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Max000
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25 Jan 2014, 2:20 pm

daar wrote:
I try to keep my digital footprint so transparent to the point where I would not have to delete anything significant if problems did arise for whatever reason. Sure I am a bit paranoid, but not trusting companies with your information now is the same thing as not trusting companies with your information in the future. I don't know what policies are going to change and what my information is going to be grandfathered into through some legal bs.


Me too. When did people start to think that it was OK to post all of their personal information on internet for billions of people to see?



ModusPonens
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25 Jan 2014, 2:29 pm

Max000 wrote:
ModusPonens wrote:
Man, once google started censuring the internet in China, it destroyed that phony "don't do evil" image.


And then sent Google Streetview cars out to suck up information from people's private wireless networks.

It would be hard for any other company to compete with Google for evil.


Facebook? Idk. :)

And you know what? The joke now is on us. But in 10 to 20 years from now each individual will have the power to scrutinize any other individual's life. So the politicians, banks and predatory corporations will have to behave. This joke will turn around on them and it's going to be awsome. 8)



Max000
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25 Jan 2014, 2:39 pm

TallyMan wrote:
tern wrote:
TallyMan wrote:
I used to create a Yahoo email address for each new site I joined, but I see now that Yahoo requires a valid mobile phone number for account activation.

How recent is that?! I created a Yahoo address only 5 months ago without that, and I remember Gmail's requirement to phone you to confirm your identity was the clincher against going for them when a couple of Gmail fans were telling me to: also disliked all the google unification of personal profiles on web.
I don't even have a mobile phone, nor want one, as I have a big aspie coping problem with using the phone. I have a landline though, and testing now with the British Yahoo sign-up form and which boxes it says are still required to be filled in, it is accepting the landline number, which does not begin with the 07 code that all mobile numbers here have to begin with. Yet searching on the subject, I can find some much older links to folks saying a number had become required. Scratches head.


It was around three weeks ago. I filled in all the relevant forms, solved the captcha etc and as the final step it said I needed to specify a mobile phone number for a confirmation code SMS to be sent to. I tried to skip the step but it wouldn't allow it. I tried putting in a fake phone number but it said the number wasn't valid. I made up another number of the required format then the next window asked me to enter the code that had been sent to the number. I abandoned Yahoo registration at that point. I've since started to phase out my other Yahoo email addresses, I've not been very happy with the quality of their service for some time - their webmail is overbloated and slow and they try to make a social network based on the people I've corresponded with via email. I also access Yahoo email via POP3 and there is a high download failure rate due to their servers being down or otherwise not working - another day and they work fine again, the following day down again. Yahoo has become a rubbish and erratic service I want nothing more to do with. Giving your mobile phone number (or landline number) is a good piece of information that allows companies like Yahoo to unify your details along with your address and goodness knows what else if they share data with the telecoms company.


Don't give up on Yahoo too fast. Try their mobile site. It's great, at least for now. No bloatware.

m.yahoo.com

If I had the money, I would probably get a few cheap pre-paid throw away cell phones, just to use the phone numbers.



Max000
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25 Jan 2014, 2:54 pm

ModusPonens wrote:
Max000 wrote:
ModusPonens wrote:
Man, once google started censuring the internet in China, it destroyed that phony "don't do evil" image.


And then sent Google Streetview cars out to suck up information from people's private wireless networks.

It would be hard for any other company to compete with Google for evil.


Facebook? Idk. :)


Facebook is a close second, but they can't beat Google. As bad as Facebook is, I don't think they have ever been in cahoots with a communist government to censor the internet, or trying to steal information from private wireless networks. Not that they wouldn't probably like to, but they don't have the resources like Google does. Google really wants to take over the internet, and the world for that matter.

Lots of people don't have a Facebook. They don't like it, they don't use it. But how do you not use Google?



sliqua-jcooter
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25 Jan 2014, 3:01 pm

Max000 wrote:
And then sent Google Streetview cars out to suck up information from people's private wireless networks.


WiFi is in the 2.4 Ghz ISM band. That band is completely unlicensed - and free for *anyone* to use *for any reason*. That inherently means your wifi is not, in any way shape or form, "private".


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Max000
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25 Jan 2014, 3:15 pm

Kraichgauer wrote:
My heart goes out to the transgender woman driven to suicide after being outed by Google, as cited by the OP.


As bad as that was, it might not be quite as bad as it sounds. She was not innocent. She was running a scam. ESPN probably shouldn't have reported on her being transgender, but they were certainly right to expose her scam. And I'm not sure it was Googles fault, if she put her information out there.

Whether she killed herself for being "outed" as transgender, or for being a fraud will never be known. I kind of lean to thinking that she killed herself because she was worried about going to prison, rather then what people would think about her being transgender. But thats just my opinion.



Max000
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25 Jan 2014, 3:37 pm

sliqua-jcooter wrote:
Max000 wrote:
And then sent Google Streetview cars out to suck up information from people's private wireless networks.


WiFi is in the 2.4 Ghz ISM band. That band is completely unlicensed - and free for *anyone* to use *for any reason*. That inherently means your wifi is not, in any way shape or form, "private".


Okay, that is your opinion. Regardless it is a violation of US federal wiretap laws. Google was found guilty and apologized for it.



Kraichgauer
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25 Jan 2014, 3:42 pm

TallyMan wrote:
It certainly doesn't inspire trust in Google, not that I've got any trust in them and the other corporate giants who routinely collect and use our personal information as currency.

I have a different identity and email address on each and every website, forum or other online presence. The collation of multiple identities and move towards forcing everyone to use real names is a very bad for everyone, except advertisers who can target sh** at us more accurately or anyone with malicious intentions / stalkers.

I'm a heterosexual male, but I don't want everyone in the world relating my real name to the fact I have Asperger's, cyclothymia and have previously attempted suicide - I don't want prospective employers, neighbours or other acquaintances knowing aspects of my private life. That is why I'm TallyMan on here not my real name. Similarly in my role as moderator I've banned some very nasty people from this site including self-professed psychopaths and I don't want them knowing who I am or where I live (that happened once to another mod and she was physically stalked and harassed).

I used to create a Yahoo email address for each new site I joined, but I see now that Yahoo requires a valid mobile phone number for account activation. Fu*k that! I am not giving away such information. So now I use throwaway email addresses to register on sites.

All the big internet companies are vying to collect our personal information and to use it in ways that do not reflect our interests, but theirs. Well f*ck them all I say. Sites that insist on my date of birth get pure fiction; the same with any other "required" fields.


Your name isn't really TallyMan!?!?!?!? :o :o :o :o :o :o


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Max000
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25 Jan 2014, 3:43 pm

ruveyn wrote:
Did Google Inc. violate any laws?


Yes, they did.

Google loses appeal in Street View privacy lawsuit



sliqua-jcooter
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25 Jan 2014, 3:48 pm

Max000 wrote:
Okay, that is your opinion. Regardless it is a violation of US federal wiretap laws. Google was found guilty and apologized for it.


It's not my opinion, it's a fact. And Google hasn't been found guilty of anything, they just had their legal opinion rejected by the 9th circuit - the lawsuits are still in progress. Get your facts straight.


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Max000
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25 Jan 2014, 4:32 pm

beneficii wrote:
I've had a better experience with Yahoo! Japan, but Yahoo! Japan's services tend to be a quite bit different from the rest of the world's. For example, while there is the bloated Yahoo! Answers, in Japan Yahoo! has instead Chiebukuro (meaning "bag of wisdom"), which is a much less bloated website, and is completely different from Yahoo! Answers, despite providing the same type of service (being able to ask questions which are answered by other users).

Yahoo! Japan even still has GeoCities, which was shut down in the rest of the world!


I love Yahoo Japan. It's just like what Yahoo looked like in 1995. Why do websites never change in Japan? Our websites just keep getting more sucky all the time, but Japanese sites stay the same forever, and they never go out of business. Not just GeoCities, but many others too. For example Stickam Japan is still going strong despite the failure of the international site. If it works in Japan, why doesn't it work anywhere else? Part of it I know is that most of the Japanese sites are Japanese owned, with a different business attitude. But still.

I know this is going to sound crazy, but I really think there is a conspiracy to just wreck the internet, and somehow Japan is immune to it. How else can you explain why so many popular websites get shut down for no apparent reason, and others just get one bad update after another. Year after year, every single update getting 95% negative feed back, but they just keep going with the same crap. Look at what Google is doing to YouTube. That can't be an accident. They can't be that incompetent.



Max000
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25 Jan 2014, 4:39 pm

sliqua-jcooter wrote:
Max000 wrote:
Okay, that is your opinion. Regardless it is a violation of US federal wiretap laws. Google was found guilty and apologized for it.


It's not my opinion, it's a fact. And Google hasn't been found guilty of anything, they just had their legal opinion rejected by the 9th circuit - the lawsuits are still in progress. Get your facts straight.


:roll:

Google acknowledged in May 2010 that its cars had collected inadvertently some personal data from unencrypted networks, and publicly apologized. The company also settled earlier this year for $7 million with 37 U.S. states and the District of Columbia over its unauthorized collection of personal data transmitted over Wi-Fi networks. Google has faced probes and fines over the data collection in other countries as well.

Google loses appeal in Street View privacy lawsuit



sliqua-jcooter
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25 Jan 2014, 4:41 pm

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/ ... _View_case

Quote:
Last September, the Ninth Circuit upheld the District Court's ruling after Google filed an appeal. This week's ruling reaffirms that opinion.

However, it also deletes a significant portion of the earlier ruling in which the court held that unencrypted communications sent from or received by an open Wi-Fi network was not generally accessible to the public. The court also granted a Google request for a rehearing of the case.


Again, get your facts straight. Also, the wiretap law only applies as long as you are "intentionally intercepting" data. All Google would have to do if they legitimately wanted to capture wifi data would be *join the network*.


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25 Jan 2014, 11:48 pm

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