Jobs that aren't for Autistic people?

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Aspiewordsmith
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10 Dec 2014, 4:56 pm

Working on a building site is not for Aspies due to the co ordination difficulties as well as the social banter between the 'boys' which may turn into plain bullying.

Yes customer service requires allistic levels of social skills and multitasking. But anyway the selection prcess for any job is not autism/AS friendly.:idea:



freddie_mercury
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10 Dec 2014, 5:46 pm

I am sure that a lot of doctors are on the spectrum. I was on track for medical school (with my eye on surgical pathology) until being diagnosed with a spinal disease.

But I agree about armed services. I dropped out of West Point after Beast (basic training). I just couldn't think straight. There was never any seclusion for me to regroup.

I currently work as a graphic designer. But talking with clients is definetly the hardest part.



Ganondox
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10 Dec 2014, 10:58 pm

1sahne wrote:
btbnnyr wrote:
I know an autistic lawyer. Does family law, divorce, child custody cases.


What will an autist lawyer or judge think about a guy s hyper-controlling and overanxious attitude towards his or her ex-partner? Well, he will not be able to see what s wrong with it, and this is by far not the only wrong judgement he is going to make.

There is only one thing more pathetic than an autist pretending to be normal and getting in a position where he judges about moral, psychological or social issues: a group of fake NTs relying on the seemingly NTs in the group to offset their own deficits. :bigsmurf: :smurfin: :smurf: :brilsmurf:

That is exactly what is happening very often in the judicial system, and in particular in custody battles. Who else than a group of fakes yould have given the sole custody to "little mummy s psychopath" like Usher and Kevin Federline? Have you got an idea what harm is done by this? (The last is a purely rhetorical question: I know you have no idea.)

No way: in law professions a kind of power of judgement is needed, that an autist does not have.
Unless he outs himself and buddies up with two or three lawyers who are definitely NT, but I am afraid there are far too many autists in the field for such a ratio ...


The f**k are you even saying? This is complete nonsense, and from looking at you're profile, it seems clear you've got some sort of bizarre personal agenda against autistic lawyers (who I doubt are actually autistic, it seems more likely you are just labeling unempathetic men as being autistic) making you say something equally bizarre.


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Deb1970
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10 Dec 2014, 11:10 pm

I would have to say retail. I work part time at Walmart and it is the hardest job I have ever had. There's just so much going on. The sounds, lights, smells, customers, co-workers, and allot of multi tasking. I find myself very tired after working only a couple of hours.


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Joe90
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11 Dec 2014, 9:19 am

It does depend on the individual. I know an Aspie who enjoys working behind the bar. That's my idea of a nightmare.

Personally speaking, shyness, anxiety, ADD, and hard of hearing does limit my choice of jobs. I think the best sort of thing for me to do is packing things into boxes or sorting things. Doesn't sound very exciting but at least it reduces stress for me. Most people can adapt to their job if they're not too keen on it, but if there's something about my job that I find stressful, it affects me quite bad and causes panic attacks, even when being on antideprassants.

Currently I do cleaning at a care home. Ok the other workers there are nice, and the work is not too complicated (just common sense really), and I do prefer elderly people to noisy small children. But there are a few things that make me anxious. Usually at Christmas time a vomiting bug goes around, and I have severe emetophobia. That makes life very hard for me at work. Last Christmas there was a bug going round that lasted 2 weeks. I didn't catch it because I was extra careful, but it still made me stressed. I class my emetophobia as crippling because it really is.


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JustSoCurious
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11 Dec 2014, 10:31 am

I actually perform well in situations that most people consider high stress. I feel like I can really focus in on the matter at hand and not get distracted by the calamity reverberating from the crisis. The things I struggle with most are ordinary interactions and conflicts of no serious weight, like customer relations. For instance, in retail, if a customer gets mad about a sweater, or asks a question I don't know, I get super panicky and stressed, even though the real world consequence is nil. It gives me a lot of anxiety, and any semblance of conversation skills that I possess just melt away.

I don't recommend retail at all. The hours are all over the place. You only know your schedule a week or so in advance. People expect you to know everything. Most people don't, but there is a segment of consumers who abuse "the customer is always right" axiom. You have to juggle a bunch of customers at the same time. You forget what the person you were helping looks like. So much chatter from radios, phones, customers, other stores, returns, people trying to haggle deals and coupons, etc. All of that while trying to remain friendly and calm.

Sadly, I worked in retail for a few years because it's a job just about anyone can get, but it's certainly not for everyone. Even people who don't struggle with social interaction seem to dislike it. If you have to get a job in retail, I'd get one in merchandising or the dock so you don't have to interact with customers as much. You just open boxes, move displays, replenish stock, etc. Visual merchandising isn't bad either. Those the people who do all the aesthetics and display decorating.



WAautisticguy
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01 Feb 2015, 4:21 pm

I disagree with not being a teacher. I feel that teaching the very low end of public school, or the high end is a job for an NT. I don't get along well with kindergarten and 1st grade because they never follow directions that well and want to play play play. Sure they might be really cute to see and talk to, but they pick their noses and spit and spread cooties...oh goodness. The junior high part is also bad because they are rowdy, don't give a crap about their teacher, want to get in trouble etc. High school involves way too much "who's best at a sport". As for me, I'm on the road to being a teacher, and my favorite grades are 2nd-4th grade. Those students are not preschoolers, and not immature brats, but still love their teacher. I volunteer with 2nd graders (computer lab) and 3rd graders (normal class) at a local elementary school 1x/week. They are enjoyable to work with. They always say hi to me when I come in. Sure, teaching may be stressful at times, but keeping your cool is the best thing to do. I wouldn't mind teaching 2-4 in the future, or computer lab. The latter is easy, with the 2nd graders I work with, the teacher gives them instructions for the test they have to take, or what website they get to play on that day, headphones go over their ears and they work. 30 minutes later, they take their headphones off, close their webpage and stand behind their chair to line up.

Can agree on retail - after seeing what other people experience with fast food and chain brands, it would be lots of high stress work.

Coaching is also a high stress job, you literally have to yell but keep your cool with the players. With me, I think there would be a lot of feisty arguments with players, which would lead to my ejection.

I would also hate to work as a news anchor or reporter. Way too much publicity and people to interview. Would rather work behind the scenes as a camera guy!

Politician is also very bad as well - high stress, have to deal with high-level people and people that don't agree with what views you agree with.

I probably wouldn't be the best with any job that has a rude/mean boss. There would be a resignment very quickly if that happens. I can't deal with rude people very well. NTs tell me "you are going to have to deal with some people you don't like when you are older, but you have to deal with them"...



darkphantomx1
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01 Feb 2015, 4:25 pm

Well considering 9 out of 10 of those with HFA/Aspergers don't like sports at all, the athlete one is probably true.

You know what I find pretty funny? Out of all the aspies I know that like sports (excluding me) all of them are black. All three of them are into sports. I guess black people are more into sports. Nothing against black people or anything. That's just my observation.



cyberdad
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02 Feb 2015, 6:09 am

darkphantomx1 wrote:
Out of all the aspies I know that like sports (excluding me) all of them are black. All three of them are into sports. I guess black people are more into sports. Nothing against black people or anything. That's just my observation.

Thought I might broaden your horizons
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/olympi ... Games.html



Joe90
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02 Feb 2015, 6:17 am

No job is suitable for me. All jobs I come across all essentially want skills I don't have; excellent communication skills, must be able to work under pressure, must be able to focus, must be flexible, etc. So I am useless. I love typing, but all jobs I look for that are computer-based also want good telephone communication skills. So there's nothing I can do. But I'm able-bodied and able to walk, talk and make decisions, so I am not disabled enough to get help. It's not fair. Then people wonder why I hate being mild/invisible disabilities. :cry:


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felinesaresuperior
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02 Feb 2015, 8:32 am

It's hard to be a cop, because you have to know when someone's lying and when someone's up to no good.
the military, when you're surrounded by people 24/7, and expected to be 'one of the guys'.
work in a night club, those are notorious for noise.


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