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Alyron
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09 Apr 2014, 3:36 pm

I've got Asperger's. In my first job I couldn't handle my coworkers. After six months I ended up in a mental hospital. So now I need to find a job where I don't have to deal with colleagues. I'd rather not work with customers either. Do you know any jobs like that?



Alternative
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09 Apr 2014, 3:48 pm

Cheap, cleaning jobs?

What country are you from? What kind of support are you getting?



PaulHubert
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09 Apr 2014, 4:30 pm

Accounting and Programming (for the most part), both tend to match the stereotypical aspie stregnths; both will be in high demand for the foreseeable future.



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09 Apr 2014, 4:47 pm

Right now I'm working as a cashier, and I'm f*****g sick of dealing with customers. The problem is, it's nearly impossible to find an entry-level job in my area that doesn't require interacting with customers, or performing any sort of physical labor, or working long hours. My friend's mother has told me that with my Aspergers and my Metis heritage (which I don't have a card for yet, but am planning on getting), that there should be a good number of educational grants out there for me. I'm seriously considering saving up my money, quitting my job, and just becoming a student full time so that I can work towards getting into a career I can actually tolerate.



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09 Apr 2014, 4:57 pm

I spent my career in a studio, playing music and talking to myself through a mic and a set of headphones. Unfortunately, there are not nearly as many of those jobs available as there used to be, before they automated everything with desktop PCs, but if you're a competent computer programmer, that's the bulk of the job now, the machine does virtually everything else.



Last edited by Willard on 11 Apr 2014, 10:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

BornThisWay
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09 Apr 2014, 6:05 pm

light house keeper... or a person who lives in the smoke towers out in the forest. Property care taking for absent owners...dog walker, pet caretaker or house sitting. Some of these are more entrepeneurial = you work for yourself and your own business.

Google - 'jobs for loners' = 47,800 results - the first page entries had some decent suggestions with a fairly wide variety - and none of them involved saying ' have a nice day, thank you for shopping at ....' over and over and over....



SoftwareEngineer
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09 Apr 2014, 6:57 pm

Alyron wrote:
I couldn't handle my coworkers.


Can you explain a bit more about your coworkers? In particular, was the problem just their presence and normal behavior, or were you in some way purposefully made uncomfortable?



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09 Apr 2014, 8:18 pm

My brother is an introvert and has loved being an auto mechanic, so that would be my first recommendation. My next recommendations would be a nature photographer, forest ranger, construction (specifically excavation), carpentry, forestry, or librarian.



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09 Apr 2014, 9:14 pm

In any job, there will be some level of co-worker interaction, even if it is just a superior giving you work. It can't be ruled out, but there are jobs that could handle lesser face-to-face interaction, jobs that are work at home and jobs that co-workers only interact with e-mail or telephone.

Otherwise an employer should know there are significant problems with speaking to people, they should know so they can reasonably adjust to your desired working environment.


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MissDorkness
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10 Apr 2014, 10:04 am

PaulHubert wrote:
Accounting and Programming (for the most part), both tend to match the stereotypical aspie stregnths; both will be in high demand for the foreseeable future.
:lol: funny, I've done both.
Accounting, then drafting/cad management now system administration/programming.
I probably would have stuck with accounting, if it hadn't been for my temp job being in a noisy cube farm full of high-pitched women. It really turned me off. If I'd have worked alone or in a quiet office, I might've stuck with it.
It's cool, I like being a system admin, if it weren't for the unpredictability and short memories of myusers, it would be perfect. ;)



Alyron
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10 Apr 2014, 3:05 pm

Alternative wrote:
Cheap, cleaning jobs?

What country are you from? What kind of support are you getting?


I'll put cleaning jobs on the list.

I live in Germany. Right now I'm living with my parents. I don't claim any benefits or something like that.

PaulHubert wrote:
Accounting and Programming (for the most part), both tend to match the stereotypical aspie stregnths; both will be in high demand for the foreseeable future.


I'll put it on my list. I used to do very basic programming in school. It might even be something I enjoy.

mr_bigmouth_502 wrote:
Right now I'm working as a cashier, and I'm f***ing sick of dealing with customers. The problem is, it's nearly impossible to find an entry-level job in my area that doesn't require interacting with customers, or performing any sort of physical labor, or working long hours. My friend's mother has told me that with my Aspergers and my Metis heritage (which I don't have a card for yet, but am planning on getting), that there should be a good number of educational grants out there for me. I'm seriously considering saving up my money, quitting my job, and just becoming a student full time so that I can work towards getting into a career I can actually tolerate.


Good luck.

Willard wrote:
I spent my career in a radio studio, playing music and talking to myself through a mic and a set of headphones. Unfortunately, there are not nearly as many of those jobs available as there used to be, before they automated everything with desktop PCs, but if you're a competent computer programmer, that's the bulk of the job now, the machine does virtually everything else.


I love radio. Well, I guess a lot of people do. I listen to the radio 3 to 6 hours every day. I imagine working in radio would be very exciting, but I don't think I could deal with other people.

BornThisWay wrote:
light house keeper... or a person who lives in the smoke towers out in the forest. Property care taking for absent owners...dog walker, pet caretaker or house sitting. Some of these are more entrepeneurial = you work for yourself and your own business.

Google - 'jobs for loners' = 47,800 results - the first page entries had some decent suggestions with a fairly wide variety - and none of them involved saying ' have a nice day, thank you for shopping at ....' over and over and over....


I've already searched for 'jobs for people who don't like people', 'jobs for introverts', 'jobs for people with social anxiety' and so on. So far results have been mixed. I'll give 'jobs for loners' a go.

SoftwareEngineer wrote:
Alyron wrote:
I couldn't handle my coworkers.


Can you explain a bit more about your coworkers? In particular, was the problem just their presence and normal behavior, or were you in some way purposefully made uncomfortable?


I'd say it was just normal behaviour. I don't think anyone went out of their way to upset me. They didn't hold back, when I did something wrong or when I didn't do it fast enough. I have trouble with everday conversations. I can't really talk to people, but I get the awkwardness, I get the tension. So I try to avoid people. I hide away, find something to do, take longer for something I can do on my own. Of course people notice. They get angry. It creates more tension.
I got transferred into a different department two times. This problem about dealing with people happend every time.

Soccer22 wrote:
My brother is an introvert and has loved being an auto mechanic, so that would be my first recommendation. My next recommendations would be a nature photographer, forest ranger, construction (specifically excavation), carpentry, forestry, or librarian.


Mechanics here work in garages with a handful of other guys. It's basically an all-male job and they also have to deal with customers. I'm not sure that's the right environment for me. Nature photographer seems to be risky. If you don't get excellent pictures that sell themselves, you need to network or at least communicate well to get the job or to get your pictures in a magazine or exhibition. Forest ranger and carpenter go on my list. To me construction looks like another all-male job where I would have to communicate with colleagues. I've thought about librarian. I think I could deal with borrowers. The interaction range would be limited. I don't know about coworkers though.

PerfectlyDarkTails wrote:
In any job, there will be some level of co-worker interaction, even if it is just a superior giving you work. It can't be ruled out, but there are jobs that could handle lesser face-to-face interaction, jobs that are work at home and jobs that co-workers only interact with e-mail or telephone.

Otherwise an employer should know there are significant problems with speaking to people, they should know so they can reasonably adjust to your desired working environment.


Well, I can handle some interaction with coworkers. I guess it's okay when I only see them during breaks or in occasional meetings. It gets problematic when I have to work with them or alongside them for the whole day.



SoftwareEngineer
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10 Apr 2014, 6:21 pm

This is an interesting problem that many people face. Did you discuss the problem with a supervisor? And, if so, did your supervisor offer any solutions? Personally, I've been driven out of more than one workplace by direct and indirect harassment. I'm wondering if someone, or a group, may have been turning up the heat.



Alyron
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12 Apr 2014, 10:37 am

SoftwareEngineer wrote:
This is an interesting problem that many people face. Did you discuss the problem with a supervisor? And, if so, did your supervisor offer any solutions? Personally, I've been driven out of more than one workplace by direct and indirect harassment. I'm wondering if someone, or a group, may have been turning up the heat.


Are you an actual software engineer? Because when I search for 'jobs for loners' or whatever computer programmer comes up a lot. What's it like? Do you work alone? How were you driven out of your workplace?



mr_bigmouth_502
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14 Apr 2014, 1:13 am

I was transferred to the deli at the grocery store I work at. It's not nearly as exciting as working at a till, but at least I don't have to deal with so many damn customers. :P The work's not hectic either, though I do find it to be a bit boring and menial.



OliveOilMom
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24 Apr 2014, 11:11 pm

Embalming. If you are an embalmer instead of a funeral director you don't deal with the families and nowdays they are all using central warehouse type embalming facilities. You work with nobody except the dead. You can't offend anybody, you can't bore anybody, they won't complain about your talking or lack of it, and the worst thing you can do is accidentally bring somebody back to life. Here it's a 2 year degree and apprenticeship but the funeral homes usually pay for the school for you once you have the apprenticeship there or they reimburse you later and you sign a contract.

Thats about the least social interaction you'll get.


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