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jonny23
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29 Jul 2012, 5:33 pm

DrPenguin wrote:
jonny23 wrote:
Surfman wrote:
There are two types of riders

those who have fallen
those who have yet to fall


Yes, wear a helmet and gear! All the guys that think they are to cool for gear don't last long.


too right, I've seen a helmet crack and a metal reinforced leather jacket worn through, if it had been his head or skin..


The two things I was thinking as my head was bouncing down the road after dumping my bike at 60 mph where "Thank god BOUNCE BOUNCE I've got BOUNCE BOUNCE this helmet on! BOUNCE" and "I wonder if there are any cars coming?"



Jinx_fxdi
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30 Jul 2012, 9:00 am

I worked as a medic for a couple of years, two calls that stick out in my mind...
A guy in his 60's bought his first bike and flipped it, a witnesses indo, when we got on scene he was sitting on the tailgate of a truck smoking a cigarette - not wearing a helmet.
.
A guy in his 20's bumped a car and ran into the guard rail. Full carbon fiber protective gear and a full face helmet without a scratch. He died at the scene from blood loss, his leg was removed by the guard rail.
.
Point is... dont think a helmet will save your life. The best helmets on the planet are only rated for a 40mph impact. Once you are on the highway your only guarantee of saftey is avoidance.
.
I personally do not wear a helmet, I would rather be dead vs quad/vegatable. Ride comfortable, not "cool". Let those who ride decide.



kraven
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30 Jul 2012, 9:28 am

GreenShadow wrote:
I've got small question: is anyone here rides motorcycle?
Right here.

How do you deal with engine sound?
I like the sounds of some bikes more than others. The sort of flat sound of a parallel twin engine like the triumph Bonneville leaves me cold. The super loud dissonance of a Harley with loud pipes makes me plug my ears with my fingers. The sound of a Japanese L4 engine, especially the new injected models, makes me happy because they just kind of buzz along. I especially like the 3 cylinder BMW K75 engine because it has no buzzy vibration to speak of when riding.
I keep all my bikes quiet since I'm not a big fan of loud noise.
One bike in particular that I can't stand to hear is the Honda VTX1800. It's a v-twin like a Harley, but has different internal timing of the two cylinders, and it sounds... wrong. More like a garbage truck than a motorcycle.
There are bikes I like to hear loud in short bursts, like vintage Vincents and Indians, but only in short bursts. The noise is just too much.


and with riding between cars?
I try to avoid that. I stay in their line of sight and out of their path, when I can. I like to stay in the lane by the sidewalk so I can dip into a parking lot, if need be.

not forgetting about the balance? and gears shifting?
You steer a bike primarily with your feet, not your hands (except for countersteering). The wheels act as gyroscopes, so you don't have to balance it at speed. At parking speeds, you do, but that's something that you learn to do. I once forgot to put my feet down and promptly fell over on my side in my driveway after work.
Sometimes I forget I'm already in high gear and try to upshift at speed, but most often it becomes automatic to the rider.

Or maybe I should just forget about such activity, cause motorcycles are not for Aspies?

Not true. However, if you tend to be someone who drifts off into thought, it's either a good therapy for that, or impending doom. I like how I can be in the moment when riding.
You learn to give and take with the weather, you taste the seasons as they change, and you become and amateur meteorologist of sorts.



kx250rider
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30 Jul 2012, 11:51 am

GreenShadow wrote:
I've got small question: is anyone here rides motorcycle?


How do you deal with engine sound?

and with riding between cars?

not forgetting about the balance? and gears shifting?


Or maybe I should just forget about such activity, cause motorcycles are not for Aspies?


I've been riding since I was 13, and love it, and would hate to ever give it up!

Mainly now, I ride on the street, but I used to do a lot more dirt & non-competition motocross.

On the engine sound, I don't have an issue with it because I'm on the bike, and due to physics and acoustics, the sound is mainly all behind me, and not projected at me. I despise the sound of Harley type bikes as a bystander (no offense to my Harley-rider friends). Sport bikes are a whole different sound; almost a whine like a mutant mosquito on steroids, and it's not as skull-splitting as the deep rumble of the V-twin bikes.

Between cars; only when absolutely necessary. It makes me nervous because many people won't think or look before maybe popping their door open to re-slam it, or even to spit :x . I'll go between cars when there is heavy traffic at stop-n-go speeds on the freeways where there is a division between the carpool lane and the left regular lane, AND ONLY when the traffic is moving at 5 mph or so (too slow for a motorcycle to balance). Or I will pass between lanes if I am approaching an intersection with a red light and a long line of stopped traffic. But I won't do it EVER in moving traffic on city streets, even though it is perfectly legal in CA to do that. Too mahy people making last-second decisions to turn onto side streets or pop out of driveways, etc.

Balance is subconscious (at least for me), and it's not possible to "forget" unless maybe a person has a physical or neurological problem, I think. Basically, I look where I want the bike to go, and it goes there even if I let go of the bars altogether (except for countersteering as in a quick turn, where you need to nudge the bar to throw you into a turn when your body positioning alone wouldn't overcome the inertia of the bike going straight up).

Shifting gears is automatic for me, but I do occasionally try to upshift when already in high gear. I don't think that's an autism thing. I think everyone does it sometimes; particularly if you own several bikes with different numbers of gears. Two of mine are 1 down/4 up, but my Yamaha R1 is 1 down/5 up, and it has a very high RPM range, which tricks my mind when I'm used to lower-RPM big bikes.

These are mine: Left to right; 1985 Yamaha V-Max 1200, 1985 Honda VF1000R, 2000 Yamaha R1, and the one on the right (backed-in) is my wife's '03 Suzuki DR650.


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jonny23
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30 Jul 2012, 12:27 pm

Jinx_fxdi wrote:
I worked as a medic for a couple of years, two calls that stick out in my mind...
A guy in his 60's bought his first bike and flipped it, a witnesses indo, when we got on scene he was sitting on the tailgate of a truck smoking a cigarette - not wearing a helmet.
.
A guy in his 20's bumped a car and ran into the guard rail. Full carbon fiber protective gear and a full face helmet without a scratch. He died at the scene from blood loss, his leg was removed by the guard rail.
.
Point is... dont think a helmet will save your life. The best helmets on the planet are only rated for a 40mph impact. Once you are on the highway your only guarantee of saftey is avoidance.
.
I personally do not wear a helmet, I would rather be dead vs quad/vegatable. Ride comfortable, not "cool". Let those who ride decide.


No offense but your comparison isn't very scientific. Nor is anyone claiming that a helmet will keep your legs from being removed. Scientist have studied thousands of accidents and there conclusions are without a doubt that you have better odds of sustaining less injury by wearing a helmet. Is this always true? No, in certain circumstances a helmet can even hurt you but it's an odd game and the odds are better with a helmet. Also, helmets aren't rated by MPH and you are less likely to sustain brain damage if you wear one.

I support everyone's right to choose if they will wear one but don't go spreading misinformation. People need to be informed so they can make their decision based on facts.

http://www.ultimatemotorcycling.com/mot ... save-lives
http://www.smarter-usa.org/PDF%20DOCUME ... elmets.pdf
http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/pubs/811159.pdf



BoneslyGrifter
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30 Jul 2012, 12:58 pm

I'm saving up for a Yamaha Stryker. Motorcycle noise hasn't ever bothered me unless it's from a whiny crotch-rocket. No offense to sports-bike riders, I love the way the bikes look but I like a lower center of gravity. Low rumbly engines, please.



TalksToCats
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30 Jul 2012, 1:18 pm

Motorcycles are one of my main loves. I don't have access to one at the moment :( but hope to again soon...

I rode nearly daily for about 15 years and only stopped doing this as phsycial health issues (not caused by riding motorbikes) restricted how much I could ride.

As kx250rider said the sound is not a problem when you are on the bike as it is behind you. There can be a lot of wind noise at higher speed but this gets a lot better if you wear ear plugs or have a bike with a fairing. Earplugs are recommended anyway otherwise you can get mild deafness from wind noise later on (I speak from personal experience here - I was sceptical I needed ear plugs for a while and now have very mild deafness - issues hearing when there is significant background noise - as a result).

As far as balance went I had no problems - but when I started riding I could already ride a standard bicycle and had also ridden horses a lot - I don't know if this helped. The only issues can be riding at very low speed, but this depends a lot on the bike, some are more stable at low speed than others, but you don't get a bike to ride it at 5-10 mph everywhere :).

It took a while to learn to deal with all the things I had to think about on the road, but the actual riding bit was relatively straight forward.

I found riding a bike a lot more intuitive and easier than driving a car (which I learnt to do later) it kind of goes where you point it...

As others have said you will almost certainly fall off while learning, so the right kit is ESSENTIAL. I fell off at very low speed in ordinary jeans once and was amazed how easily they ripped. I was just a bit grazed but after that almost always wore leathers.

I also came off in full leathers and was unlucky enough to have a sharp stone or something go through and cut a hole in my knee - I had insufficent knee protection in the leathers - (it was all stitched up as good as new but I have a fancy scar and I'll probably have arthritus in it by my 50s...)

In the UK helmets are mandatory and are labelled as to the standard they meet (don't know how this is done elsewhere) the highest spec are designed for the race track and for coming off at speeds much higher than 40mph...

I would personally recommend riding in leathers or one of the modern rip-stop fabrics (not sure what's available now) and integral body armour, along with a full face helmet, to protect yourself.

All that said once I got experienced, riding a motorcycle has given me the best experiences of my life, the bike has felt like an extension of me at times, it was great.

It almost became a kind of (very switched on) meditative processs, I was able to just concentrate on riding and nothing else, great for getting away from stresses.

I personally don't think you've lived properly 'til you've ridden a motorbike or scooter on twisty roads through mountains (Scottish Highlands in my case).

I'd recommend motorbikes or scooters to everyone, but I am significantly biased.



GreenShadow
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30 Jul 2012, 2:19 pm

So, speaking about balance - if I can ride my MTB (and I can do it really well) - I shouldn't have any problems with motorcycle?


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jonny23
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30 Jul 2012, 2:40 pm

GreenShadow wrote:
So, speaking about balance - if I can ride my MTB (and I can do it really well) - I shouldn't have any problems with motorcycle?


I'd say you'll be fine.



Jinx_fxdi
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30 Jul 2012, 3:12 pm

I understand what the statistics say, but statistics can be read different ways. I was not trying to quote the stats, just personal observation from a non-helmet standpoint. In other words...
.
Can it save your life? Absolutly without a doubt.
WILL it save your life? I wouldnt bet my life on it.
.
And like I said, I would rather be dead vs alive with massive damage. I had my jaw broke in a fight years ago, every helmet I have ever tried hurts my jawbone to the point of not riding. I know the risks and possibilities. I just dont like to hear people say that you are not safe unless you wear a helmet, riding a bike is the most dangerous mode of motorized transportation. A helmet is a defence against damage, it does not make you "safer" it just makes it "possible" to bounce your head against pavement and walk away.
.
Not intended as an attack, I just want to make sure I wasnt misunderstood.



Jinx_fxdi
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30 Jul 2012, 3:36 pm

I thought of a better way to say it...
.
Wearing a helmet does not decrease (or increase) the chances of being in a major wreck. Lots of people get the wrong idea when the word "safer" is used, its not safer... but it does give you a better chance of surviving certain situations.



jonny23
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30 Jul 2012, 3:43 pm

Jinx_fxdi wrote:
I understand what the statistics say, but statistics can be read different ways. I was not trying to quote the stats, just personal observation from a non-helmet standpoint. In other words...


I'm not a big fan of statistics either. But here's some more research from Johns Hopkins
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 124141.htm

Jinx_fxdi wrote:
Can it save your life? Absolutly without a doubt.
WILL it save your life? I wouldnt bet my life on it.


No ones arguing a helmet will always save your life.

Jinx_fxdi wrote:
I had my jaw broke in a fight years ago, every helmet I have ever tried hurts my jawbone to the point of not riding. I know the risks and possibilities. I just dont like to hear people say that you are not safe unless you wear a helmet, riding a bike is the most dangerous mode of motorized transportation.


That's why I support the right to choose

Jinx_fxdi wrote:
A helmet is a defence against damage, it does not make you "safer" it just makes it "possible" to bounce your head against pavement and walk away.


I believe by definition that does make you safer, safer from damage.

Jinx_fxdi wrote:
Not intended as an attack, I just want to make sure I wasnt misunderstood.

Not taken that way at all. :D



hans66
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06 May 2013, 4:37 pm

Today I had my first motorcycling lesson. It was about the basics: how to brake, how to start riding, how to walk with your bike, the engine powered off, how to slalom around small pylons which the instructor puts on the exercise terrain, or removes.

I like it, although my riding is a bit clumsy.



LupaLuna
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06 May 2013, 8:36 pm

Used to ride dirt bikes all the time when I was a teen. Now I haven't rode a motor bike in over 20 years.



thegreataturn
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06 May 2013, 9:13 pm

I had a Honda DT175 when I was 15 but ended up burning the engine out as I had a problem changing the gears .

I did ride A 1977 Suzuki GT750 for 4 years and just loved the freedom . Never got in an accident or fell off it and could change the gears by then . Sadly the police took a dim view on my lack of license and it was crushed by them :cry: