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Kraichgauer
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04 Sep 2019, 4:23 pm

The Doom That Came To Sarnath And Other Stories, by H.P. Lovecraft.

An anthology of Lovecraft's lesser known works which I'm not only currently rereading, but which was the very first Lovecraft book I ever owned.


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HighLlama
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04 Sep 2019, 4:47 pm

Kraichgauer wrote:
The Doom That Came To Sarnath And Other Stories, by H.P. Lovecraft.

An anthology of Lovecraft's lesser known works which I'm not only currently rereading, but which was the very first Lovecraft book I ever owned.


His work is so much fun to revisit. I have The Best of H. P. Lovecraft: Bloodcurdling Tales of Horror and the Macabre (my first) and Tales by the Library of America.


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Kraichgauer
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04 Sep 2019, 5:02 pm

HighLlama wrote:
Kraichgauer wrote:
The Doom That Came To Sarnath And Other Stories, by H.P. Lovecraft.

An anthology of Lovecraft's lesser known works which I'm not only currently rereading, but which was the very first Lovecraft book I ever owned.


His work is so much fun to revisit. I have The Best of H. P. Lovecraft: Bloodcurdling Tales of Horror and the Macabre (my first) and Tales by the Library of America.


:thumleft:


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cathylynn
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04 Sep 2019, 5:23 pm

the case against free speech by p. e. moskowitz - well-researched, readable, scary.



MamaFrankie5259
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07 Sep 2019, 10:32 am

'As I Am', the autobiography of Abba musician Agnetha Faltskog.


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Laeril
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12 Sep 2019, 2:19 pm

Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways To Cure Everything by Lydia Kang, MD and Nate Pedersen. Informative, shocking (blowing smoke up ones butt was a legit medical practice at one point), and always entertaining. Just started the chapter on bloodletting.


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martianprincess
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12 Sep 2019, 2:21 pm

Laeril wrote:
Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways To Cure Everything by Lydia Kang, MD and Nate Pedersen. Informative, shocking (blowing smoke up ones butt was a legit medical practice at one point), and always entertaining. Just started the chapter on bloodletting.


I LOVE this book!! I'll tell anything with a pulse to read it. It's definitely one of my very favorite books!
Since you're enjoying it I also recommend a book called Unmentionables: a Victorian Lady's Guide to Sex, Marriage, and Manners, by Therese O'neill. Equally funny and easy to read.


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Kraichgauer
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12 Sep 2019, 4:32 pm

Hot Water Music, by Charles Bukowski.

Funny, if not irreverent, short fiction by one of my favorite authors about art, sex, alcohol, and joblessness.


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martianprincess
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12 Sep 2019, 4:35 pm

Kraichgauer wrote:
Hot Water Music, by Charles Bukowski.

Funny, if not irreverent, short fiction by one of my favorite authors about art, sex, alcohol, and joblessness.


A rather good choice if I do say so myself.


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Kraichgauer
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12 Sep 2019, 5:11 pm

martianprincess wrote:
Kraichgauer wrote:
Hot Water Music, by Charles Bukowski.

Funny, if not irreverent, short fiction by one of my favorite authors about art, sex, alcohol, and joblessness.


A rather good choice if I do say so myself.


Danke!


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KikiKitty678
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16 Sep 2019, 11:31 am

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a **** by Mark Manson



IsabellaLinton
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18 Sep 2019, 11:48 am

Image

I first read it in 1991, but it remains one of the most beautiful stories I know.

From Wikipedia:
Possession is a 1990 best-selling novel by British writer A. S. Byatt that won the 1990 Booker Prize. The novel explores the postmodern concerns of similar novels, which are often categorised as historiographic metafiction, a genre that blends approaches from both historical fiction and metafiction.

The novel follows two modern-day literary academics as they research the previously unknown love affair between famous fictional poets Randolph Henry Ash and Christabel LaMotte. Possession is set both in the present day and the Victorian era, contrasting the two time periods, as well as echoing similarities and satirising modern academia and mating rituals. The structure of the novel incorporates many different styles, including fictional diary entries, letters and poetry, and uses these styles and other devices to explore the postmodern concerns of the authority of textual narratives. The title Possession highlights many of the major themes in the novel: questions of ownership and independence between lovers, the practice of collecting historically significant cultural artefacts, and the possession that biographers feel toward their subjects.



HighLlama
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19 Sep 2019, 5:08 pm

Get Shorty by Elmore Leonard
Critique of Pure Reason by Immanuel Kant.

Also just finished J.G. Ballard's Concrete Island and Beyond Good and Evil by Frederich Nietzsche.


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HighLlama
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24 Sep 2019, 4:35 am

A Dead Man in Deptford by Anthony Burgess


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martianprincess
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24 Sep 2019, 8:22 am

IsabellaLinton wrote:
Image

I first read it in 1991, but it remains one of the most beautiful stories I know.

From Wikipedia:
Possession is a 1990 best-selling novel by British writer A. S. Byatt that won the 1990 Booker Prize. The novel explores the postmodern concerns of similar novels, which are often categorised as historiographic metafiction, a genre that blends approaches from both historical fiction and metafiction.

The novel follows two modern-day literary academics as they research the previously unknown love affair between famous fictional poets Randolph Henry Ash and Christabel LaMotte. Possession is set both in the present day and the Victorian era, contrasting the two time periods, as well as echoing similarities and satirising modern academia and mating rituals. The structure of the novel incorporates many different styles, including fictional diary entries, letters and poetry, and uses these styles and other devices to explore the postmodern concerns of the authority of textual narratives. The title Possession highlights many of the major themes in the novel: questions of ownership and independence between lovers, the practice of collecting historically significant cultural artefacts, and the possession that biographers feel toward their subjects.


I started this book a few days ago because of this post - I'm absolutely loving it. Thanks!


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I don't even really like horses
I like wild orchids and neighbors with wide orbits