscular endurance, powerlifters only train for one rep maxes, so they don't train to lift heavy continuously. In general, bigger muscles can carry more glucose/creatine, so there is an advantage to being bigger in that regard.


Obviously he's unable to match powerlifters, I was just pointing out that bodybuilders can lift quite substantial amounts of weight. The world record for a raw deadlift is 1015 lbs (just with a belt, without a suit) so 800 lbs for 2 by a bodybuilder while cutting for the Olympia isn't bad.

I agree with you on suits though, straps and the belt I understand but the suit just seems like it adds weight without the lifter being hte source of it.


Yeah, powerlifting is a bit of a mess of a sport really. It started out as "odd lifts" not included in the Olympic lifts. At the beginning of the sport, the curl was a contested lift. I think Olympic lifting is a lot cooler and a lot more impressive, but...it's hard, and very very technique based. Olympic lifting, to avoid the whole suits and whatever, just settled on knee wraps and and wrist brace type straps (though not strap straps.) Powerlifting is kinda ridiculous in the "100% raw" kinda thing, too, as they even ban, say, $3 knee sleeves just to keep your knees warmed up to prevent tendinitis. Oh, and belts are allowed in OL, too.

I see Olympic lifting as sort of the "Orthodox" of weightlifting if you would, it's remained reasonably consistent through the years (no more press, though, which I guess is a fair decision) and they seem to be the most truly strong people around. I've even heard some of the small/medium weight Olympic lifters were tested in track and field events and did as well as people trained for the events. I read something like, I forget the exact numbers, but I think it was like, deadlifting 400lbs from the ground takes 400 watts (or maybe kilojoules or joules, some unit of energy) of energy and then snatching the same 400lbs takes like 1600. So oddly, powerlifters may be able to generate more force, but Olympic lifters actually generate more power wattage wise. I don't know, I just see Olympic lifting as like "the real thing" I guess. And I guess I'm just obsessed with finding "the real thing" with everything.
--------
But, everyone has their things they like, it's just to me, bodybuilding mindset is just hard to really "get." Like I tried doing like, some tricep extensions and curls like a dumbass at the gym, before I started like, working out at all, and I just felt...dumb. Besides like, not being fat, it's just hard for me to care much about my physique. For me, I guess my psychological makeup or whatever just likes the feeling of being more powerful, and as far as physique goes, as long as I'm lean, the muscles will look like whatever. Also, too, as a kid, throughout high school, I always just wished to be skinnier, in high school, yes I was overweight, but I always envied the 120-130lb kids, but that's just not in the genetic cards for me, I packed too much muscular weight even without working out (mostly my legs) to ever be that weight. Ideally, I'd love to be that weight with the same strength I have now, but I know that's not happening unless I spent some time in a concentration camp. So bodybuilding, you know, getting "huge" and whatnot is sorta an odd concept for me to comprehend. But, more power is easy to comprehend for me, it's a very "concrete" thing, it's not like physique where looks is all in the eye of the beholder (as seen in this thread alone) you either can lift the weight or you can't. I guess that suits my "Aspie" sensibilities better.

And for PL, too, regarding superheavies and whatnot, I see those people as really cool, though I wouldn't wanna be one. They got balls of steel for doing what they do. There's not much fame and fortune to be had powerlifting, as nobody really cares, but they go balls to the wall and do whatever it takes, even if it means getting fat, to lift the weights they lift up. It's an idea that's almost the opposite of the way modern society thinks, with everything being superficial, and about how things look, instead of how they perform.

Anyway, done with the philosophical ranting. Anyway, OP, what I was trying to say was abs are best trained isometrically as that's how they work in real life. Also OP, I thought of a hypothesis today. Since the abs are mostly worked isometrically supporting you while you lift things up/do things, is one of your legs less strong than the other? If one leg is more or less strong, I'd think the abs would develop along with the legs in some sense, either the abs would get bigger from, say, if you played soccer, kicking the soccer ball with your right or left leg, or conversely, it could also be possible the abs would have to do more work on the side with the less strong leg. Just something to add to the hypothesis. It also could be due to having a short leg, too, I know my right leg is shorter by like 5-6mm.



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28 Jun 2012, 6:11 pm

1000Knives wrote:
TM wrote:
1000Knives wrote:
Well, apparently 800something for a double with straps. So not really legal, but hey, 800 is still impressive. But, by PL standards, he'd be competing in superheavyweight at his bodyweight. Also by PL standards, 800 is more or less the record for 180-195 weight classes, and that's without straps (but possibly suited, which suited powerlifting seems ridiculous to me.) So he's not that competitive by PL standards, but hey, he's strong, he gets credit for that. But Dimitry Klokov, an Olympic lifter, there's a video of him around doing 800 for 3 or something, at about 200lb bodyweight.

One thing bodybuilders do usually have to their advantage is muscular endurance, powerlifters only train for one rep maxes, so they don't train to lift heavy continuously. In general, bigger muscles can carry more glucose/creatine, so there is an advantage to being bigger in that regard.


Obviously he's unable to match powerlifters, I was just pointing out that bodybuilders can lift quite substantial amounts of weight. The world record for a raw deadlift is 1015 lbs (just with a belt, without a suit) so 800 lbs for 2 by a bodybuilder while cutting for the Olympia isn't bad.

I agree with you on suits though, straps and the belt I understand but the suit just seems like it adds weight without the lifter being hte source of it.


Yeah, powerlifting is a bit of a mess of a sport really. It started out as "odd lifts" not included in the Olympic lifts. At the beginning of the sport, the curl was a contested lift. I think Olympic lifting is a lot cooler and a lot more impressive, but...it's hard, and very very technique based. Olympic lifting, to avoid the whole suits and whatever, just settled on knee wraps and and wrist brace type straps (though not strap straps.) Powerlifting is kinda ridiculous in the "100% raw" kinda thing, too, as they even ban, say, $3 knee sleeves just to keep your knees warmed up to prevent tendinitis. Oh, and belts are allowed in OL, too.

I see Olympic lifting as sort of the "Orthodox" of weightlifting if you would, it's remained reasonably consistent through the years (no more press, though, which I guess is a fair decision) and they seem to be the most truly strong people around. I've even heard some of the small/medium weight Olympic lifters were tested in track and field events and did as well as people trained for the events. I read something like, I forget the exact numbers, but I think it was like, deadlifting 400lbs from the ground takes 400 watts (or maybe kilojoules or joules, some unit of energy) of energy and then snatching the same 400lbs takes like 1600. So oddly, powerlifters may be able to generate more force, but Olympic lifters actually generate more power wattage wise. I don't know, I just see Olympic lifting as like "the real thing" I guess. And I guess I'm just obsessed with finding "the real thing" with everything.
--------
But, everyone has their things they like, it's just to me, bodybuilding mindset is just hard to really "get." Like I tried doing like, some tricep extensions and curls like a dumbass at the gym, before I started like, working out at all, and I just felt...dumb. Besides like, not being fat, it's just hard for me to care much about my physique. For me, I guess my psychological makeup or whatever just likes the feeling of being more powerful, and as far as physique goes, as long as I'm lean, the muscles will look like whatever. Also, too, as a kid, throughout high school, I always just wished to be skinnier, in high school, yes I was overweight, but I always envied the 120-130lb kids, but that's just not in the genetic cards for me, I packed too much muscular weight even without working out (mostly my legs) to ever be that weight. Ideally, I'd love to be that weight with the same strength I have now, but I know that's not happening unless I spent some time in a concentration camp. So bodybuilding, you know, getting "huge" and whatnot is sorta an odd concept for me to comprehend. But, more power is easy to comprehend for me, it's a very "concrete" thing, it's not like physique where looks is all in the eye of the beholder (as seen in this thread alone) you either can lift the weight or you can't. I guess that suits my "Aspie" sensibilities better.

And for PL, too, regarding superheavies and whatnot, I see those people as really cool, though I wouldn't wanna be one. They got balls of steel for doing what they do. There's not much fame and fortune to be had powerlifting, as nobody really cares, but they go balls to the wall and do whatever it takes, even if it means getting fat, to lift the weights they lift up. It's an idea that's almost the opposite of the way modern society thinks, with everything being superficial, and about how things look, instead of how they perform.

Anyway, done with the philosophical ranting. Anyway, OP, what I was trying to say was abs are best trained isometrically as that's how they work in real life.


I used to train for PL, since I'm naturally built for it I guess. I did 130kgs on my first dead ever and started squats at like 70 - 80kgs. However, as I was going along, I just started getting a bit into trying to look good as well as being strong. Atm, I'm quite over the top on body fat from bulking to push my lifts up (and a sweet tooth) and it would be nice to see how I look underneath it.

Bodybuilding has gone way over the top with guys like Ronnie, Yates was "ok" in a sense, because he still looked human in contest shape, Coleman just looks like some human-gorilla hybrid (no racism) with a tackle box full of supplements. Bodybuilding used to be about recreating the "perfect proportions" not about getting as huge as humanly possible using any and all drugs you can get your hands on.

Oly lifting is cool, but its so technique oriented, hence why the Oly lifters lift so much in proportion to body weight. The whole sport is about generating force in a short time. I'd prefer if they had the deadlift and bench press in oly lifting still, to round it out a bit. At the moment, it's a bit like if the only running distance was the 100m.



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28 Jun 2012, 6:36 pm

TM wrote:
1000Knives wrote:
TM wrote:
1000Knives wrote:
Well, apparently 800something for a double with straps. So not really legal, but hey, 800 is still impressive. But, by PL standards, he'd be competing in superheavyweight at his bodyweight. Also by PL standards, 800 is more or less the record for 180-195 weight classes, and that's without straps (but possibly suited, which suited powerlifting seems ridiculous to me.) So he's not that competitive by PL standards, but hey, he's strong, he gets credit for that. But Dimitry Klokov, an Olympic lifter, there's a video of him around doing 800 for 3 or something, at about 200lb bodyweight.

One thing bodybuilders do usually have to their advantage is muscular endurance, powerlifters only train for one rep maxes, so they don't train to lift heavy continuously. In general, bigger muscles can carry more glucose/creatine, so there is an advantage to being bigger in that regard.


Obviously he's unable to match powerlifters, I was just pointing out that bodybuilders can lift quite substantial amounts of weight. The world record for a raw deadlift is 1015 lbs (just with a belt, without a suit) so 800 lbs for 2 by a bodybuilder while cutting for the Olympia isn't bad.

I agree with you on suits though, straps and the belt I understand but the suit just seems like it adds weight without the lifter being hte source of it.


Yeah, powerlifting is a bit of a mess of a sport really. It started out as "odd lifts" not included in the Olympic lifts. At the beginning of the sport, the curl was a contested lift. I think Olympic lifting is a lot cooler and a lot more impressive, but...it's hard, and very very technique based. Olympic lifting, to avoid the whole suits and whatever, just settled on knee wraps and and wrist brace type straps (though not strap straps.) Powerlifting is kinda ridiculous in the "100% raw" kinda thing, too, as they even ban, say, $3 knee sleeves just to keep your knees warmed up to prevent tendinitis. Oh, and belts are allowed in OL, too.

I see Olympic lifting as sort of the "Orthodox" of weightlifting if you would, it's remained reasonably consistent through the years (no more press, though, which I guess is a fair decision) and they seem to be the most truly strong people around. I've even heard some of the small/medium weight Olympic lifters were tested in track and field events and did as well as people trained for the events. I read something like, I forget the exact numbers, but I think it was like, deadlifting 400lbs from the ground takes 400 watts (or maybe kilojoules or joules, some unit of energy) of energy and then snatching the same 400lbs takes like 1600. So oddly, powerlifters may be able to generate more force, but Olympic lifters actually generate more power wattage wise. I don't know, I just see Olympic lifting as like "the real thing" I guess. And I guess I'm just obsessed with finding "the real thing" with everything.
--------
But, everyone has their things they like, it's just to me, bodybuilding mindset is just hard to really "get." Like I tried doing like, some tricep extensions and curls like a dumbass at the gym, before I started like, working out at all, and I just felt...dumb. Besides like, not being fat, it's just hard for me to care much about my physique. For me, I guess my psychological makeup or whatever just likes the feeling of being more powerful, and as far as physique goes, as long as I'm lean, the muscles will look like whatever. Also, too, as a kid, throughout high school, I always just wished to be skinnier, in high school, yes I was overweight, but I always envied the 120-130lb kids, but that's just not in the genetic cards for me, I packed too much muscular weight even without working out (mostly my legs) to ever be that weight. Ideally, I'd love to be that weight with the same strength I have now, but I know that's not happening unless I spent some time in a concentration camp. So bodybuilding, you know, getting "huge" and whatnot is sorta an odd concept for me to comprehend. But, more power is easy to comprehend for me, it's a very "concrete" thing, it's not like physique where looks is all in the eye of the beholder (as seen in this thread alone) you either can lift the weight or you can't. I guess that suits my "Aspie" sensibilities better.

And for PL, too, regarding superheavies and whatnot, I see those people as really cool, though I wouldn't wanna be one. They got balls of steel for doing what they do. There's not much fame and fortune to be had powerlifting, as nobody really cares, but they go balls to the wall and do whatever it takes, even if it means getting fat, to lift the weights they lift up. It's an idea that's almost the opposite of the way modern society thinks, with everything being superficial, and about how things look, instead of how they perform.

Anyway, done with the philosophical ranting. Anyway, OP, what I was trying to say was abs are best trained isometrically as that's how they work in real life.


I used to train for PL, since I'm naturally built for it I guess. I did 130kgs on my first dead ever and started squats at like 70 - 80kgs. However, as I was going along, I just started getting a bit into trying to look good as well as being strong. Atm, I'm quite over the top on body fat from bulking to push my lifts up (and a sweet tooth) and it would be nice to see how I look underneath it.

Bodybuilding has gone way over the top with guys like Ronnie, Yates was "ok" in a sense, because he still looked human in contest shape, Coleman just looks like some human-gorilla hybrid (no racism) with a tackle box full of supplements. Bodybuilding used to be about recreating the "perfect proportions" not about getting as huge as humanly possible using any and all drugs you can get your hands on.

Oly lifting is cool, but its so technique oriented, hence why the Oly lifters lift so much in proportion to body weight. The whole sport is about generating force in a short time. I'd prefer if they had the deadlift and bench press in oly lifting still, to round it out a bit. At the moment, it's a bit like if the only running distance was the 100m.


I can see your point, though deads and benches were never part of OL lifting (at least I think) they used to have odder lifts, though, like one arm snatches and stuff. The press would be good in OL lifting, but the problem was, it became a weird cheaty kinda movement, too, with Alexeev doing basically standing incline presses with some knee bend to boot. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7erVblY7aiU

Heh, those are about the weights I started with squatting and deadlifting. I started like 250lbs for deadlifts, and I was squatting 225 with a manta ray to maybe parallel my first time ever squatting. I got to 365 for 5 with a manta ray on, to "maybe parallel" but then I got a weird complex going on cuz a trainer told me I was off my toes too much (nobody ever said anything about depth, but then I saw OL squats and was like "Oh...", that and nobody squats deep or heavy at my gym anyway.) and then I basically stopped squatting for a while. My last parallel squat check was 275x5 without a manta ray, but now I only do Olympic depth squats, my best Olympic depth squat was like 230 or 240, with my best front squat being 180. Dead now is at 355, and I felt like I had more in the tank, so I'm thinking 400 would be reasonable to aim for. I'm holding off squatting a lot, though, as I really think I need OL lifting shoes, as I end up with random little ankle tendon pulls from squatting deep with really flat/thin soled shoes like I normally wear.



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28 Jun 2012, 6:36 pm

kx250rider wrote:
Kurgan wrote:

Abs on a skinny guy are like tits on a fat chick--they don't count! :P


My wife says she doesn't think huge guys are attractive, if the choice is smaller overall with fine-cut abs and definition. Too extreme of anything is probably not so good, so I think the goal (for me at least), is balanced between big and cut. I could have arms and pecs twice the size I am, but the abs would go away. Huge upper body with no neck, and no abs looks older, while less-than-huge arms & chest with sharp-edged abs and visible heads of the delts, etc., is younger-looking.

Charles


Don't get me wrong, by "skinny guy", I don't mean someone who's hovering around a BMI of 24—25 at a 5-ish percent body fat, but those scrawny guys with 12" arms who think they have six-pack abs just because you can see the contours of their abs.



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29 Jun 2012, 12:43 am

Kurgan wrote:
kx250rider wrote:
Kurgan wrote:

Abs on a skinny guy are like tits on a fat chick--they don't count! :P


My wife says she doesn't think huge guys are attractive, if the choice is smaller overall with fine-cut abs and definition. Too extreme of anything is probably not so good, so I think the goal (for me at least), is balanced between big and cut. I could have arms and pecs twice the size I am, but the abs would go away. Huge upper body with no neck, and no abs looks older, while less-than-huge arms & chest with sharp-edged abs and visible heads of the delts, etc., is younger-looking.

Charles


Don't get me wrong, by "skinny guy", I don't mean someone who's hovering around a BMI of 24—25 at a 5-ish percent body fat, but those scrawny guys with 12" arms who think they have six-pack abs just because you can see the contours of their abs.

well, technically they DO have 6-pack abs, they just obtained them another way.


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29 Jun 2012, 1:17 am

hyperlexian wrote:
Kurgan wrote:
kx250rider wrote:
Kurgan wrote:

Abs on a skinny guy are like tits on a fat chick--they don't count! :P


My wife says she doesn't think huge guys are attractive, if the choice is smaller overall with fine-cut abs and definition. Too extreme of anything is probably not so good, so I think the goal (for me at least), is balanced between big and cut. I could have arms and pecs twice the size I am, but the abs would go away. Huge upper body with no neck, and no abs looks older, while less-than-huge arms & chest with sharp-edged abs and visible heads of the delts, etc., is younger-looking.

Charles


Don't get me wrong, by "skinny guy", I don't mean someone who's hovering around a BMI of 24—25 at a 5-ish percent body fat, but those scrawny guys with 12" arms who think they have six-pack abs just because you can see the contours of their abs.

well, technically they DO have 6-pack abs, they just obtained them another way.


Right, as do all humans, they're what keep our internal organs inside of our bodies.



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29 Jun 2012, 10:35 am

1000Knives wrote:
Yeah, powerlifting is a bit of a mess of a sport really. It started out as "odd lifts" not included in the Olympic lifts. At the beginning of the sport, the curl was a contested lift. I think Olympic lifting is a lot cooler and a lot more impressive, but...it's hard, and very very technique based. Olympic lifting, to avoid the whole suits and whatever, just settled on knee wraps and and wrist brace type straps (though not strap straps.) Powerlifting is kinda ridiculous in the "100% raw" kinda thing, too, as they even ban, say, $3 knee sleeves just to keep your knees warmed up to prevent tendinitis. Oh, and belts are allowed in OL, too.

I see Olympic lifting as sort of the "Orthodox" of weightlifting if you would, it's remained reasonably consistent through the years (no more press, though, which I guess is a fair decision) and they seem to be the most truly strong people around. I've even heard some of the small/medium weight Olympic lifters were tested in track and field events and did as well as people trained for the events. I read something like, I forget the exact numbers, but I think it was like, deadlifting 400lbs from the ground takes 400 watts (or maybe kilojoules or joules, some unit of energy) of energy and then snatching the same 400lbs takes like 1600. So oddly, powerlifters may be able to generate more force, but Olympic lifters actually generate more power wattage wise. I don't know, I just see Olympic lifting as like "the real thing" I guess. And I guess I'm just obsessed with finding "the real thing" with everything.
--------
But, everyone has their things they like, it's just to me, bodybuilding mindset is just hard to really "get." Like I tried doing like, some tricep extensions and curls like a dumbass at the gym, before I started like, working out at all, and I just felt...dumb. Besides like, not being fat, it's just hard for me to care much about my physique. For me, I guess my psychological makeup or whatever just likes the feeling of being more powerful, and as far as physique goes, as long as I'm lean, the muscles will look like whatever. Also, too, as a kid, throughout high school, I always just wished to be skinnier, in high school, yes I was overweight, but I always envied the 120-130lb kids, but that's just not in the genetic cards for me, I packed too much muscular weight even without working out (mostly my legs) to ever be that weight. Ideally, I'd love to be that weight with the same strength I have now, but I know that's not happening unless I spent some time in a concentration camp. So bodybuilding, you know, getting "huge" and whatnot is sorta an odd concept for me to comprehend. But, more power is easy to comprehend for me, it's a very "concrete" thing, it's not like physique where looks is all in the eye of the beholder (as seen in this thread alone) you either can lift the weight or you can't. I guess that suits my "Aspie" sensibilities better.

And for PL, too, regarding superheavies and whatnot, I see those people as really cool, though I wouldn't wanna be one. They got balls of steel for doing what they do. There's not much fame and fortune to be had powerlifting, as nobody really cares, but they go balls to the wall and do whatever it takes, even if it means getting fat, to lift the weights they lift up. It's an idea that's almost the opposite of the way modern society thinks, with everything being superficial, and about how things look, instead of how they perform.

Anyway, done with the philosophical ranting. Anyway, OP, what I was trying to say was abs are best trained isometrically as that's how they work in real life. Also OP, I thought of a hypothesis today. Since the abs are mostly worked isometrically supporting you while you lift things up/do things, is one of your legs less strong than the other? If one leg is more or less strong, I'd think the abs would develop along with the legs in some sense, either the abs would get bigger from, say, if you played soccer, kicking the soccer ball with your right or left leg, or conversely, it could also be possible the abs would have to do more work on the side with the less strong leg. Just something to add to the hypothesis. It also could be due to having a short leg, too, I know my right leg is shorter by like 5-6mm.


I'm a bodybuilder, but also keep tabs on my record max lifts (heavy lifts suspended for now due to a health issue). Powerlifting is definitely my secondary goal, though. My max is 597 lbs, but cheated since I lifted from a 20" platform and not from the ground. That's my avatar picture, in fact. It was just a show-off stunt. I confess, the bodybuilding is for vanity in large part, in my case. I was always the library nerd/tech geek, and was jealous of the jocks with all the girls' attention. That's probably why I got into it, and it feels really good to see people checking me out, but also it's a HECK of a lot of work, sacrifice, and dedication to get here, which I know I don't have to tell anyone who has done it too.

I agree that nowadays, bodybuilding is quite a different goal, and in fact a whole different sport, than powerlifting or of Olympic lifting. As for the vanity goal, I want to know that if I want to, I can take my shirt off in front of a bunch of 20-year-old guys, and they'll be envious while their girlfriends check me out. Not to the point of causing trouble, though ;-)

Charles



1000Knives
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29 Jun 2012, 10:59 am

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62DrLnV8Tsk[/youtube]

The beginning portion of that anime opening pretty much sums up my training rationale.



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29 Jun 2012, 12:10 pm

kx250rider wrote:
I confess, the bodybuilding is for vanity in large part, in my case. I was always the library nerd/tech geek, and was jealous of the jocks with all the girls' attention.


While I wouldn't consider myself a bodybuilder in the traditional sense, I have developed quite a good physique over the past year, and while I do like looking buff and healthy, the attention is rather annoying to me. When I started, I thought it would be awesome to be able to show the world how good I feel. Especially other men sometimes give me a look that pretty much seems to say: "Look at that show-off dumb weightlifting idiot, trying to make me look like a chump!", like seriously, I can feel the disgust, and somehow, the time when I was obese, they belittled me, but didn't pay much attention to me. Maybe I still gotta get used to it, but I can't help but detest the feeling that other men see nothing more in me than competition that deliberately tries to make them look like lazy lard-asses. I know how much dedication it requires to build and keep up a good physique, and I wish they would acknowledge that part more. Sometimes I feel whatever you do, people are going to hate you for it.



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29 Jun 2012, 12:14 pm

starryeyedvoyager wrote:
kx250rider wrote:
I confess, the bodybuilding is for vanity in large part, in my case. I was always the library nerd/tech geek, and was jealous of the jocks with all the girls' attention.


While I wouldn't consider myself a bodybuilder in the traditional sense, I have developed quite a good physique over the past year, and while I do like looking buff and healthy, the attention is rather annoying to me. When I started, I thought it would be awesome to be able to show the world how good I feel. Especially other men sometimes give me a look that pretty much seems to say: "Look at that show-off dumb weightlifting idiot, trying to make me look like a chump!", like seriously, I can feel the disgust, and somehow, the time when I was obese, they belittled me, but didn't pay much attention to me. Maybe I still gotta get used to it, but I can't help but detest the feeling that other men see nothing more in me than competition that deliberately tries to make them look like lazy lard-asses. I know how much dedication it requires to build and keep up a good physique, and I wish they would acknowledge that part more. Sometimes I feel whatever you do, people are going to hate you for it.


Haters gonna hate.



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30 Jun 2012, 12:07 pm

1000Knives wrote:

Haters gonna hate.


True, sadly. Not only for personal attributes like bodybuilding success, but if you have a Ford, there's going to be somebody with a Chevy who ridicules you, and if you're one religion or another, there will be someone against you for that. Bottom line is that we might be best off to do what gives us confidence in ourselves, and be whatever seems successful to us.

Charles



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01 Jul 2012, 4:17 am

Delphiki wrote:
I am starting to actually get some abdominal muscles, and it is becoming more obvious that they are uneven. The abs on my left side appear to be an inch or inch an a half lower than my right ab muscles. I googled it and it says that it is genetic. Frustrating.


Just be glad you've got abs. I've been doing martial arts for over 6 years, I regularly run 10k, don't eat carbs, hardly drink any more and am generally pretty active and I've still got a bit of a tyre even though my body shape has definitely improved.