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iamnotaparakeet
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07 Dec 2013, 5:54 am

At some point, I'd like to build a gaming computer and I'd like to hear any advice anyone has to offer.

What I know or think I know is this:

it needs a good graphics card, power supply, cpu, and cooling system, in addition to making certain all the hardware and software is compatible.

Corrections? Additions? Any suggestions as to particular hardware/software?



GGPViper
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07 Dec 2013, 12:18 pm

The mandatory question:

What is your level of ambition for your PC?

1. Are you looking for a PC that can run the toughest of the toughest FPS games at highest detail/frame rate (like Far Cry 3 and Battlefield 4)?

2. Are you looking for a PC that can play most modern games reliably?

3. Are you looking for a PC that can play Adventure/Casual games?


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neobluex
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08 Dec 2013, 8:20 am

Check out Unreal Development Kit or CryEngine SDK. They are free game engines (if you don't want to build one) for non-commercial use (except you want to sell the game).



iamnotaparakeet
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09 Dec 2013, 5:31 am

GGPViper wrote:
The mandatory question:

What is your level of ambition for your PC?

1. Are you looking for a PC that can run the toughest of the toughest FPS games at highest detail/frame rate (like Far Cry 3 and Battlefield 4)?

2. Are you looking for a PC that can play most modern games reliably?

3. Are you looking for a PC that can play Adventure/Casual games?


Ambitions level 1 ideally, but level 2 if level 1 were to be too pricey. At most I might be able to spend at a rate of up to $150 per month for components, saving between months for more expensive components. As it is, I have a computer that's able to play most of the games I like (Mass Effect 1 through 3, Red Faction Armagedon, Halo, Sins of a Solar Empire, Sword of the Stars, and the Command and Conquer series) at their lowest graphical and sound settings with only minor glitching and slowing down during fights with many opponents or complex effects present (like raining on one world in Mass Effect 2 slowed things down to a crawl, it seemed, until leaving that section of the level where the rain was present.) Sound is less important than graphics to me, as I don't mind wearing headphones - especially in multiplayer combat on the rare occasion where I get to work with a team that cares about winning rather than goofing around and shooting at each other when it's not a free-for-all.... Basically level 1 is my preference, and level 2 is what I'd settle for if necessary.



iamnotaparakeet
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09 Dec 2013, 5:36 am

neobluex wrote:
Check out Unreal Development Kit or CryEngine SDK. They are free game engines (if you don't want to build one) for non-commercial use (except you want to sell the game).


Thanks, I'll remember those if I want to design a game at some point... I have wanted to make an interplanetary warfare simulator at one point, using real physics for plotting orbital transfers and having a basic turn based strategy form for the main map of the game with realistic physics for real time space combat (lasers without visible beams or sounds, just cutting through hulls and disabling missiles, etc.) Thanks.



darkfuji
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11 Dec 2013, 7:24 am

try reddit.com/r/buildapc they should be able to help you with finding good parts for your needs.



Schneekugel
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11 Dec 2013, 7:46 am

I let my PCs always get built for gaming purpose, at a small computer shop, that order the parts separately and then construct the PC themselves.

The things that were always the major parts, where they focused was: graphic card, CPU/motherboard, quality brand RAM

The stuff, where they saved money was:

-memory device (I dont do video, or photostuff or whatever, so I simpy dont need the actual endless terrabyte memory device, but whatsever average "small" was always sufficient for me.

-Onboard programs like Office or other stuff. There are tons of free similar program, that can as well work with office documents.

-shell and cooler. Actually if you get a good big shell, that you clean regularly from dust (care for static electricity when doing so ^^), an standard cooler is doing the job sufficiently. If you want whyever a superdupersmall shell with as less ventilation slots as possible (because they ruin the design!) and instead tons of LED-lights and knows hell what, then you will need an quiet expensive cooler to get the heat ouf of that supertiny shell. If you have no probs with a grey, ugly giant standing beneath your desk, you can save a good amount of money. Because of me living with a partner, I play games normally with headphones, so I dont need to care for the sound-volume of the cooler noise as well. If you play games with normal sound-speakers, then if a loud cooler disturbs you, you might have to care for a more expensive silent cooler.

-peripherie stuff like a second DVD-device, 10 slots for all kind of photo memory cards, ... For CD copying, you can use without problem the memory space of your PC, so you dont need to do that directly, it simply needs a bit more time. That photocar memoryslots, are normally available everywhere else, even my printer already has slots for that, so I dont need them additionally on my computer. Just as I simply can copy that on USB at my parents, friends, ... And even if you get annoyed afterwards, for not having cared for that, then you can simply get yourself an external device, that can be connected via USB.

If you often change between headphone and speakers, care for your PC having a headphone slot at the front. ^^ (If you buy a special gaming keyboard, they regularly have installed these already at the keyboard itself.)



TheWizardofCalculus
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16 Dec 2013, 11:14 pm

Your request is problematic for a few reasons:


1.) You haven't given us a total price that you're willing to spend. Realistically, I need you to give me an absolute number, because of the following complicating factors.


2.) While it sounds good, it's a bad idea to build a computer by buying one parts every month or every other month. Firstly, you don't know what parts work until you have at least the mobo, CPU, and RAM physically in your hands, along with a monitor. You could have a broken part for months (Well outside of your time to RMA the part) without knowing it. Secondly, if you want to build a "tier one rig", you'll need 1,500/150 to 2,000/150 = 10-14 months to build it. A lot happens in the computer hardware world in 10 to 14 months. It's better to build in one go and make sure that everything is compatible, especially if you're not familiar with how to check compatibility this from the outset.


3.) Hardware gets better the more you sit around. All hardware is quickly "outdated" (not in the sense that it's unusable, but in the sense that there's now a better model/version out there for the same price that you'd have paid 10 months ago). Sometimes with little performance boost (5%), but other times with massive performance upgrades (20-30%). So as long as you can't use the machine until you have all the parts, there's no sense in slowly buying parts until you've mapped out in your head:

A.) What you're willing to spend,
B.) What you need the machine for.
C.) What components will fulfill your needs.
D.) Are those components compatible? If not, are there similar components that are compatible?


In other words, you want to save up your money now, build your machine later. If you answer (A) through (D), however, I would wager that I could provide you with some pretty useful help.