Advice for riding a plane alone cross country with ASD

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zarok
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31 Jan 2014, 2:26 am

I have that one soundtrack I suppose. Now I just need some noise cancelling headphones but I guess its the fact that I lack a plethora of songs to choose from and music is expensive


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31 Jan 2014, 6:17 am

I cant agree about the window seat. For me communication with strangers is very complicated, so that was really a struggle for me, when I myself needed to get out to the toilette, that I had to contact the person beside me. Specially when the person was sleeping, I did not know what to do or how to react.

I dont have any probs about flying itself and dong get excited about it. (If it crashes it crashes, and me being afraid about it, will not have any influence. I you ever meet a person going on to breakfast while the airplane is starting to do 1 meter jumps, thats me. ^^) But because of the surrounding sleeping is not possible to me. You have the engines noise, then there is always someone talking or whispering, people standing up, getting something out of their bags, putting them bag into the overhead shelves again ... no sleeping for me.

If you can choose an airplane seats there are several that are to be preferred. The seats at the emergency exits normally have some inches more space for the legs, so that there is enough space to enter the exit-doors, when its opened. However, if you mention to have an disability, they will most likely not give it to you, because passengers on emergency seats are supposed to be able to react instantly in case of emergency, and be able to communicate without probs, so that they can clear the exits seats as fast as possible. So normally they place on purpose younger people, being able to speak the airplane-workers general language fluently, on these seats.

The last seats in rows have the benefit, that there will be noone behind you, always bumping against your seat every now and then, when placing stuff in the seatbag in front of him, moving his seat-table, standing up....

The front seats in each row normally offer the benefit, that they have as well some more space for legs, and that noone might eventually annoy you when leaning back with his seat. In the opposite, having nothing in front of you then an wall, annoys some people.

For me, I prefer either front seats of an row or emergency seats. If I know the persons between me and the floor, I have no probs sitting inside or at the window, but if I dont know the persons I prefer being myself at the floor-seat, so that I dont need to talk to people, when I stand up.

I´d recomment having some music with you, that you like, because even when reading or playing games, the surrounding noise of the airplane disturbs me otherwise. Good earplugs are ok as well, but might annoy you, when the airplanes lifts and goes down, so its easier for your ears to adapt to the changing air-pressure, without wearing airsealed earplugs. ^^



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31 Jan 2014, 8:23 am

One warning if you decide to wear earplugs - unless you get the special ones designed for airplanes, DO NOT wear them during take-off or landing. On the runway is fine, or after the plane's altitude has stabilized, but I learned from hard experience one time when I wore earplugs during take-off and then took them off in the air to answer a question from a stewardess. PAIN! So much pain. My ears hurt for days. I do not recommend it.


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zarok
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31 Jan 2014, 12:17 pm

See this is so great I would not have guessed that, Luckily for me communicating in crisis where social rules no longer apply is much easier than when i know there are many rules. But it really depends on alot of things, Like i was a cashier for a few months and even though the stress was incredible I did handle it ok even if i was a bit slower than everyone else.

Ok so noise canceling ear things and some music. plus my book, I have been thinking's and I am hoping to find a seat with a decent view though I have noticed with planes that unless they are turning, you cant really see the ground. soooo not sure about that. I will be able to choose my seat to a point as we will be boarding and then picking seats. I may get to go first, though I would really like it if i didnt have to sit by someone at all, How nice it would be to fly with only like a dozen people. My parents said they might seat me by a stewardess.

Any ideas for what I should do about my tick, I dont really think about it alot as is is such a new development for me, but yesterday at walmart I got really stressed and started doing it and I had some people start staring. I dont care so much but on a plane or going through security i worry. Also the fact if they decide to do a random search ill probably have a anxiety attack and look even more suspicious.

Also, I have titanium rods in my ankle, will they have to do something special about that? do i need a card or something?


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02 Feb 2014, 5:21 pm

zarok wrote:
How does one get those kind of cards? I may need one seeing as I have a tick as well.


I hand write or type before hand short information cards.

I have one for general use (trouble talking, I stim, all because AS).
I have one asking to pre-board, this lets you get on the plane first. Most places let anyone with AS preboard, no problem.
I have one for stewardeses, it is more detailed, explains how to get my attention in emergency, how I need to communicate.
I have one for TSA asking to go to the short line (and why, AS, anxiety in lines etc).

You will need some thing to give or be able to tell the security people at the x-ray what not machines that you have a titanium implant and where it is. They may scan you normally with it, or they may pat you down (in a non-intrusive way).

Sleep if you can, I have a neck pillow for comfort.

People say headphones because of the noise factor.

I have not had anyone treat me badly because of my anxiety, or weirdness, or stimming.


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Buttercup
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02 Feb 2014, 7:47 pm

I used to carry short information cards, handwritten on index cards (legibly). These can be handy when flying, or anywhere you may get totally overwhelmed.
Earplugs I recommend, but as somebody else already said, remove them while the cabin is pressuring.
I like puzzles, so I usually take some.
And every once in awhile I also get a tick under very high stress. Mine tends to be on one side, so I would sit with that side towards a window so if I didn't get the window seat I'd only have to explain to one person. Most people these days know a tick when they see it and don't ask questions.
The titanium rod shouldn't be a problem with TSA. I know someone who flew with one recently and he wasn't hassled at all.
And some anti-anxiety medication probably won't hurt.
I admire you for seeking help!



zarok
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03 Feb 2014, 12:25 am

I leave in a few hours thanks for all your help! be back in a few months!


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