Page 1 of 1 [ 12 posts ] 

staremaster
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Dec 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,726
Location: New York

05 Nov 2013, 9:29 pm

Apple_in_my_Eye
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 7 May 2008
Age: 50
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,527
Location: in my brain

06 Nov 2013, 12:50 am

If mass murderers are usually mentally unbalanced then they'll probably be on some psychotropic drugs. So, IMO, the problem is the usual "correlation doesn't necessarily mean causation."

I noticed the entry for Hinkley -- he likely took the valium to calm himself after he decided to try to kill Reagan. The two bank robbers in the L.A. North Hollywood shootout took phenobarbital likely for the same reason.

The article also misspells "amitriptyline."



heavenlyabyss
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 Sep 2011
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,393

06 Nov 2013, 4:44 am

I believe there is a correlation. The most common correlation to violence is street drugs, but some people do have bad reactions to prescribed antidepressants and antipsychotics. Drug manufacturers who say otherwise are in all likelihood lying and well are of their lies. I don't have proof, this is just what I believe.



pete1061
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Nov 2011
Age: 49
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,766
Location: Portland, OR

06 Nov 2013, 8:29 am

There is so much corruption and turnaround between the FDA & pharmaceutical industry it's hard to trust the effectiveness of psychotropic drugs. So many of them are poorly tested and grossly over prescribed.
So, yes there definitely could be a correlation.


_________________
Your Aspie score: 172 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 35 of 200
You are very likely an Aspie
Diagnosed in 2005


zer0netgain
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Mar 2009
Age: 51
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,784

06 Nov 2013, 9:15 am

Most of these drugs are basically PCP-variants. For many, they may work, but they have known side effects of making the patient much worse.

Under the influence of a PCP-type drug, the ability to distinguish between reality and dreaming becomes blurred. People with violent tendencies or fantasies can act them out in real life all the time thinking it's not really happening.

They are prescribed way too readily and not enough medical supervision is applied to those on the drugs to watch out for these known side effects.

It's the same way there's a lot of drugs for depression, and a known side effect is that they can make the patient worse and lead to suicide. Sounds like the drug should only be prescribed in the worst of cases, not as a way for anyone with depression to try and cope.



staremaster
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Dec 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,726
Location: New York

06 Nov 2013, 3:31 pm

zer0netgain wrote:
They are prescribed way too readily and not enough medical supervision is applied to those on the drugs to watch out for these known side effects.

It's the same way there's a lot of drugs for depression, and a known side effect is that they can make the patient worse and lead to suicide. Sounds like the drug should only be prescribed in the worst of cases, not as a way for anyone with depression to try and cope.


Absolutely. The patient is told to inform their doctor about negative side effects they may be experiencing, but is also told that there is an adjustment period of discomfort before the effects of the medication can be accurately assessed.
Most psychiatrists would have no issue prescribing amphetamines for depression or ADHD, and then prescribing a "sleep aid" to help the patient sleep through the night.



Misslizard
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 18 Jun 2012
Age: 55
Gender: Female
Posts: 13,895
Location: Aux Arcs

06 Nov 2013, 4:23 pm

Maybe.But look at the lives that anti-depressants have saved.


_________________
"Security is mostly a superstition.It does not exist in nature,nor do the children of men as a whole experience it.Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure.Life is either a daring adventure,or nothing." Helen Keller


staremaster
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Dec 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,726
Location: New York

06 Nov 2013, 6:46 pm

Misslizard wrote:
Maybe.But look at the lives that anti-depressants have saved.

People say that about guns, too. But it takes longer to get a legal pistol than it does to get a prescription for anti-depressants/anti-psychotics...



visagrunt
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 16 Oct 2009
Age: 52
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,128
Location: Vancouver, BC

06 Nov 2013, 8:54 pm

By that logic, breathing and digestion are also linked to violent behavior. :roll:

Don't get me wrong--I'm perfectly aware that people can have catastrophic reactions to psychotropes, but this survey provides nothing like a meaningful review.


_________________
--James


staremaster
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Dec 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,726
Location: New York

06 Nov 2013, 9:25 pm

Everyone agrees that guns need some effective oversight. And people say the same thing about psychiatric medication.
But the pharmaceutical industry is much larger than the civilian gun market could ever be, and I think that its power prevents effective regulation of powerful psychiatric prescriptions.



Apple_in_my_Eye
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 7 May 2008
Age: 50
Gender: Male
Posts: 4,527
Location: in my brain

06 Nov 2013, 10:46 pm

You have to have a consultation and regular visits with a doctor (and maybe a pharmacist) to get prescription meds -- you don't need to check in with someone every 3 months to own a gun.

I say the mass shootings are all due to video games -- they all played them, so it's indisputable. The fact basically everyone now also play video games is of no relevance. [/sarcasm]



staremaster
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 2 Dec 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,726
Location: New York

06 Nov 2013, 11:37 pm

While there is some evidence that desensitization to violence can occur through games, they don't have physical side effects or create chemical dependencies.
I realize that psychiatric medications are ubiquitous, but that doesn't mean they're harmless.
And that "consultation" was kind of a joke in my personal experience.