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Erlyrisa
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03 Mar 2007, 11:28 pm

CelticGoddess wrote:
My little guy (he's 8) is on Zoloft


I was on that for about 1 month (supposed tobe 6 but I hid the little yellow soluble f'ers)

It seemed to tamper with my visual acuity and motor skills - and made me feel 'too normal' , I guess being very young ain't such a problem.

Visual Acueity: Objects 'felt' the wrong size.... just getting into a chair I felt like a pensioner lining up my bum to the seat. Objects usually appeared smaller in the distance and larger in the hand.... eg. a pen on table felt small on the otherside of the table, then looked hug in my hand.

Motor skills : it improves them strangely and with the visual impariment you feel like your going to miss something even though you don't. not only that but an over zealous confidence makes you do things you probably shouldn't (I jumped onto a moving truck)

Being too normal and happy and confident.... I personally didn't like it - I knew I wasn't me. It took a good month for the effects to wear off.

To my memory I was on 40mg.



aspimomx2
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05 Mar 2007, 6:47 pm

My son was on riperdone a couple of years ago . The kid gained about 30 lbs in 4-5 months . I keep telling the Dr. he said it was ok. When I swithed Drs. I told him he said risperone has an effect that makes you never feel full. My son took Concerta in the am which made him not hungry at lunch so by supper he was starving and the risperone made him still feel hungry. He ate aLLL evening wanting meals not snacks. I would be fighting with him at midnite because he wanted me to heat up stew for him! So just recently the Dr. wante dto put him back on it and my son said no I cant gain any more. So the DSr. suggested Geodon. It is in the risperdone family without the weight side effects. He has been on it about 6 weeks without significant gain but I m not sure if its controlling the outsbursts/meltdowns its hard to say.


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lonelymom
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26 Apr 2007, 10:07 am

My adult son is also obsessed with food, and he is not on any medication. Often his only subject of interest is what he is going to cook, or what he has, will, wants to eat. He sits and watches cooking shows all weekend. He weighs about 400 lbs now, this does not help his social life.



blessedmom
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26 Apr 2007, 10:28 am

My 16 year old son had a fascination with food. He had a stash in the drawer in his room. He gained 40 lbs. the year he was 14 and watched the food channel ALOT. I was quite disturbed and took him to a counsellor. Fortunately, he is very easy-going because I cleaned out his stash, locked the food channel and got rid of all junk food. The counsellor also taught him to view his food issue as an addiction. He is very rigid so once he saw the addiction as stupid it was easy for him to change. He now refers to cooking shows as "porn for fat people". His words, not mine. :lol:



EarthCalling
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26 Apr 2007, 10:41 am

lonelymom wrote:
My adult son is also obsessed with food, and he is not on any medication. Often his only subject of interest is what he is going to cook, or what he has, will, wants to eat. He sits and watches cooking shows all weekend. He weighs about 400 lbs now, this does not help his social life.


Could you perhaps manage to use his cooking interest to help him? Perhaps gear it to researching healthy good tasting food and alternatives to junk food? It is never easy with adult children, they have to be on side with it too or it just won't work. Maybe allow one "bad" day a week, and 6 "better ones" So he can plan all week for what he is going to cook on his "off" day!

It just seems like there should be a way through education that you can retrain his cooking to be benificial not distructive! Are there any healthy cooking classes in your area? Maybe study things like the diabetic diet? Really try to hit home with him that if things don't change soon, he is going to have a heart attack or develop diabetes, then he won't be able to eat any of his favourite foods ever again.

Also, real "gormet" cooking usually has such controled portions, it allows for a lot of "cooking" but not very much actual "eating". It may be that the portions he cooks in are what need to be adjusted, not "what" he is cooking as much.

It is not easy dealing with weight problems.

Can I ask, does he live with you? Who buys his groceries?



aspiebegood
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27 Apr 2007, 1:13 am

I was always hungry and my stomach seemed to always be in pain if I didn't have food in it. Then I discovered that I was a Celiac and once I was off the gluten life totally changed and the pain and constant hunger was gone.


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Smelena
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27 Apr 2007, 4:38 am

Claradoon wrote:
This was the result of the Too Loud book about sensory diet.
Maybe try a foot massage?


Thanks Claradoon - I'll see if I can find this book in the local library.

My 7 year old aspie is really skinny. He doesn't eat much when he's stressed.

Re stress management: exercise definantly helps. He goes to Boys Brigade on Monday night and runs round for 2 hours. He's always happy and calm when he gets back.

Smelena