aspergers being describe as mild autistic disorder?

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21 Feb 2014, 12:16 am

MjrMajorMajor wrote:
Labels are arbitrary. Mine is autistic tendencies (early 1990's). My boy is HFA currently, but has also had the Aspergers label.

I do consider both of us mildly autistic. We have our challenges, but not like those more profoundly impacted. There's no reason we shouldn't recognize our own hardships, without dismissing that others have a more profound hardship. To each as we're able, but without any preconceptions of what that truly encompasses.


So true. My autism is mild than many others but that doesn't mean I have great challenges. I know I go through nothing like those with severe autism do. My sister has mild anxiety and I have severe anxiety. She's told me she can't imagine what it's like for me and that's what most people at the mild end of disorder are like. I could have mild ODD. I argue for the sake of it. I don't have outward anti-social behaviour or get in trouble with the law. It's really difficult for me to deal these mild symptoms though.

So, yeah, I agree. Nothing wrong with pointing out the differences. When people say I'm too mild to be diagnosed at all is when I get on the defensive. Thought I'm not diagnosed with ODD and don't think I need to be. Bad example.


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21 Feb 2014, 1:53 am

I don't know, I think it's pretty damn mild compared to more severe forms of autism.

And you know, I'm on a disability pension for AS too, so I know how severe AS can be.



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21 Feb 2014, 7:33 am

I think the descriptors of "mild" or "severe" are insufficient to describe the various way you can be on the spectrum. After all that is why it is a "spectrum". If you could just classify it as "mild" to "severe" it would merely be a scale. The word "spectrum" is not very precise or descriptive but to me it carries the idea of something more multidimensional which maps quite well to the variety of autistic conditions.

On the other hand, when I read for example Gunilla Gerland's autobiography A real person, it seems obvious that what I have in comparison is indeed "mild". I am not speaking of functioning level here, simply her perception of the world differs much more from neurotypicals than mine.

The main problem I think is that most non-autistic people assume that high functioning = mild. I believe you can have be severely autistic but still manage to be high functioning (with extreme adaptation efforts) and that some people with milder forms can still experience very disabling problems. Having autistic traits is one thing. Being able to adapt to the nt world is something else.


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21 Feb 2014, 4:53 pm

I never really understood why Aspergers was regarded as a different condition to Autism. It makes more sense to me seeing it as mild version of Autism.



naturalplastic
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21 Feb 2014, 8:31 pm

The lady shrink I went to for years "never even heard of aspergers" until my family brought it up. And this was almost a decade after 1994 when it became an official label in the USA.

So I assume that most laypeople dont know aspergers from hamburgers. So if I confide in someone that I have aspergers - i wont even use the word. Ill just say "Ive been diagnosed with a mild form of autism"- or some such phrase because most folks have atleast heard the term "autism"(even if they dont really know what that term means either).



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21 Feb 2014, 8:36 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
The lady shrink I went to for years "never even heard of aspergers" until my family brought it up. And this was almost a decade after 1994 when it became an official label in the USA.

So I assume that most laypeople dont know aspergers from hamburgers. So if I confide in someone that I have aspergers - i wont even use the word. Ill just say "Ive been diagnosed with a mild form of autism"- or some such phrase because most folks have atleast heard the term "autism"(even if they dont really know what that term means either).


I do that too or I'll say mild autism spectrum disorder. I used to say "I have asperger's which is like a mild form of autism". That seemed to make more sense to people.