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rabidrabbit
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14 Sep 2012, 7:09 pm

i like when the second two digits of a license plate can be related to the first two. Such as 4625 4+6 = 2 x 5 ... Or sometimes when its like 9325 and then I can just make it mean something like 5+2+3 is 10 and the 9 ahead of it makes a sequence and it works to make 6 7 if you subtract the first two and add the second two.



Theuniverseman
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14 Sep 2012, 7:24 pm

Plodder wrote:
Theuniverseman wrote:
Give me a planisphere and I can find every constellation above the horizon on any given night, but I already have the vast majority of constellations committed to memory anyway. I can also tell which planets are visible because they bright (no kidding right) but also because they are not part of the zodiacal constellation they happen to be in, I can tell you which planet it is by its color and brightness, this is all so easy for me I frequently forget that most people never even bother to look up much less bother with learning the night sky, kind of sad really.


I don't think that's only related to patterns, it's related to having a good memory. I am very good at noticing patterns but terrible at remembering them. My memory is very bad indeed. You are apparently blessed with the ability to notice patterns and memorise them, too - or perhaps you aren't.

Are these constellations you are memorising patterns that have been noticed by you, or patterns that have been noticed by somebody else, and that you are just copying and committing to memory? Did you notice them yourself of your own accord up in the night sky, or did you memorise a diagram you saw in a book or on the Internet, and then go and look up and realise it was all true, and those patterns were all up in the sky just like the book said? I ask because I have a theory that the better your memory is, the worse you are at spotting patterns, and vice versa - but it's just a private theory of my own, nothing that's been scientifically proven. I can spot all sorts of brilliant patterns, but my memory is like a sieve so it's useless having this pattern-spotting ability unless I quickly go and write the patterns down. It's like I have amnesia or something. LOL


I had a real hard time learning the constellations until I discovered that H.A. Rey wrote The Stars: A New Way to See Them http://books.google.com/books?id=sLq6qg ... &q&f=false

The Constellations are used in astronomy to standardize the labeling of stars, I really have no interest in making up my own constellations (perhaps I ought to try), but it is interesting to note that every culture has its own set of constellation patterns.


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Logicalmom
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14 Sep 2012, 7:49 pm

I've been finding typos in a text we are using. This is how my prof replied to the last one I brought to his attention:


"Thanks for this; that typo has been there for quite a while and it is amazing that neither I nor anyone else has spotted it."

:D LM



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14 Sep 2012, 8:30 pm

The jury is still out on whether I am officially on the spectrum or not, since day to day is pretty easy for me, but one of the most compelling things I have to support that I am (aside from mild face-blindness and sensory issues) is the way I am with number patterns.

When I was young I never had decent grades in math. However, over the years I've discovered that my mind so naturally floats through patterns people use to do math that when I'm in the zone I can somehow give the answer without thinking about the problem at all. I noticed this first when we started doing algebra in middle school, but by the time I was in high school I was even predicting what problems the teacher was going to make up for us next based on the patterns he used to make them.

The oddest part about all of this for me is that it seems to take LESS thinking for me to be able to do these pattern recognition than it does when I am calculating normally. It happens so subconsciously in fact that I actually thought I had psychic powers at first. HAHAHA!

The one sad thing is that it's either on or off for me and I can't control the switch well. Over the years I've clung to types of math that encourage it (calculus, statistics, etc.), but still, when I take standardized tests it's a 50/50 flip as to whether or not I'll score perfectly in the entire math section or score below average.

I'm not sure if you'd call that qualities of a savant or not. I know it is the rarity, even among people on the spectrum. I'm just weird I guess.


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rabidrabbit
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14 Sep 2012, 8:58 pm

Logicalmom wrote:
I've been finding typos in a text we are using. This is how my prof replied to the last one I brought to his attention:


"Thanks for this; that typo has been there for quite a while and it is amazing that neither I nor anyone else has spotted it."

:D LM


I've had to go to pay bills on an estate and every time I go in it's a big hassle so today I looked around the counter top for a typo cause in my head I was going to say, "there's a typo on this" and walk away. I did find a typo but didn't call it out.



Plodder
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14 Sep 2012, 9:37 pm

Theuniverseman wrote:

I had a real hard time learning the constellations until I discovered that H.A. Rey wrote The Stars: A New Way to See Them http://books.google.com/books?id=sLq6qg ... &q&f=false

The Constellations are used in astronomy to standardize the labeling of stars, I really have no interest in making up my own constellations (perhaps I ought to try), but it is interesting to note that every culture has its own set of constellation patterns.


Wow, what a brilliant book! Thanks for the link! I had a look through it and it looks wonderful. If I ever have time to dedicate to stargazing I shall buy it and try to learn some of the constellations. Thank you very much! :)



dizzywater
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14 Sep 2012, 10:02 pm

Once my cousin got a heavily patterned carpet fitted. It was a supposedly random pattern, but to me it clearly repeated.

I was one of the first people to see it and (in my typical untactful way) blurted out that it was awful with all those dark marks on it.

He couldn't see them, so I pointed them out. He said it was part of the pattern, I pointed out the repeats without the dark marks, then he could finally see what was so obvious to me. He agreed that it was badly stained and called the carpet company.

The shop manager called to see the stains, but my cousin had "lost" them, couldn't point them out and kept the carpet in embarrassment, although once I pointed them out again he could see them.

I hated it, the stains were so obvious to me, dark grey smears several inches each, I couldn't understand how he could possibly miss it!

Like mentioned in previous posts, broken patterns are very obvious, they jar against the smoothness of order and are uncomfortable to look at.



Theuniverseman
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14 Sep 2012, 11:47 pm

Plodder wrote:
Theuniverseman wrote:

I had a real hard time learning the constellations until I discovered that H.A. Rey wrote The Stars: A New Way to See Them http://books.google.com/books?id=sLq6qg ... &q&f=false

The Constellations are used in astronomy to standardize the labeling of stars, I really have no interest in making up my own constellations (perhaps I ought to try), but it is interesting to note that every culture has its own set of constellation patterns.


Wow, what a brilliant book! Thanks for the link! I had a look through it and it looks wonderful. If I ever have time to dedicate to stargazing I shall buy it and try to learn some of the constellations. Thank you very much! :)


Your welcome, and it really is an amazing book which has been a cultural influence ever since it was first published, its a classic and it has the easiest to remember constellation illustrations anywhere. Part 4 also has the best explanations of celestial mechanics I have ever read, very clear and understandable explanations of some very difficult concepts which most people find difficult to grasp.

The International Astronomical Union (IAU)
The charts below were produced in collaboration with Sky & Telescope magazine (Roger Sinnott & Rick Fienberg). Alan MacRobert's constellation patterns, drawn in green in the charts, were influenced by those of H. A. Rey but in many cases were adjusted to preserve earlier traditions.
http://www.iau.org/public/constellations/


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phyrehawke
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15 Sep 2012, 12:17 am

Some of you may be interested in Simon Baron Cohen's theory on Hyper Systemizing.
OCD Angel...What you are doing with the spoons is probably in one of the upper levels.
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/518354_2

I seem to be a "heavy user" and it might be an addiction...to "sparkle" instead of "smack", lol.
I see different kinds of patterns, but a good example would be using OCDAngel's spoon's. On one level of SBC's theory they are seen like she sees them, and on another level like I see them. I would get something like a black board with a white dot for every dessert spoon but the soup spoon would be an imposition (oddness) and it would show up as a highlighted white or a highlighted different color, but probably not a highlighted red because a soup spoon is never going to be high risk.
There are many levels to this theory, so lots of different ways to visualize patterns.

I find my patterns to cut down on my stress level in some ways because they can show me pretty specifically how many problems there are in a given system, and I can test to see when they are eliminated. That way if there are a lot of distractions, and some of them seem very similar and not malicious at all, I can probably ignore all the similar ones (although it's kinda hard sometimes). If there is one red highlight in a social pattern then I know I have one major risky person. I can make an effort to figure out who that person is in a very logical way using lists of oddnesses and list of people who had access to those things over time.



Surfman
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15 Sep 2012, 12:29 am

Dont give away your powers, young Luke



phyrehawke
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15 Sep 2012, 2:55 am

Surfman wrote:
Dont give away your powers, young Luke


Well that's the most perfect thing anybody has said all day. I can give away a lot of things foolishly, but nobody can ever take this from me.
And I don't mind sharing at all...with the right folks. I could give and give and never give this away. It's part of who I am. ;)



OCD_Angel
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15 Sep 2012, 5:04 am

phyrehawke wrote:
Some of you may be interested in Simon Baron Cohen's theory on Hyper Systemizing.
OCD Angel...What you are doing with the spoons is probably in one of the upper levels.
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/518354_2

I seem to be a "heavy user" and it might be an addiction...to "sparkle" instead of "smack", lol.
I see different kinds of patterns, but a good example would be using OCDAngel's spoon's. On one level of SBC's theory they are seen like she sees them, and on another level like I see them. I would get something like a black board with a white dot for every dessert spoon but the soup spoon would be an imposition (oddness) and it would show up as a highlighted white or a highlighted different color, but probably not a highlighted red because a soup spoon is never going to be high risk.
There are many levels to this theory, so lots of different ways to visualize patterns.

I find my patterns to cut down on my stress level in some ways because they can show me pretty specifically how many problems there are in a given system, and I can test to see when they are eliminated. That way if there are a lot of distractions, and some of them seem very similar and not malicious at all, I can probably ignore all the similar ones (although it's kinda hard sometimes). If there is one red highlight in a social pattern then I know I have one major risky person. I can make an effort to figure out who that person is in a very logical way using lists of oddnesses and list of people who had access to those things over time.


Thanks for the article! It's very heavy reading because of abstract concepts but I sort of get the gist of it. I don't know that I'm such a high systemizer, since maths and physics generally bore me and I'm a more artistic person. I just have a very keen eye for detail and can immediately spot inconsistencies. I would also think about whether the inconsistencies I spot are actually part of a bigger pattern or are valid mistakes.

About your blackboard with white dots and highlights, do you mean a literal blackboard you draw on, or do you mean just in your mind?



Somberlain
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15 Sep 2012, 7:06 am

Carpets, home wallpapers, growth rings in wood surfaces etc. I tend to move the shapes in my mind when I am looking.
http://media.liveauctiongroup.net/i/552 ... CD1009AF50

I also like ''which number comes next'' thing. I get high scores in IQ tests over internet, but I have no trust in those tests. So, I don't know whether I am above average or not.


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pokerface
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15 Sep 2012, 2:38 pm

OCD_Angel wrote:
So, Aspies supposedly see patterns. When my counsellor was trying to determine whether I had AS, she asked me, "Do you see patterns in things?" I didn't really know what she meant and didn't know how to answer.

I still don't really. Does it mean like, do I see the patterns on flooring tiles and bathroom walls? Who doesn't?
Or does it mean do I see patterns in weather, for example, like maybe 2 days of rain followed by 5 days of sunshine this week?
Or is it a pattern like in IQ tests: 2,4,8,16,32, what comes after?

Can people please give me examples of what patterns you see which makes you an aspie? Do you just see them or do you make them also?



Not all people with aspergers are good at seeing patterns.

According to Temple Grandin and lots of other experts people with aspergers have different skills that can be devided in four different categories. There are aspies who are good at recognizing and seeing patterns, another group of aspies are mathematical thinkers, others are visual thinkers and the last group are verbal thinkers. Combinations are possible ofcourse but most aspies excell in one of these four categories. Visual thinkers. people who think in detailed moving pictures instead of words, usually suck when it comes to recognizing patterns.



BlackDwarf
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15 Sep 2012, 5:43 pm

If I see seemingly random image of dots, marks, images etc, I obsessively analyze it until I see a pattern. If I don't see it then I assume it has no pattern, then funnily enough I may lose interest in it, unless it is a beautiful piece of art.



pokerface
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15 Sep 2012, 7:38 pm

BlackDwarf wrote:
If I see seemingly random image of dots, marks, images etc, I obsessively analyze it until I see a pattern. If I don't see it then I assume it has no pattern, then funnily enough I may lose interest in it, unless it is a beautiful piece of art.


Like a black dwarf.