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Do you lucid dream?
Ouais. 82%  82%  [ 18 ]
Nay. 18%  18%  [ 4 ]
Total votes : 22

BeggingTurtle
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10 Apr 2014, 7:29 pm

I recently learned that lucid dreaming was when you control your dreams, so I stopped and said, "Wait, not everyone can do that??"

I also suspect that autistic people have a higher possibility of lucid dreaming as well.


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kraftiekortie
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10 Apr 2014, 7:47 pm

I tend to have vivid and lucid dreams, sometimes even with a soundtrack LOL....I tend to forget them upon awakening. I should really try to remember them and write them down.



Soham
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10 Apr 2014, 7:57 pm

I've been able to lucid dream since I was a little kid, I'm now in my late 20s. I remember a lot of dreams I've had all through out my life as well, it's like a totally different life/realm I go to when I "sleep".

I don't lucid dream every single night, but I often dream vividly and remember my dreams from every night. I have at least one lucid dream a week, where I'm fully aware that I'm in a dream and have control over what I'm doing and where I want to go. The best is when I'm able to fly, or create & manifest anything I want in my dream.


I also experience a lot of other sleep & dream related things from time to time, such as sleep paralysis and other bizarre out of body experiences. I've been curious if those on the spectrum are more prone to having vivid dreams, and/or lucid dreams and related things.



Callista
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10 Apr 2014, 7:58 pm

Yes. Often.

I think it has something to do with my tendency to sleep rather lightly, so that I push closer to awareness even while dreaming.

Most people have lucid dreams occasionally. There have even been some interesting experiments done--people who have a lot of lucid dreams sleep in a sleep lab, with sensors on their eyes, and they move their eyes (in an up-down pattern, which is unusual in sleep) to signal the researchers when they're having a lucid dream. Your eyes aren't paralyzed like the rest of you when you're dreaming, which is why that can work. They were successful at it. So technically we can actually communicate information while we're dreaming.

It might seem like an odd quirk of the way our brains work, but it's actually rather a useful technique to learn for people who have repetitive nightmares. It's helped me. The other night I was having one of mine, and I realized it was a dream, so I just walked away from the whole annoying scenario.


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Verdandi
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10 Apr 2014, 8:03 pm

Callista wrote:

It might seem like an odd quirk of the way our brains work, but it's actually rather a useful technique to learn for people who have repetitive nightmares. It's helped me. The other night I was having one of mine, and I realized it was a dream, so I just walked away from the whole annoying scenario.


Yeah, I've done this. I haven't had real many real nightmares since.

Except that one time I dreamt I was banned from a forum. Horrific.

That sounds like a joke but it's true.

The dream was one of those "being chased by something" dreams. I realized that I was running more slowly than I could walk, so I walked away from the situation and looked back. The horrifying beast that had been pursuing me was like a foot tall and running in very slow motion.

After that, most dreams that are nightmarish either don't bother me (because I know they're not real, even if they're complex - and many are) or I am able to defuse them and make them into something else.



Sylvastor
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10 Apr 2014, 8:48 pm

I learned to lucid dream.
Up until two years ago I didn't know that when you became aware of dreaming you could control it and started to practice that with several methods (doing WILD, reality checks, etc.).

So while I might have been aware of dreaming a few times before as a child, I didn't do anything at all with those dreams, noone told me I could influence them. I didn't even know it's called lucid dreaming. When I found out all one can do with it and "what they are", I turned it into a "very tiny hobby". :lol:
I have lucid dreams more often now (or rather remember them more often) and can at least do something with those. :D
I had my last lucid dream this night even. It was about a library, didn't mind changing anything about a setting as I love libraries, it was fun (the weird books especially) which was accompanied with a nice calm "radio dream music" (for some reasons the library had speakers in the ceiling, like supermarkets). :lol:

My dreams are usually quite vivid (well, in most cases, not everytime).


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yournamehere
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10 Apr 2014, 9:17 pm

I have already come to the conclusion that autistics do this way more than the norm. It is not listed as an attribute of any kind for autistics, and I do not know why.



neobluex
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10 Apr 2014, 9:30 pm

I don't exactly control my dreams.

Sometimes I'm aware that I'm dreaming and I comment on the dream and I can choose between "Continue simulation" or "Get up and go to pee" :P



JSBACHlover
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10 Apr 2014, 9:32 pm

There is no evidence for any connection between lucid dreaming and Asperger's. NTs have lucid dreams as well.



yournamehere
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10 Apr 2014, 9:43 pm

JSBACHlover wrote:
There is no evidence for any connection between lucid dreaming and Asperger's. NTs have lucid dreams as well.


Apparently, the norm is about 20%. The rest may have only one in a lifetime. I'm pritty sure there are more than that here.



auntblabby
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10 Apr 2014, 10:12 pm

wish I could do it. I read that ability to lucid dream is closely linked to ability to be hypnotized. I cannot be hypnotized either.



yournamehere
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10 Apr 2014, 10:26 pm

auntblabby wrote:
wish I could do it. I read that ability to lucid dream is closely linked to ability to be hypnotized. I cannot be hypnotized either.


I cannot be hypnotized, as far as I know. Some tried, it didn't work.

Your brain frequency is actually closer to a waking frequency. The deeper the sleep, the lower the Hz.

Think about an action, object, before you go to sleep. Looking at your hands, turning on a lightswitch, etc. Whatever you like. Perform the action, object thinking before you sleep. When it happens in your dream, you remember, and become conscious of it. Hence lucid dreaming. It is natural for me, and just did it when I took a nap today :)



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10 Apr 2014, 10:35 pm

yournamehere wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
wish I could do it. I read that ability to lucid dream is closely linked to ability to be hypnotized. I cannot be hypnotized either.


I cannot be hypnotized, as far as I know. Some tried, it didn't work.

Your brain frequency is actually closer to a waking frequency. The deeper the sleep, the lower the Hz.

Think about an action, object, before you go to sleep. Looking at your hands, turning on a lightswitch, etc. Whatever you like. Perform the action, object thinking before you sleep. When it happens in your dream, you remember, and become conscious of it. Hence lucid dreaming. It is natural for me, and just did it when I took a nap today :)

I guess I lack the mental discipline to be able to do that before just falling asleep, lord knows I've tried on multiple occasions, but sleep overtakes me and the next thing I know I awaken in the morning no better off in terms of having lucid dreams. darn.



Lumi
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10 Apr 2014, 10:43 pm

yes sometimes


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Soham
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10 Apr 2014, 11:47 pm

JSBACHlover wrote:
There is no evidence for any connection between lucid dreaming and Asperger's. NTs have lucid dreams as well.



I know "NTs" can and do lucid dream. I was just wondering if it is something that's more prevalent among those on the spectrum, in regards to how often they happen, or how easy it is to induce a lucid dream.