Gender identity issues related to autism, ADHD

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beneficii
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18 Mar 2014, 3:45 pm

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/822077


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18 Mar 2014, 4:09 pm

Need to sign up to view the link, and would this not be more fitting for the LGBT section anyway?


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18 Mar 2014, 4:46 pm

Okay, so the "high prevalence disputed" bit is wrongheaded -

Quote:
A study limitation was the use of parent-reported data, according to Dr. Butter, who was not involved with the research.

"Parents will respond to that question ["wishes to be the opposite sex"] from their own experience and their own cultural expectations of gender," he said. "Does a response of 'wishes to be the opposite sex' mean a little girl likes to play with trucks and a boy likes playing with dolls, or does it mean a child is uncomfortable with his or her gender and wants to be the opposite sex?"


It is common for cisgender people who criticize gender variance to latch onto ideas about playing with trucks and dolls as a supposed reason (many cisgender people will criticize a transgender person's transition by assuming that they think they should transition because they like things associated with the other gender, for example, because they can't imagine such a need deriving from anything valid). Unlike Dr. Butter, I think parents are quite capable of discerning the difference between "My child wants to be a girl" and "My child plays with dolls." I am skeptical of both the motivations and relationship to reality of Dr. Butter's objections.

I can't find it now, but there was a study a few years ago in Europe that found higher rates of autism among transgender people. Whether the statistics are accurate in either case, there's probably enough evidence to explore further.

I don't think this study or the other explored prevalance of nonbinary gender (with or without desire to transition) among autistic people as well, and it seems - anecdotally - that there are quite a few autistic people who fit this category as well.



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18 Mar 2014, 7:09 pm

In my case, it means that I'm uncomfortable about my gender and I wish to be the opposite sex. I identify as my preferred gender here on WP.


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beneficii
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18 Mar 2014, 7:12 pm

Verdandi wrote:
Okay, so the "high prevalence disputed" bit is wrongheaded -

Quote:
A study limitation was the use of parent-reported data, according to Dr. Butter, who was not involved with the research.

"Parents will respond to that question ["wishes to be the opposite sex"] from their own experience and their own cultural expectations of gender," he said. "Does a response of 'wishes to be the opposite sex' mean a little girl likes to play with trucks and a boy likes playing with dolls, or does it mean a child is uncomfortable with his or her gender and wants to be the opposite sex?"


It is common for cisgender people who criticize gender variance to latch onto ideas about playing with trucks and dolls as a supposed reason (many cisgender people will criticize a transgender person's transition by assuming that they think they should transition because they like things associated with the other gender, for example, because they can't imagine such a need deriving from anything valid). Unlike Dr. Butter, I think parents are quite capable of discerning the difference between "My child wants to be a girl" and "My child plays with dolls." I am skeptical of both the motivations and relationship to reality of Dr. Butter's objections.

I can't find it now, but there was a study a few years ago in Europe that found higher rates of autism among transgender people. Whether the statistics are accurate in either case, there's probably enough evidence to explore further.

I don't think this study or the other explored prevalance of nonbinary gender (with or without desire to transition) among autistic people as well, and it seems - anecdotally - that there are quite a few autistic people who fit this category as well.


Good point on cross-gender activities not necessarily meaning one is transgender. That is one thing that gets conflated way too much.


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06 Oct 2019, 7:34 am

Priceless .. wonders if any posters here still survive . Read of higher than average death rate amongst
Gender persons and ASD persons,percentage wise . Reference: Google.


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aquafelix
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06 Oct 2019, 9:20 pm

Verdandi wrote:
It is common for cisgender people who criticize gender variance to latch onto ideas about playing with trucks and dolls as a supposed reason (many cisgender people will criticize a transgender person's transition by assuming that they think they should transition because they like things associated with the other gender, for example, because they can't imagine such a need deriving from anything valid). Unlike Dr. Butter, I think parents are quite capable of discerning the difference between "My child wants to be a girl" and "My child plays with dolls." I am skeptical of both the motivations and relationship to reality of Dr. Butter's objections.

I can't find it now, but there was a study a few years ago in Europe that found higher rates of autism among transgender people. Whether the statistics are accurate in either case, there's probably enough evidence to explore further.

I don't think this study or the other explored prevalance of nonbinary gender (with or without desire to transition) among autistic people as well, and it seems - anecdotally - that there are quite a few autistic people who fit this category as well.


I agree Verdandi. I've always been a big sissy myself (which I quickly learned to hide otherwise I got beat up by boys at school), and I think my autism has greatly influences that. I'm probably something like what is labeled "non-binary", but I have zero attachment to that term.

I think research is understanding that there isn't a categorical difference between a fully transitioned person and a non-binary or fluid person. I don't think gender quirks are a special case, I think autistic people have less attachment to traditional social norms, "nonconformism" which including gender roles and identity as well as a truckload of other things.



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06 Oct 2019, 11:41 pm

aquafelix wrote:
Verdandi wrote:
It is common for cisgender people who criticize gender variance to latch onto ideas about playing with trucks and dolls as a supposed reason (many cisgender people will criticize a transgender person's transition by assuming that they think they should transition because they like things associated with the other gender, for example, because they can't imagine such a need deriving from anything valid). Unlike Dr. Butter, I think parents are quite capable of discerning the difference between "My child wants to be a girl" and "My child plays with dolls." I am skeptical of both the motivations and relationship to reality of Dr. Butter's objections.

I can't find it now, but there was a study a few years ago in Europe that found higher rates of autism among transgender people. Whether the statistics are accurate in either case, there's probably enough evidence to explore further.

I don't think this study or the other explored prevalance of nonbinary gender (with or without desire to transition) among autistic people as well, and it seems - anecdotally - that there are quite a few autistic people who fit this category as well.


I agree Verdandi. I've always been a big sissy myself (which I quickly learned to hide otherwise I got beat up by boys at school), and I think my autism has greatly influences that. I'm probably something like what is labeled "non-binary", but I have zero attachment to that term.

I think research is understanding that there isn't a categorical difference between a fully transitioned person and a non-binary or fluid person. I don't think gender quirks are a special case, I think autistic people have less attachment to traditional social norms, "nonconformism" which including gender roles and identity as well as a truckload of other things.


Seen some of the same european reports.. agreed but where , is the level playing field in non conformity ? Lol :D


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aquafelix
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08 Oct 2019, 3:42 am

Jakki wrote:
aquafelix wrote:
Verdandi wrote:
It is common for cisgender people who criticize gender variance to latch onto ideas about playing with trucks and dolls as a supposed reason (many cisgender people will criticize a transgender person's transition by assuming that they think they should transition because they like things associated with the other gender, for example, because they can't imagine such a need deriving from anything valid). Unlike Dr. Butter, I think parents are quite capable of discerning the difference between "My child wants to be a girl" and "My child plays with dolls." I am skeptical of both the motivations and relationship to reality of Dr. Butter's objections.

I can't find it now, but there was a study a few years ago in Europe that found higher rates of autism among transgender people. Whether the statistics are accurate in either case, there's probably enough evidence to explore further.

I don't think this study or the other explored prevalance of nonbinary gender (with or without desire to transition) among autistic people as well, and it seems - anecdotally - that there are quite a few autistic people who fit this category as well.


I agree Verdandi. I've always been a big sissy myself (which I quickly learned to hide otherwise I got beat up by boys at school), and I think my autism has greatly influences that. I'm probably something like what is labeled "non-binary", but I have zero attachment to that term.

I think research is understanding that there isn't a categorical difference between a fully transitioned person and a non-binary or fluid person. I don't think gender quirks are a special case, I think autistic people have less attachment to traditional social norms, "nonconformism" which including gender roles and identity as well as a truckload of other things.


Seen some of the same european reports.. agreed but where , is the level playing field in non conformity ? Lol :D

I think non-conformity is a fairly lumpy playing field. Non-conformists are the bumpy bits that upset an otherwise lovely uniformly level social surface.