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jayroo79
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19 Jan 2013, 12:34 pm

Raziel wrote:
jayroo79 wrote:
As mentioned, a great deal of African American families are not prepared or particularly concerned with paying attention to the signs of what it means to be on the spectrum in general due to a number of other much more pressing issues.


Is this with all psychiatric disorders the case? :?
So, but what do they do if a person gets seriously mentally ill? 8O

And what's with african-american autistics getting serious problems/mentally ill?
Why don't they get recognized by the care givers? :?


A great deal of your questions pertain to how the American Health Care system works. You might want to take some time to research that. Problems in lower socioeconomic status families that pertain to mental health often go untreated and unrecognized unless they are particularly severe. Individuals who are a danger to themselves and others, individuals who would be classified as LFA would get noticed, perhaps treatment, perhaps not depending on the family in question and whether or not social services are involved.


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Chloe33
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19 Jan 2013, 12:48 pm

redrobin62 wrote:
It makes you wonder: in black families, do they bully and/or beat the aspieness out of someone with mild Asperger's?
And what about the comorbids (depression, anxiety, executive function disorder,, etc): do they beat those out of sufferers too? Those conditions get denied often?
Psychologists? "Eh, an invention by white people to squeeze money out of their overly sensitive kind."
Executive function disorder? "Clean up that room now or in five minutes you'll be calling for an ambulance!"
Depressed? "See these fists? I'll give you something to be depressed about!"
Anxious? "Man up, n*gger! Ain't no child of mine anxious!!"
"Mom! My uncle touched me!" "Shut up, boy! I don't wanna hear no nonsense!"


Dude are you white or black or what?
Not all black families act that way. The ways you described actually describe a variety of different ethnicities that could possibly act that way. Why you think all black ones is beyond me.
Did the OP have to be specific and specify where the Black American family originally came from? Was if a part of Africa, or the Islands?

Your almost sounding like an ignorant racist.
I know many black American families who do not treat their mentally ill or Autisitic relatives with abuse and beatings.

You sound like a racist.
You obviously don't know a vast majority of Black folks.
Well i do and my family does and i can assure you that acceptance is what you'll find in the USA nowadays.
Many are members of NAMI (National Alliance of the Mentally Ill) and join groups such as Familya to support their mentally ill relatives.

I'm not saying what you listed is impossible. It's possible in a family, race is irrelevent.
To say that black families are so ignorant as you discribe is obviously racist and disgusting an opinion of you. Where did you get this from watching tv?

What you said is offensive against Black Americans.



scarp
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19 Jan 2013, 3:29 pm

redrobin62 wrote:
There are elements of being an aspie that wouldn't fly in a black family. To wit:

1. Being a picky eater. No choices here. If you didn't eat what the family was eating, you will starve. They'd force you anyway.
2. Tantrums are verboten! One sign of a tantrum and you'd get a lashing you'd feel for days.
3. Sensitive to bright lights? "Deal with it!" your mother would scream.
4. Stimming? "Stop picking that!" or "Stop that damned shaking!" you'd hear in the house. You can't stop but you'd learn to suppress it in company.
5. "Look at me when I'm talking to you!" No eyes to the floor in conversations in a black household.
6. "Come out and say hi to your cousins!" Social issues? Not in a black family. Forced socialization is the norm. Either that or prepare to be homeless.
7. Special interests like your bug collection or encyclopedia reading was frowned upon in favor of basketball games or hanging out.
8. Shy in company? Unheard of. They'd drag you kicking and screaming out of your bedroom to meet strangers as they saw fit.
9. Privacy? Not in a black household. Your door may as well be a sheer curtain.
10. Family outing day to the beach but you want to go to a museum? You may as well pack your things and leave.

Aspie kids get NO support from black families. None, zero, zip. They deny it exists, but if they do see it they look at is as a white man's curse.


I'm a mixed race guy -- my dad's side of the family is from Sierra Leone, and my mom's side is mixed between both Black American and White. So, I guess you could say I'm 75% Black.

Some of these ring true for me and some of these don't. Numbers 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 and 8 ring particularly true on my dad's side of the family.

1. I've always been a very picky eater, and you can understand why this would upset many of my family members who grew up in poverty in West Africa and definitely couldn't afford to be picky growing up. Luckily I do like a lot of traditional African foods, so it was never really a severe problem. Whenever I didn't like something, it was usually met with lite teasing but nothing too bad usually, just annoying. The teasing would usually revolve around me being such an "American boy" or a "White man".

2. I threw a lot of tantrums as a kid, which made my older aunts and uncles look down at and ridicule me. Felt pretty bad.

4. The usual; being told to sit still, cut that out, etc. But I suspect that's more of a general NT adult thing, not just a Black thing.

6/8. I loathed this, especially because I was always demonized for it. Shyness and social anxiety was considered rude and disrespectful. If I wanted to go up to my room, it was decided that it was because I didn't like the people who were visiting. Again, this might just be an extravert/NT thing.

7. "White people stuff." This always infuriated me, because by saying this they were basically debasing not only me but themselves and an entire race of people. I never understood how they could say this without hating themselves a bit. They said it jokingly, but still. :?

~~~

I should note, though, that most of this flack came from my extended family, not my immediate one. My dad is a very smart and hard-working man who liked to read, stay informed, and attended one of the best universities in the country and is now a physician. He encouraged my nerdy tendencies and often defended me from my less forgiving aunts, uncles and cousins. Although despite all that, I don't think he fully understand or appreciates how I struggle in some aspects of life, and didn't even tell me I had AS until a few weeks ago. Would have been nice to know before I totally bombed my first year of college. :roll:

My mom (mixed race) is just as weird if not weirder than me, so we get along well.

And thankfully, I was always given a bunch of privacy and freedom to explore. Good lord, I might have gone crazy if I didn't have at least that. :P

*minor grammar edits were made to this post



Last edited by scarp on 19 Jan 2013, 4:13 pm, edited 2 times in total.

redrobin62
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19 Jan 2013, 3:34 pm

I stand corrected. I was just venting what it felt like for me growing up a mixed black & Asian & gay & intellectual & extremely lonely & bullied person in an intolerant religious black community.



Last edited by redrobin62 on 19 Jan 2013, 3:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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19 Jan 2013, 3:40 pm

redrobin62 wrote:
I stand corrected. I was just venting what it felt like for me growing up a mixed black & Asian & gay & intellectual & extremely lonely person in an intolerant religious black community.


Interesting...



scarp
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19 Jan 2013, 3:44 pm

Also, there are a few other things to bear in mind.

1. As someone else said, for whatever reason, mental disorders generally don't seem to be "on the radar" for a lot of Black families I know. People with an ASD are more likely to be considered peculiar at best, or rude, disrespectful and picky at worst.

Even my dad, a physician and otherwise smart guy, doesn't really seem to "believe" in milder mental conditions like Autism, ADHD and so on. He sees them as something to overcome without special treatment. One thing he said a little while ago worried me; something along the lines of, "When someone comes in to me with depression, I don't send them to a psychiatrist -- I treat them." I didn't say anything, but that made me frustrated. First of all, he doesn't seem to understand depression -- certainly not mine. So the fact that people who need help are coming to him and he's basically giving them a pep talk and sending them away bothers me.

2. I've noticed that certain behaviors are treated differently when they occur in White people vs. when they occur in minority races. Blacks and Hispanics in general seemed to be more likely described as lazy, stupid, disrespectful or just delinquent. The possibility of them struggling mentally doesn't seem to be brought up as quickly. Other children, on the other hand, usually get more sympathy and understanding. Teachers, professionals, etc, seem to approach them with more of an open mind.

It's just what I've observed growing up in the US. I don't mean it to sound accusatory or racially charged, and I certainly don't mean to undermine the struggles of many White children who don't get diagnosed. It's just a sucky situation all around.



Raziel
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19 Jan 2013, 3:51 pm

scarp wrote:
It's just what I've observed growing up in the US. I don't mean it to sound accusatory or racially charged, and I certainly don't mean to undermine the struggles of many White children who don't get diagnosed. It's just a sucky situation all around.


Well I think you are correct.
The extremly low number of black kids getting dx with ASD in the US can just be possible when both factors come together you mentioned:
1) Family who doesn't "believe" in mental/developmental disorders
2) Society who doesn't care that much, because of racial issues


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19 Jan 2013, 4:02 pm

I didn't read all of the posts here so sorry if I'm repeating something that has been said already. I grew up in, and currently live in, a predominately a black community but I am not black. IMO opinion one of the reasons that black people seem to be under diagnosed is because eccentricities are much more tolerated in black communities. This is only one factor, but I strongly believe under diagnosis is mostly a reflection of the inequality black people still face in todays society.



PHISHA51
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19 Jan 2013, 7:04 pm

http://www.wrongplanet.net/postt106250.html


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02 Feb 2013, 9:09 pm

I don't know if I have anything new to add to this thread other than the fact that I was raised by West African parents and am a first generation American. I think the serious lack of understanding of autism among Africans coupled with being the child of immigrants made it especially tricky to deal with this disorder (can we say disorder here?). I think there was an expectation of Africans being happy gregarious people that was totally against my nature and probably disappointed and confused my family a bit. However I do have a brother who has full on autism, he's nonverbal and totally dependant on others for care. Maybe my parents couldn't deal with two kids with " disabilities". Any that's my two cents.



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02 Feb 2013, 9:32 pm

Chloe33 wrote:
redrobin62 wrote:
It makes you wonder: in black families, do they bully and/or beat the aspieness out of someone with mild Asperger's?
And what about the comorbids (depression, anxiety, executive function disorder,, etc): do they beat those out of sufferers too? Those conditions get denied often?
Psychologists? "Eh, an invention by white people to squeeze money out of their overly sensitive kind."
Executive function disorder? "Clean up that room now or in five minutes you'll be calling for an ambulance!"
Depressed? "See these fists? I'll give you something to be depressed about!"
Anxious? "Man up, n*gger! Ain't no child of mine anxious!!"
"Mom! My uncle touched me!" "Shut up, boy! I don't wanna hear no nonsense!"


Dude are you white or black or what?
Not all black families act that way. The ways you described actually describe a variety of different ethnicities that could possibly act that way. Why you think all black ones is beyond me.
Did the OP have to be specific and specify where the Black American family originally came from? Was if a part of Africa, or the Islands?

Your almost sounding like an ignorant racist.
I know many black American families who do not treat their mentally ill or Autisitic relatives with abuse and beatings.

You sound like a racist.
You obviously don't know a vast majority of Black folks.
Well i do and my family does and i can assure you that acceptance is what you'll find in the USA nowadays.
Many are members of NAMI (National Alliance of the Mentally Ill) and join groups such as Familya to support their mentally ill relatives.

I'm not saying what you listed is impossible. It's possible in a family, race is irrelevent.
To say that black families are so ignorant as you discribe is obviously racist and disgusting an opinion of you. Where did you get this from watching tv?

What you said is offensive against Black Americans.


Hi, I think you may have over reacted to the previous poster's 'attempt' at humor. I didn't find his comments racist although they may show a lack of good taste. Part of the reason for this thread may be relevant is that there is currently a 'perception' that differences such as homosexuality are not tolerated in the AA community (I am picking this up from reading articles and not from personal experience). This may be feeding a associated perception that AA culture may not tolerate autistic behavior (tantrums and shouting back at parents due to poor executive control) and shut it out of their community. I think the real reason is socioeconomic where the cost of diagnosis and treatment may be out of the reach of many AAs.



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02 Feb 2013, 9:46 pm

Cinnamon wrote:
For the record: when I was a teenager there was a 'black' (he was more like toffee-brown)


Sorry for the intrusion, but I love that you just said that. One day my daughter was talking about a girl in her class and I wasn't sure who it was so I asked her "Is that the black girl?" She looked at me with the most quizzical look of incredulity and said "What do you mean 'black'? No people are black, mommy! But her skin is a beautiful shade of brown."

In the part of the country where I live, I think immigrant children are underdiagnosed, and many of them happen to be black. I have seen kids that I am fairly sure fall on the spectrum, but I do not believe they are getting support or have a diagnosis, so there may either be lack of knowledge on the parents' part or some cultural norm against seeking help.


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02 Feb 2013, 9:55 pm

OddMommy03 wrote:
At the risk of sounding prejudice (I apologize in advance), I have yet to come across any fellow African-Americans with ASD/Aspergers. In my Aspie Twitter searches, meetup.com group searches, and even from what I read in the forums on this site, it just seems like fellow African American Americans with AS don't exist. Am I wrong? It it that we do exist, but are just undiagnosed? I actually came across this article asking the same question:

http://m.psychologytoday.com/blog/my-li ... -aspergian

Is there a scientific reason for this, or are we just the minority in this group as well? Are there any black Aspies on this site?

(In no way am I prejudiced; I am and have always been a lover of all people, all cultures and especially all music. This was just something I found interesting and was curious.)


"African-American" Aspie standing by.



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03 Feb 2013, 3:25 am

I my opinion it should apply with all families not just African American families is primarily an American family thing families have to consider! Also side note LonelyIsland is African American but regardless she seems to be doing rather well.Aspergers happens to everyone it knows no race!


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16 Feb 2013, 8:25 am

I am half white and half creole (mixed with asian).