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LupaLuna
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04 Oct 2013, 1:52 pm

In the UK and Australia. Its pronounced ua-sper-gers . Here in America we say "Ass-Burgers"



ASPartOfMe
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04 Oct 2013, 1:53 pm

I just amazes me that seemingly in every youtube video about asprgers a commentator thinks he or she has come up with this brand new witty idea when they write ASS burgers.

Unless it is scientifically proven that Hans Asperger, Lorna Wing and every body that has diagnosed Aspergers since then have been wrong or my diagnoses is changed by a specialist I am not going to change the name of part of my identity because of trolls. I am both Aspie and Autistic because Aspergers is part of the autism spectrum. I am a Long Islander and an American because Long Island is in America. Nobody proposes that I do not call myself a Long Islander because people make fun of it by saying LongGuylender


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Last edited by ASPartOfMe on 04 Oct 2013, 4:46 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Raziel
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04 Oct 2013, 1:55 pm

Delphiki wrote:
http://www.merriam-webster.com/audio.php?file=asper02m&word=Asperger%27s%20syndrome&text=\%3Cspan%20class%3D%22unicode%22%3E%CB%88%3C%2Fspan%3E%C3%A4s-%3Cspan%20class%3D%22unicode%22%3E%CB%8C%3C%2Fspan%3Ep%C9%99r-g%C9%99rz-\


That's very close to the original German pronounciation.


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Codyrules37
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04 Oct 2013, 2:01 pm

I have Bootyburgers (boo te bur grrs)



LupaLuna
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04 Oct 2013, 2:06 pm

retep wrote:
As you probably already know, AS is named for Hans Asperger (an Austrian pediatrician). The Austrians pronounce the "ger" part of his name with a hard G (as in; great, gate and growl). It is not pronounced as a soft G (ie; geriatric, generator, or giant).


Got to love the English language. why the soft "G" . Can't they just use "J" instead and spell those words like (ie; jeriatric, jenerator, or jiant).



Homesickalien80
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04 Oct 2013, 3:36 pm

I pronounce it with the soft 'g'. I've thought about this before, usually after reading the 'ASS burgers' comments on you tube from the comically inept. It is such an obvious gag that it deserves nothing but a large yawn. Anyway the pronouncination thing, there are other words out there with the same final syllables, which are pronounced with soft gees.. merger, ledger, hedge, wedger? :? So I thougt it logical asperger's should follow suit. It's semantics really though and I know I wouldn't have even thought about this at all were it not for being a bit miffed that it sounded like an arse-meat based snack, like the other poster said, as if people on the spectrum don't have enough shite to contend with.



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04 Oct 2013, 4:39 pm

Ass burgers. :oops: :lol: :lol:



BigSister
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04 Oct 2013, 6:28 pm

Thanks so much for all the replies, everyone! I think I get it now - it sounds like we kind of all have different regionally accepted pronunciations. That said, consensus does seem to imply that I should keep my hard 'g' and switch the b to a p. I'll try to pronounce it as p (perger) instead of b (burger) now. No offense meant with my original pronunciation, of course - it's just how I grew up hearing it pronounced as a kid, and I assumed that was the right way. It's going to be really hard to break the habit of pronouncing it with a b - it's been ingrained in me for over a decade! But I'm sure I'll figure it out.


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retep
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05 Oct 2013, 3:18 am

AdamAutistic wrote:
i call it "hineyburgers"

Cute. (NOT)


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retep
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05 Oct 2013, 4:09 am

BigSister wrote:
Thanks so much for all the replies, everyone! I think I get it now - it sounds like we kind of all have different regionally accepted pronunciations. That said, consensus does seem to imply that I should keep my hard 'g' and switch the b to a p. I'll try to pronounce it as p (perger) instead of b (burger) now. No offense meant with my original pronunciation, of course - it's just how I grew up hearing it pronounced as a kid, and I assumed that was the right way. It's going to be really hard to break the habit of pronouncing it with a b - it's been ingrained in me for over a decade! But I'm sure I'll figure it out.


Another way that might make it easier for you to pronounce Mr. A's name in 'American' is to think of it as ASPERger (with a hard g, of course!)

Or better yet, just refer to it as A.S.and see how many people nod their heads knowingly... all the while giving you that blank stare of total bewilderment. :lol:

Never mind how other 'english' speakers massacre our language. My Granny was from England before she emigrated to Canader. She used to call me Petaw, but my name is Peter. Let's see... she couldn't pronounce the 'r' in my name, but she couldn't NOT pronounce a nonexistent 'r' when she named the country where she lived for over three quarters of her 98 years. I'm inclined to take the 'jer' suggestion with a grain of salt.


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naturalplastic
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05 Oct 2013, 7:10 am

Its named after Dr. Hans Asperger.

Dr. Hans Asperger himself (or his family line) was named after the word "asperger".

An 'asperger" is someone who 'aspergs"- which is to do the ritual of sprinkling holy water in a Catholic church.

In English the word for a person who aspergs is pronounced with a soft 'g' (the J sound) like 'general' , and (ironically) like the word "German". In the English speaking world you 'asperJ' in a catholic church, not 'asperG'.

However since Austrians speak German there is no soft G. So it ryhmes with "hamburgers" ( whether youre talking about the person who does the ritual, or the person with the condition).

In his native Austria, and in Germany, they would only say it with the hard G sound.

But in English either way is acceptable- soft G, or hard G. Even though it sounds wrong-as-hell to my ears you can make the case that "asperJers" is an acceptalble anglicization- because they guy its named after was himself named after an occupation that is pronounced with the J sound in English.


It probably really should be pronounced "Oss- pergers".
But on the rare occasions when I actually utter the word- I do tend to say it the wrong american way of "ASS-burgers" because I used to assume that the good doctor was named after some ancestrial village named "Asburg". But my research (a few seconds on google) lead to the right origin of his name in the word for the catholic ritual.



Last edited by naturalplastic on 05 Oct 2013, 10:08 am, edited 2 times in total.

Ann2011
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05 Oct 2013, 10:02 am

jrjones9933 wrote:
I just say Autism, and I wish that the term Asperger's would die already. I see no reason to segregate myself from people elsewhere on the Autism Spectrum. I've said it before, but someone at that meeting should have stood up and said: "Wait a minute, are you seriously suggesting that we take a bunch of kids with social developmental difficulties and give them the label ass-burgers? Sorry, Hans, but no, just no."


I say I'm autistic or have autism spectrum disorder.



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05 Oct 2013, 11:11 am

I wouldn't know, as I never say the word. A lot of British people pronounce it the cringing way, making the ''G'' sound like ''J''. I'd rather people say it like this: ''Azberger's''.


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Codyrules37
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05 Oct 2013, 11:17 am

I have buttboogers



jk1
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05 Oct 2013, 3:02 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
Its named after Dr. Hans Asperger.

Dr. Hans Asperger himself (or his family line) was named after the word "asperger".

An 'asperger" is someone who 'aspergs"- which is to do the ritual of sprinkling holy water in a Catholic church.

In English the word for a person who aspergs is pronounced with a soft 'g' (the J sound) like 'general' , and (ironically) like the word "German". In the English speaking world you 'asperJ' in a catholic church, not 'asperG'.

However since Austrians speak German there is no soft G. So it ryhmes with "hamburgers" ( whether youre talking about the person who does the ritual, or the person with the condition).

In his native Austria, and in Germany, they would only say it with the hard G sound.

But in English either way is acceptable- soft G, or hard G. Even though it sounds wrong-as-hell to my ears you can make the case that "asperJers" is an acceptalble anglicization- because they guy its named after was himself named after an occupation that is pronounced with the J sound in English.


It probably really should be pronounced "Oss- pergers".
But on the rare occasions when I actually utter the word- I do tend to say it the wrong american way of "ASS-burgers" because I used to assume that the good doctor was named after some ancestrial village named "Asburg". But my research (a few seconds on google) lead to the right origin of his name in the word for the catholic ritual.


Thanks, naturalplastic. That's an interesting story. It kind of gives reasons for both G being pronounced hard and soft.

Is P meant to be pronounced as B? As I said earlier, P and B sound totally different to me. So there is no way perger and burger can be mixed up. Why do people talk about burger when they talk about Asperger?

I wonder who has the authority to decide how a word should be pronounced. Is it the Queen? We all seem to be pronouncing Asperger in whichever way we like. I guess that's the problem with the English language that doesn't have fully systematic phonographic rules.