Can those with a diagnosis work in psychology?

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MrJosh
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08 Feb 2013, 2:07 pm

I know this question may seem naive, and I do not mean any offence by it either. But after reading that there are some jobs that people with different diagnoses can't do I have this question.

So, can people with a diagnosis of an Autism Spectrum Disorder work in psychology?

Also, can those with a diagnosis of an Anxiety disorder work in this area?

:)



InThisTogether
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08 Feb 2013, 2:14 pm

Most definitely, provided they have the appropriate knowledge and skills.


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08 Feb 2013, 2:15 pm

InThisTogether wrote:
Most definitely, provided they have the appropriate knowledge and skills.


That, totally.

All because you need psychological services doesn't mean you can't work in psychological services. I'm tired of hearing things like "I'm bipolar, so I can't be a psychiatrist.". Uh, yes you can.


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Chloe33
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08 Feb 2013, 2:18 pm

I think it's awesome when people who have diagnosis get work in psychology, as they know firsthand and can identify and understand a lot of times better than someone who has never had a diagnosis and is a typical "normal".
Folks with diagnosis usually make excellent therapists!



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08 Feb 2013, 2:19 pm

I really don't know, depends on if you want to be a therapist or just research psychology. If one of your special interests is what makes the human brain tick then that would help, but if you became a therapist you'd have to show empathy and be caring and supportive (or at least learn how to pretend to, anyway). Patients might have really severe or scary problems that might really stress you out if you have bad anxiety, they might have been through some horrible experience or be severely depressed or suicidal. I know you have to emotionally detach yourself to a certain degree, which I know I could never really do.



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08 Feb 2013, 2:44 pm

I've been wondering the same thing, as I am considering studying for a psychology degree. The only person I have heard of by name who has taken steps to achieve this, is a young man called Joshua Muggleton, who is studying to become a clinical psychologist, at St. Andrews University, Scotland.

I suggested the idea that I might like to work in this field to my OT for the first time, today, and she didn't say anything particularly negative.

Sorry I don't have much information, just thought i'd let you know.



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08 Feb 2013, 3:00 pm

The non-autistic psychology is different from ours. I think we'd make bad psychologists (but still better than 99.99% of the psychologists out there).

In some aspects we're better suited to analyze, because we have no pre-conceptions and see things from an outside perspective. As a therapist, I think it'd be hard for us to grasp how to help, as the language (non-verbal) is very different.


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LovingTheAlien
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08 Feb 2013, 4:20 pm

Although the fields of medicine, psychology and the like are terribly interesting, it is part of the deal that you will have to deal with people and their emotions all day , every day, until you retire. You will have to consider thoroughly if you will be able to deal with that in the long run. Otherwise, you might feel more comfortable in research of some kind.



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10 Feb 2013, 3:54 am

We'd darn well better be able to, seeing as that's the degree I'm working toward and the only thing I want to do with my life. Admittedly the idea of being a therapist and interacting with people sounds hard, but I've decided I want to go into research psychology regarding autism spectrum disorders, and area I will be particularly suited for. I see no reason why someone with autism can't go into psychology.


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10 Feb 2013, 7:03 am

As long as aspies only practise psychopathy with leeches attached
ADHDers must have their crank beforehand

Imagine if we were cops.
Most of the psychologists I've met seemed to have a disorder or two so it should be fine really



Rascal77s
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10 Feb 2013, 7:07 am

Surfman wrote:
Imagine if we were cops.


It's amazing how many cops have AsPD.



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10 Feb 2013, 2:38 pm

Rascal77s wrote:
Surfman wrote:
Imagine if we were cops.


It's amazing how many cops have AsPD.


Must be super high functioning though.
I've not seen it to a large degree amongst Auckland police. The ones that slip thru the system [heheheheheh] are invariably the ones that tend to leave due to stress and police culture not really supporting an autistic expression in the workplace

I'd say in background work like profiling and detective work, FBI and CIA type stuff we could out perform NT's, but confronting an armed NT during an offence is not a strong area for someone with an ASD

The new sciences are like mythologies, full of emotional clap trap, at times non-factual and religion-like in so many ways



Kaleido
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10 Feb 2013, 3:37 pm

Definitely

The lady that diagnosed me has an autistic difference.



Surfman
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10 Feb 2013, 8:03 pm

nice kitty cat
a bit scary though



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10 Feb 2013, 10:47 pm

Quote:
It's amazing how many cops have AsPD.


Quote:
Must be super high functioning though.
I've not seen it to a large degree amongst Auckland police. The ones that slip thru the system [heheheheheh] are invariably the ones that tend to leave due to stress and police culture not really supporting an autistic expression in the workplace


AsPD is not an autism spectrum condition. It's an acronym for Antisocial Personality Disorder. Which I'm sure is present in a few cops, but far more common in those they arrest (near-universal, in fact).



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11 Feb 2013, 12:25 am

You generally have to be free of any major mental disorder to practice psychology/psychiatry last I heard.