Things you were taught were your imagination

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Moondust
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25 Aug 2012, 10:19 am

The very serious problem with therapists is that they're trained to treat a different kind of neurological being. Psychology is good for us, but psychologists are bad for aspies because they don't have a clue what it's like to have a different neurology they never studied or even heard about. Let alone they're totally blind to the fact that they're sitting in front of a person who belongs to a minority of one in his community. All this is disaster waiting to happen if we believe them too much.


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Matt62
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25 Aug 2012, 6:52 pm

Oddly, college did prove to be the best years of my life (so far!) but that did not mean it was a cakewalk! It certainly was not!
And most of my therapists seem to think that I would do all right in group therapy. Not happening! <sigh>

Sincerely,
Matthew



lady_katie
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25 Aug 2012, 7:20 pm

Moondust wrote:
The very serious problem with therapists is that they're trained to treat a different kind of neurological being. Psychology is good for us, but psychologists are bad for aspies because they don't have a clue what it's like to have a different neurology they never studied or even heard about. Let alone they're totally blind to the fact that they're sitting in front of a person who belongs to a minority of one in his community. All this is disaster waiting to happen if we believe them too much.


This is proving to be my experience, so far. I've been in therapy for 4 months. I started because of my anxiety/depression, and soon discovered completely on my own that I have AS. I'm now spending nearly every session trying to convince my therapist that her suggestions are not working for me, and that it's not because I'm refusing to apply them, it's because they do not apply to me. She doesn't believe that I have AS, and instead believes that all of my problems stem from "low self esteem". I like myself just fine, I just don't like the fact that OTHERS don't like me. She doesn't seem to get that.



Moondust
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25 Aug 2012, 7:35 pm

I know, I went through the same. She doesn't believe it even to this day, although she had a conversation with the AS specialist that diagnosed me. The reason they'll never believe us is, as the saying goes "If you have a hammer, you tend to see all problems as nails." It means she'll diagnose you with the illness SHE knows how to cure, so to speak.


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invisiblesilent
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25 Aug 2012, 7:43 pm

I'd like to propose an amendment to that maxim: "If you have a hammer and you are a close minded, stubborn, arrogant fool you tend to see all problems as nails".



Moondust
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25 Aug 2012, 7:48 pm

Actually, my suspicion is: "If you have a hammer and you need people to put your kids through university, you tend to see all problems as nails".


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Webalina
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26 Aug 2012, 12:20 am

Matt62 wrote:
Oddly, college did prove to be the best years of my life (so far!) but that did not mean it was a cakewalk! It certainly was not!
And most of my therapists seem to think that I would do all right in group therapy. Not happening! <sigh>

Sincerely,
Matthew


This happened to me. Back in the 70s when I was a teenager, I was so terrified of people and socializing that my parents put me in therapy. After a couple of solo sessions, the therapist suggested group therapy. I protested but she insisted, although she assured me that I wouldn't have to say a thing in group unless I wanted to. The first group meeting consisted solely of one member crying over how useless and worthless she was. The second meeting started with an announcement that another of the members had committed suicide. After all this and a few more less-traumatic meetings,, I dropped out of the group, figuring the group was going to make me crazier instead of better.



IdahoRose
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26 Aug 2012, 1:35 am

Moondust wrote:
The very serious problem with therapists is that they're trained to treat a different kind of neurological being. Psychology is good for us, but psychologists are bad for aspies because they don't have a clue what it's like to have a different neurology they never studied or even heard about. Let alone they're totally blind to the fact that they're sitting in front of a person who belongs to a minority of one in his community. All this is disaster waiting to happen if we believe them too much.

I agree with this completely. I've been to two different therapists at different times and neither of them were of much help to me.