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SteelMaiden
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04 Jun 2013, 2:47 pm

I have an IQ of 160 as recorded by a clinical psychologist. However I don't think my intelligence is evenly spread at all.

I can beat a calculator with my mental arithmetic in certain cases (such as multiplying any two numbers like 78 x 56, or finding out if a number is prime). I got into Cambridge University (although I'm not there now because I hated it there and it made me ill) and even managed to impress the interviewers (apparently). I taught myself how to program in Visual Basic on a computer at the age of 9. Etc etc.

However I cannot follow a cooking recipe. I cannot follow road directions if someone gives them verbally to me. It took 20+ attempts for me to learn how to change bed sheets. I am in supported housing because I struggle to live independently. I cannot handle phone calls. If I were faced with customer services in a shop, or a bank, or the post office, I would not know what to do, and the stress of it would make me walk out immediately. I have to be reminded to do things that others would do naturally. I can't even open a bank account.

Is it possible that my academic genius (sorry if that sounds like narcissism) has "taken over" such a large part of my mental energy that simple tasks such as cooking and posting a parcel are not delegated any energy by my brain and therefore become prohibitively difficult? Is it an unusual distribution in skills?

I have had times in my life where, without effort, I have been able to do calculations such as 563 divided by 4591 in my head in less than a second and beat a calculator in how many decimal places I can produce. However I cannot do this all the time and it is involuntary as to when I am able to do this. Most of the time my mental arithmetic is "highly superior" but not 100% savant level.

I also have multiple neurological and psychiatric conditions, is it possible that all of this, and my AS, and my high IQ is intertwined into one neurodevelopmental difference?


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Thelibrarian
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04 Jun 2013, 3:25 pm

Maiden, I can relate completely. While my IQ isn't 160, it is very high, and has been as much bane as blessing. When it became obvious that I wasn't headed toward Harvard or Yale, my parents became very hateful toward me. Since I am very aspie, and there was no such diagnosis when I was growing up, the only message I got while growing up was that since I wasn't willing to try a little harder to be a decent human being and fit in, that I was lazy and no good, and would soon come to a bad end.

Having said this, my understanding of AS is that it's not a high level of aptitude so much as a mixed profile of aptitudes. For example, I can grasp and explain the most sophisticated philosophical concepts and keep enormous amounts of information in my head and recall it almost on command, yet I struggle with the simplest things such as routine maintenance on my motorized equipment, or making small talk with those around me.

I spend my time and energy concentrating on those things I am good at, and only do the rest when I have to. I'm not sure what else I can do. If you find a solution to our dilemmas, you will have my full and undivided attention.



beige37
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04 Jun 2013, 3:42 pm

I also scored well on my cognitive tests. I was in the superior ranges, and I got a few high averages in some of the subtests. I did not score well on the visual spatial subtest, though. I was pretty weak in that area. I struggle a lot with day to day tasks that other people seem to handle with ease, though. There is definitely a gap there for me, as well. I feel like I would have been more successful if I would have been more "balanced out." The intelligence would be more valuable to me if I could actually use it in school. As of now, my lack of social skills and anxiety get in the way of doing that.

I don't know if they're all related, but I think it can definitely be frustrating and cause some anxiety after a while. I've always felt kind of stuck like this, and I know that causes me a lot of anxiety about my life. I also wonder how common this is...



Thelibrarian
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04 Jun 2013, 3:48 pm

beige37 wrote:
I also scored well on my cognitive tests. I was in the superior ranges, and I got a few high averages in some of the subtests. I did not score well on the visual spatial subtest, though. I was pretty weak in that area. I struggle a lot with day to day tasks that other people seem to handle with ease, though. There is definitely a gap there for me, as well. I feel like I would have been more successful if I would have been more "balanced out." The intelligence would be more valuable to me if I could actually use it in school. As of now, my lack of social skills and anxiety get in the way of doing that.

I don't know if they're all related, but I think it can definitely be frustrating and cause some anxiety after a while. I've always felt kind of stuck like this, and I know that causes me a lot of anxiety about my life. I also wonder how common this is...


How common this kind of thing is? Before I understood AS, I always thought I was uniquely weird and deficient. So, while I don't know how common our types of afflictions are, we're hardly freaks of nature.

Out of curiosity, could you tell me what kind of work you do, or at least what you trained for?



beige37
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04 Jun 2013, 4:31 pm

Thelibrarian wrote:
beige37 wrote:
I also scored well on my cognitive tests. I was in the superior ranges, and I got a few high averages in some of the subtests. I did not score well on the visual spatial subtest, though. I was pretty weak in that area. I struggle a lot with day to day tasks that other people seem to handle with ease, though. There is definitely a gap there for me, as well. I feel like I would have been more successful if I would have been more "balanced out." The intelligence would be more valuable to me if I could actually use it in school. As of now, my lack of social skills and anxiety get in the way of doing that.

I don't know if they're all related, but I think it can definitely be frustrating and cause some anxiety after a while. I've always felt kind of stuck like this, and I know that causes me a lot of anxiety about my life. I also wonder how common this is...


How common this kind of thing is? Before I understood AS, I always thought I was uniquely weird and deficient. So, while I don't know how common our types of afflictions are, we're hardly freaks of nature.

Out of curiosity, could you tell me what kind of work you do, or at least what you trained for?


I'm in high school. I'm seventeen. I'm not currently in school, but I'm working with my district to get into a program for students with Asperger's. As for my career, I would really like to study neuroscience. Neurotechnology is fascinating.



Thelibrarian
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04 Jun 2013, 4:44 pm

beige37 wrote:
Thelibrarian wrote:
beige37 wrote:
I also scored well on my cognitive tests. I was in the superior ranges, and I got a few high averages in some of the subtests. I did not score well on the visual spatial subtest, though. I was pretty weak in that area. I struggle a lot with day to day tasks that other people seem to handle with ease, though. There is definitely a gap there for me, as well. I feel like I would have been more successful if I would have been more "balanced out." The intelligence would be more valuable to me if I could actually use it in school. As of now, my lack of social skills and anxiety get in the way of doing that.

I don't know if they're all related, but I think it can definitely be frustrating and cause some anxiety after a while. I've always felt kind of stuck like this, and I know that causes me a lot of anxiety about my life. I also wonder how common this is...


How common this kind of thing is? Before I understood AS, I always thought I was uniquely weird and deficient. So, while I don't know how common our types of afflictions are, we're hardly freaks of nature.

Out of curiosity, could you tell me what kind of work you do, or at least what you trained for?


I'm in high school. I'm seventeen. I'm not currently in school, but I'm working with my district to get into a program for students with Asperger's. As for my career, I would really like to study neuroscience. Neurotechnology is fascinating.


It sounds to me as if you have a very real advantage. With something like neuroscience, it's a matter of dealing with things rather than people. I say this because the only jobs I ever did well at were those where my dealings with people were minimal, including my current job.

If neuroscience is what you want to do, getting in to some school for your undergrad shouldn't be hard, though it might not be the school you want, unless you have really good grades. But if you acquit yourself well there, then doors will open to better schools for your advanced degrees.

At least this was my experience. I didn't do well in high school. After a stint in the Navy, I went to junior college and made up for it, and never had any problems after that.

Good luck!



Ettina
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04 Jun 2013, 5:04 pm

Quote:
Is it possible that my academic genius (sorry if that sounds like narcissism) has "taken over" such a large part of my mental energy that simple tasks such as cooking and posting a parcel are not delegated any energy by my brain and therefore become prohibitively difficult? Is it an unusual distribution in skills?


Not in my experience. Plenty of geniuses do fine with the mundane stuff two.

However, your signature lists two different diagnoses associated with sucky executive functions, so it's no surprise you have trouble with that stuff.



beige37
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04 Jun 2013, 5:06 pm

Thelibrarian wrote:
beige37 wrote:
Thelibrarian wrote:
beige37 wrote:
I also scored well on my cognitive tests. I was in the superior ranges, and I got a few high averages in some of the subtests. I did not score well on the visual spatial subtest, though. I was pretty weak in that area. I struggle a lot with day to day tasks that other people seem to handle with ease, though. There is definitely a gap there for me, as well. I feel like I would have been more successful if I would have been more "balanced out." The intelligence would be more valuable to me if I could actually use it in school. As of now, my lack of social skills and anxiety get in the way of doing that.

I don't know if they're all related, but I think it can definitely be frustrating and cause some anxiety after a while. I've always felt kind of stuck like this, and I know that causes me a lot of anxiety about my life. I also wonder how common this is...


How common this kind of thing is? Before I understood AS, I always thought I was uniquely weird and deficient. So, while I don't know how common our types of afflictions are, we're hardly freaks of nature.

Out of curiosity, could you tell me what kind of work you do, or at least what you trained for?


I'm in high school. I'm seventeen. I'm not currently in school, but I'm working with my district to get into a program for students with Asperger's. As for my career, I would really like to study neuroscience. Neurotechnology is fascinating.


It sounds to me as if you have a very real advantage. With something like neuroscience, it's a matter of dealing with things rather than people. I say this because the only jobs I ever did well at were those where my dealings with people were minimal, including my current job.

If neuroscience is what you want to do, getting in to some school for your undergrad shouldn't be hard, though it might not be the school you want, unless you have really good grades. But if you acquit yourself well there, then doors will open to better schools for your advanced degrees.

At least this was my experience. I didn't do well in high school. After a stint in the Navy, I went to junior college and made up for it, and never had any problems after that.

Good luck!


Working in a field like neuroscience and getting to do something I'm so passionate about would be great. It would be awful working at a cubical all day or having to work with lots of customers or coworkers =/.

As far as college, my grades are good, and I definitely need to start looking at those different options.



Rooster1968
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04 Jun 2013, 5:09 pm

This all sounds very familiar to me. My grasp of some things is almost instantaneous and my retention (collection!) of facts on a very diverse range of topics is very large. I have never held onto an interest in any one thing for long enough to become truly expert yet I am often thought of as being so in some areas by others. I am not sure what my IQ is, never having been formally tested, but the indicators are that it is very high - but only in the classical sense. I once described myself as the type of person who can explain the Latin/Greek (etc) root of a word but gets lost on the way to the shops.
What the OP said about being unable to follow recipies etc is something I am all-too familiar with. My flat got quite untidy last week but my two teenage sons were coming for the weekend and my girlfriend was coming over on Friday night. I found myself pacing from room to room, gazing at the chaos, fervently hoping for inspiration, finding none, pace more etc etc etc until I burst out crying like a fool, ashamed of my inability to co-ordinate something as "simple" as cleaning up my house.
So, sometimes I feel really, really smart and sometimes I feel really, really dumb. The upshot is usually that other people see me as not trying or being lazy when it's something I suck at, which, unfortunately, tends to be tasks regarded by many as menial. When I point this out, and suggest where I may be better placed to be more productive, they tell me that nobody likes doing these things so I should suck it up and stop being lazy. They confuse/conflate job satisfaction and proficiency.
Finally, to further complicate matters, as the OP suggested, I too have fluctuations in my ability to perform whether it be in areas I am strong or weak in. Sometimes I forget how to spell something simple (usually because of overthinking) yet at other times I can fly through domestic chores like Mary Poppins! (usually because I thought less about it) but the norm is for me to be better at tasks that require classical "intellect" as opposed to organisational skills or theory of mind.
Aspies, huh? Go figure ;)
Edit: As far as careers go, I managed a successful career for many years in luxury automotive retail. I was able to do this for the same reasons I didn't get diagnosed until 44- one of my lifelong "special interests" has been people - how they think, interact, the reasons behind different sorts of behaviour. I have always (as long as I can remember) been aware of focusing on any conflict I saw in TV/film drama/soaps/sitcoms etc. I also read lots of books on philosophy (the ethos was less important than the thought processes so I found gold in such diverse characters as Nietszche, Voltaire and Plato) and I studied psychology to degree level (never completed...sigh) So, with that background, a decent intellect and a product that was the best of its type (so I didn't have to fundamentally lie) I was able to construct a personality and a series of "scripts" that made me very successful. Then they changed things so that instead of requiring a pen and a cigarette box to do the finance sums on you needed to fill in endless forms, use ever changing (crappy) bespoke software that was a study in BIBO (Bullshit in/bullshit out) management-time justification and all sorts of other things which were non-functional and bloody confusing! I had to quit after one meltdown too many but I reckon I could do it again if they cut out the dead wood and let me do the core job.
I may have rambled - if so, apologies. :)



androbot2084
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04 Jun 2013, 5:50 pm

I cannot follow driving directions. I used to buy road maps and now I use a navigator so I can feel smart.



Thelibrarian
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04 Jun 2013, 6:04 pm

Working in a field like neuroscience and getting to do something I'm so passionate about would be great. It would be awful working at a cubical all day or having to work with lots of customers or coworkers =/.

Beige, as you find out more about your chosen profession, you likely can determine your work environment, at least to some extent. I would imagine that a lot of neuroscientists work in labs, and have a staff working for them, which would get you out of a cubicle and office politics and such. Being a boss myself, I can assure you that once you're in charge that part of the job description for your underlings will be able to get along with you, which would make things much easier. Your superiors would expect you to concentrate solely on your work, and if you do that they won't care about people skills so much.

I'd say you've chosen well indeed.



beige37
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04 Jun 2013, 6:21 pm

And, I'd take a lab over a cubical any day =D.



chris5000
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04 Jun 2013, 7:06 pm

the last iq test I took was when I was 10 or 11 I got a 101

I seem to be genus about my special interest but they have been shifting over the last few years
when I was in high school up until the end of my senior year it was IT, I even placed 5th in state for the business professionals of Americas pc troubleshooting competition. no one told me I was allowed to use books during the test so I never marked pages or anything like all the other people did, my friend got 2nd and went to nationals I think he might of had aspergers too but we never talked about it. I remember him having an IEP at the time I did not think much of it



LupaLuna
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05 Jun 2013, 12:36 pm

The last time I got my IQ test was over 20 years ago and I was at 154. I wonder if its has changed at all now that i am older.


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Zodai
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05 Jun 2013, 12:56 pm

I'm a high school student planning to be an author, and my English teacher calls me a savant on numerous occasions.

I don't know how to tie my shoes, the thought of doing dishes makes me a little ill, and I like to spin around in a chair for hours on end.

I think we can all relate :lol:


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