Signs of Aspergers in preschool girls

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zette
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27 Feb 2014, 9:27 am

Saw this article in a local support newsletter, and thought some here might be interested. I'm not familiar with the blogger so I can't vouch for her credibility, but it seems like a reasonable list to me.

http://taniaannmarshall.wordpress.com/2013/06/22/first-signs-of-asperger-syndrome-in-young-girls-pre-school/

My 4 yo fraternal twin girls are both intense, each in her own way, but so far they are doing well socially and engaging in cooperative, imaginative play. It was good to read this list and not see too many red flags.



YippySkippy
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27 Feb 2014, 10:31 am

Number 20 (intuitive) stands out to me. It's something I've experienced throughout my life, but I've never seen it discussed. I like to watch Jeopardy, and often the correct responses will pop into my head as if from nowhere. My husband always says, "How do you know that?!" Honestly, I usually have no idea. It's almost like someone's telling me the answer - that's what it feels like. Though I don't believe there's a mystical explanation. Most likely, I heard/read/saw the answer somewhere before, and my brain captured it without me being aware of it.



BirdInFlight
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27 Feb 2014, 12:38 pm

zette wrote:
Saw this article in a local support newsletter, and thought some here might be interested. I'm not familiar with the blogger so I can't vouch for her credibility, but it seems like a reasonable list to me.

http://taniaannmarshall.wordpress.com/2013/06/22/first-signs-of-asperger-syndrome-in-young-girls-pre-school/

My 4 yo fraternal twin girls are both intense, each in her own way, but so far they are doing well socially and engaging in cooperative, imaginative play. It was good to read this list and not see too many red flags.


I got chills reading that, because except for only two things, it was all me at that age. And many things my sister did too.


.



League_Girl
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27 Feb 2014, 12:48 pm

I was speech delayed so it's hard to say the other things fit me but I recognized others that did. But as I got older, I did when I could talk more and better.


_________________
Son: Diagnosed w/anxiety and ADHD. Also academic delayed.

Daughter: NT, no diagnoses.


michael517
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27 Feb 2014, 1:42 pm

Sounds like my daughter.

She was also very 'collicky' if that is an adjective. She would cry and cry, wouldn't fall asleep until she ran out of cry, poor thing. I still wonder if there was something in her intestines giving her pain.

I really miss when I would come home from work and play with her - for like two hours - to relieve my wife.



michael517
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27 Feb 2014, 1:48 pm

Found another page of that author here ....

http://taniaannmarshall.wordpress.com/2 ... clude=1797

Check out this statement regarding Aspie girls...

Quote:
They use the strategy of waiting,watching, observing carefully and then participating when they are sure of what to do, by imitating other people and/or what they have done previously. What they have done previously may be inappropriate to the current situation.


Isn't that all Aspies? Sure is me.



ASDMommyASDKid
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27 Feb 2014, 2:35 pm

Sometimes boys can be more impulsive and maybe a greater percentage of them cannot do this. My son does not attempt to blend in at all.

Part of it with girls is they are much less likely to be spotted early and so I think the resources for girls are more likely to be geared for "hidden" cases. A lot of times the stereotypes do a better job of catching the boys, and in fact just being a girl is more likely to make a pediatrician think it could not possibly be ASD. It is not that there are not ASD boys who have these skills, though, Many, many of them do.

I am not diagnosed due to age, but also I think I would have flown past the radar in many ways. My brother is also (I think) ASD, but he is milder than I am. I would not have been surprised if he were younger and growing up today if he might have gotten a diagnosis, today. I do not think I would have, despite having more social difficulties.



CWA
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28 Feb 2014, 8:48 pm

ASDMommyASDKid wrote:
Sometimes boys can be more impulsive and maybe a greater percentage of them cannot do this. My son does not attempt to blend in at all.

Part of it with girls is they are much less likely to be spotted early and so I think the resources for girls are more likely to be geared for "hidden" cases. A lot of times the stereotypes do a better job of catching the boys, and in fact just being a girl is more likely to make a pediatrician think it could not possibly be ASD. It is not that there are not ASD boys who have these skills, though, Many, many of them do.

I am not diagnosed due to age, but also I think I would have flown past the radar in many ways. My brother is also (I think) ASD, but he is milder than I am. I would not have been surprised if he were younger and growing up today if he might have gotten a diagnosis, today. I do not think I would have, despite having more social difficulties.


My daughter presents more like a boy and is considered to be moderately autistic rather than passengers as a result. She makes no attempt to fit in or get along and admits to just not caring at all. We caught it early as a result, she was just shy of five. Nearly every point on this list applies except for parts pertaining to fiction, writing, imitation, and imagination.