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IsabellaLinton
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19 May 2020, 10:06 am

I'm reading an account of Anne Askew, from Foxe's Book of Martyrs. The tome is a work of Protestant history and martyrology by Protestant English historian John Foxe, first published in 1563. It includes an account of the sufferings of Protestants under the Catholic Church, with particular emphasis on England and Scotland.

I'm comparing Foxe's account with Charlotte Brontë's 1842 French devoir entitled "Anne Askew", which was written in response to Chateaubriand's "Eudore" from Les Martyrs, 1809.

If any theologians or historians can tell me more about Anne Askew's life and martyrdom, please contribute.

Anne Askew (1521-1546)
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BenderRodriguez
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19 May 2020, 11:50 am

I wanted to re-read Joseph Frank's opus about Dostoevsky and since I couldn't find my old one, I got impulsive and bought another. 5 volumes weighing 5kg of 2500 fascinating pages will keep me happy and busy for a while.


I'll leave this note here, just in case: if Prometheus18 ever decides to come back, or if he's still reading, I'll go out of my way to find my old set and send it to him if he wants - he's one of the rare people I've met who really wanted to read the whole thing and would appreciate it!


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Karamazov
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08 Jun 2020, 10:02 am

The Story of the Jews, Finding the Words: 1000BCE -1492CE, Simon Schama.



VegetableMan
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08 Jun 2020, 10:43 am

'Inside Out: A Personal History Of Pink Floyd' by Nick Mason.


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AnonymousAnonymous
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09 Jun 2020, 2:00 pm

Franz Kafka's masterpiece The Metamorphosis again!


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sorrowfairiewhisper
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11 Jun 2020, 4:40 pm

Currently reading .The trouble with goats and sheep by Joanna Cannon



IsabellaLinton
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11 Jun 2020, 5:32 pm

Anne Brontë: 200 Artists, 200 Pages

I'm enjoying this stunning collection of mixed media and textile art, created to interpret major themes in Anne Brontë's writing. It was commissioned to celebrate her bicentenary year as the first sustained, feminist novelist in English literature.

The book is an incredible sensory experience. It even smells good. :heart:

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https://www.bronte.org.uk/bronte-shop/c ... -200-pages

http://lindseytyson.com/annebronte200/a ... wn%20words.

Rest in Peace Anne
(1820 - 1849)



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15 Jun 2020, 5:39 pm

"Light of the stars" by Adam Frank



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16 Jun 2020, 3:56 pm

An ebook version (with audio included) of Naked Lunch: The Restored Text by William S. Burroughs.


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Kraichgauer
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19 Jun 2020, 4:58 pm

The Year's Best Horror Vol. 5: Going Global.

Anthology of the newest horror fiction judged to be the best of the year, this time with an international set of authors. Kinda hit and miss in my honest opinion.


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19 Jun 2020, 4:59 pm

AnonymousAnonymous wrote:
An ebook version (with audio included) of Naked Lunch: The Restored Text by William S. Burroughs.


:thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:


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19 Jun 2020, 5:00 pm

AnonymousAnonymous wrote:
Franz Kafka's masterpiece The Metamorphosis again!


:thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft: :thumleft:


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Karamazov
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20 Jun 2020, 2:28 am

The World Treasury of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics Timothy Ferris (Ed).



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20 Jun 2020, 2:37 pm

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Steve Donoghue January 16, 2018 wrote:
Given his penchant for historical fiction and his freakish productivity – this is his 54th novel – it was only a matter of time until bestselling writer Bernard Cornwell got around to Shakespeare, and in his new book Fools and Mortals, he does just that … but it's not playwright William but his younger brother Richard who's the star of the story.

"Fools and Mortals" stars Richard as a struggling actor, better-looking than his older brother but feeling thwarted in his profession. He's sick of playing the parts of girls and young women in the plays of his brother and others; now that he's older and his voice has changed, he's hoping to start playing men on stage for the Lord Chamberlain's Men. He's poor and impecunious, rash and not particularly scrupulous, and any professional advantage he might have enjoyed because of his brother's success is countered by Cornwell's stroke of genius here: in "Fools and Mortals," William Shakespeare is the Jerk of Avon.

He thinks of Richard, with some justification, as a strutting, whining fool, but even allowing for sibling rivalry, William isn't exactly overflowing with the milk of human kindness himself; he's curt, impatient, enigmatic, and short-tempered, an egotistical prig shielding behind his prodigious writing talent – think Steve Jobs in a neck-ruff. There've been countless novels about Shakespeare, and in most of them, he's a honey-worded paragon. Even in the more human renditions (including, for instance, John Mortimer's excellent 1977 novel "Will Shakespeare"), he's at least paragon-ish. Not so in "Fools and Mortals": this is a Shakespeare who's often cruel but never kind.

At least he's not weak-natured, which can't be said of his brother. Richard is positively awash in human weaknesses, and when a nobleman named Christopher deValle offers him money to steal the manuscript of his brother's newest play, he's tempted: “I had a choice. I could accept deValle's gold and betray my brother. I could steal A Midsummer Night's Dream, and even, perhaps, the new play he was writing that was set in Verona. I would be rich!”

Cornwell confidently complicates that simple plot in a handful of ways. He introduces the scheming, conflicted nobility of Shakespeare's world in a small group of lords and ladies who feature in the book's main subplot, including the lord and lady who control the destiny of the acting company, Lady Anne Hunsdon and her husband (“We were Lord Hunsdon's pets, we played at his pleasure, and groveled when he deigned to notice us”). Elizabethan England was broiling with religious tensions that redound to the theatrical world. Backstage at the theater, William shows Richard a copy of an incendiary pamphlet called A Conference About the Next Succession to the Crowne of Ingland (“it suggests that we, the people of England, have the right to chose our own monarch”). Cornwell has had a vast amount of experience at working his exposition smoothly into his narrative, and all that experience pays off in "Fools and Mortals": as in all the best historical fiction, readers will come away with a seminar's-worth of historical knowledge without feeling like they did any heavy lifting.

By far the most successful example of this is, predictably, Cornwell's evocation of the Elizabethan theatrical world. That world is far better illuminated from the perspective of a semi-competent unknown striver like Richard than it might have been if seen from the viewpoint of his more successful brother or any of the other luminaries of the Lord Chamberlain's Men. Through Richard's experiences, Cornwell shows readers the whole of that long-gone theatrical world – the jobbing of plays, the scrambling for venues and parts and funding, the fierce interplay of personalities, and the practicalities of stagecraft, from the refinement of special effects to the technicalities of the paying customers to the details of how an actor prepares: “I washed with a damp cloth, then cleaned my teeth, rubbing the cuttlefish bone paste so hard that my gums bled.”

Cornwell's Historical Note follows up on quite a bit of these subjects and takes swipes at others as well (the evergreen Shakespearean authorship question, for instance, is dismissed as “nonsense”) – and passes over some others in baffling silence. Surely the first question readers are going to have when picking up "Fools and Mortals" is, did William Shakespeare really have a brother named Richard, and was he really an actor in Shakespeare's company? The answers? There was indeed a Richard Shakespeare, but the best (admittedly sketchy) evidence is that he led a far duller life than the one Cornwell gives him. But then, so did his brother.



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20 Jun 2020, 4:47 pm

^^^
Sounds fascinating!


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22 Jun 2020, 7:46 pm

I'm reading The Name of the Rose in Italian. I already know Spanish, and I'm using the book as a crash course in Italian.