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kx250rider
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31 Jul 2013, 10:50 am

auntblabby wrote:
^^^
that sounds horrifying!


Yes! I have refused anesthetic for this reason, and for the reason that I had a very bad reaction to "sedative" or twilight anesthetic when I was 10 years old. Since then, I have had surgery (an abdominal procedure, misc. injury repairs, and my vasectomy) without any anesthetic or sedatives, or even any narcotic pain pills. Only local numbing shots. The thought of a mind-altering drug to induce a fake sleep is far scarier to me, than feeling a knife cutting me, or most any other inflicted physical pain.

As far as the OP's question, I think pain is perceived differently by us with autism. I passed a kidney stone, and that's supposed to be cripplingly painful, and it indeed was painful, but not what others describe, and not what the doctor said it should have felt like. I don't really feel much difference between an injection and a tap on the shoulder, and honestly I'd rather be stung by a bee than have someone touch me on the back when I don't see it coming. Another example is that when I broke my middle finger (compound fracture with bone sticking out through the skin), It hurt, but I rolled paper towels around my hand, and finished what I was doing anyway, and then drove into the city to the hospital. The ER doctor didn't believe me that I could finish working on something, then drive 40 miles in that condition (broken bone exposed to the air), but that's how it was.

Charles



auntblabby
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31 Jul 2013, 3:54 pm

^^^
you're TOUGH! :o



auntblabby
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31 Jul 2013, 3:57 pm

do people who have a muted sense of pain also have a muted sense of pleasure? in other words, is the dynamic range of pleasure-pain shallower in the stoic types?



LKL
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01 Aug 2013, 12:35 am

kx250rider wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
^^^
that sounds horrifying!


Yes! I have refused anesthetic for this reason, and for the reason that I had a very bad reaction to "sedative" or twilight anesthetic when I was 10 years old. Since then, I have had surgery (an abdominal procedure, misc. injury repairs, and my vasectomy) without any anesthetic or sedatives, or even any narcotic pain pills. Only local numbing shots. The thought of a mind-altering drug to induce a fake sleep is far scarier to me, than feeling a knife cutting me, or most any other inflicted physical pain.

As far as the OP's question, I think pain is perceived differently by us with autism. I passed a kidney stone, and that's supposed to be cripplingly painful, and it indeed was painful, but not what others describe, and not what the doctor said it should have felt like. I don't really feel much difference between an injection and a tap on the shoulder, and honestly I'd rather be stung by a bee than have someone touch me on the back when I don't see it coming. Another example is that when I broke my middle finger (compound fracture with bone sticking out through the skin), It hurt, but I rolled paper towels around my hand, and finished what I was doing anyway, and then drove into the city to the hospital. The ER doctor didn't believe me that I could finish working on something, then drive 40 miles in that condition (broken bone exposed to the air), but that's how it was.

Charles

I'm terrified of general anesthesia, too, but the one time I've undergone it the surgeon refused to touch me unless I consented to a general. I asked (several times) about alternatives, but it was a no-go.