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gili
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12 Dec 2006, 8:31 pm

My daughter will start college this fall, she has received some excellent schoalrships because of her test scores and grades. She has also been accepted into the honors program there. The question has do with telling the instructors about requiring more time on tests.

What we are not sure of is how they might respond to someone in the honors program asking for extra time on tests. We know that the school recommends students that qualify for this extra time to tell the professor at the begining of the semester. She would need it only on essay type questions or for an opportunity at a more quiet location to avoid noise distractions (sensory issues).

Has anyone on wrongplanet ever run into a difficulty with this type of situation? She is a little unsure about this and I want to ease her anxiety.

Thanks! :roll:



lkonantz
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12 Dec 2006, 10:42 pm

I might be able to help you. However, I do have a question: does your daughter need extra time on test because of a learning disability? The reason I ask is that if the answer is yes, than she should talk to the Disability access or resource services, because they will be able to help her with getting the extra time. I hope this helps you and your daughter.



hell_grey
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13 Dec 2006, 1:50 am

at my school at the beginning of each semester every professor asks to be notified of any "disability" that would interfere with normal testing and learning and whatnot. then they get confirmation from the disability office or whatever. i dont think being in the honors program should present any difficultes. at least as it is at my school, i can't imagine anyone discriminating against a person with a disability, regardless of whether they were in the honors program or not.



gili
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13 Dec 2006, 12:25 pm

lkonantz wrote:
I might be able to help you. However, I do have a question: does your daughter need extra time on test because of a learning disability?


Her handwwriting is slower than it might take to finish long essay questions in a timely fashion. The OT says that is due to her sensory processing. She has always been homeschooled so she has never had an IEP or anything like that. However, she will have the diagnosis from the OT and the psychologist for her AS and sensory problems.
Again thanks :!:



alex
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13 Dec 2006, 12:44 pm

how would her professors know she was in the honors program?


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gili
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13 Dec 2006, 1:33 pm

alex wrote:
how would her professors know she was in the honors program?


The majority probably would not, however some of the courses are taught through the honors college itself. I really do not think that it should matter, but she likes everything to be perfect.



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13 Dec 2006, 1:43 pm

If you are in the US (I'm not certain about UK), and provided your daughter is diagnosed (I'm assuming she is), you will need to get her hooked up with the disabilities office at the college. Once they have her paperwork, they can sort of set up a college level IEP and she can request the accomodations she'll need, such as extended time, computer use for taking notes, someone else to take notes, etc.. Once that's all done, the disbabilities office will inform each of her teachers through writing before class begins (also likely providing a brief description of what the diagnosis means and how they can help her in class) and what accomodations she is afforded.

If she's not registerted with a disabilities office, I doubt the professors will give her extra time. But provided she has a diagnosis, that shouldn't be a problem.


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