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zer0netgain
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21 Apr 2014, 5:26 pm

auntblabby wrote:
and I'm sure it keeps the Klingons away as well.


NICE. :lol:

And true.... :wink:



naturalplastic
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21 Apr 2014, 7:35 pm

Well...strictly speaking its not Uranus that youre shaving, but the two moons.

Correct?



auntblabby
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21 Apr 2014, 7:46 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
Well...strictly speaking its not Uranus that youre shaving, but the two moons.

Correct?

the two moons of Uranus and the rings of uranus



mr_bigmouth_502
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21 Apr 2014, 9:05 pm

Even if it were possible or practical, who in their right mind would want to terraform Neptune? It would be like taking Moraine Lake and paving over it to make a parking lot. It would be destroying something beautiful, natural, unique and irreplaceable.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moraine_Lake



auntblabby
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21 Apr 2014, 9:11 pm

mr_bigmouth_502 wrote:
Even if it were possible or practical, who in their right mind would want to terraform Neptune? It would be like taking Moraine Lake and paving over it to make a parking lot. It would be destroying something beautiful, natural, unique and irreplaceable.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moraine_Lake

what humans have been chompin' at the bit to do since time immemorial.



ScrewyWabbit
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23 Apr 2014, 3:29 pm

Sethno wrote:
Why not aim for terraforming Mars? They say if you generate greenhouse gases, including CO2, then add plants, you'll end up with an atmosphere with enough oxygen to keep people happy.


Lack of temperature, plus the fact that mars doesn't have enough gravity to maintain a thick atmosphere (all evidence suggests that mars had a thicker atmosphere then lost it).



ruveyn
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23 Apr 2014, 3:41 pm

ScrewyWabbit wrote:
Sethno wrote:
Why not aim for terraforming Mars? They say if you generate greenhouse gases, including CO2, then add plants, you'll end up with an atmosphere with enough oxygen to keep people happy.


Lack of temperature, plus the fact that mars doesn't have enough gravity to maintain a thick atmosphere (all evidence suggests that mars had a thicker atmosphere then lost it).


Not only light gravity, but no magnetic field to disperse high energy charged particles coming from the sun. Even if we put an atmosphere on Mars it would not last very long.

ruveyn



Sethno
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24 Apr 2014, 12:19 pm

ruveyn wrote:
Not a chance. It is too cold out there.

ruveyn


Are you talking about Uranus and Neptune, or Mars?



Sethno
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24 Apr 2014, 12:26 pm

auntblabby wrote:
...ozone layer is also required for relatively fragile advanced life forms to survive above ground.


That too. I figured that'd be achieved along with the atmosphere you can breathe being put in place.

Sort of stupid to make the atmosphere a pressure and content match for Earth's, but due to no ozone layer or magnetic field, you still have to live (and stay) underground.

Would a series of satelites be able to somehow generate a magnetic field powerful enough to provide protection, or would that much magnetic force wipe out the satellites that are generating it? (And no, I have no idea how a satellite would contribute to a magnetic field anyway.)

Despite Earth's field, there are man-made satellites, but they're not radiating magnetic forces.




...Or, are they? :p


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Sethno
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24 Apr 2014, 12:36 pm

ruveyn wrote:
ScrewyWabbit wrote:
Sethno wrote:
Why not aim for terraforming Mars? They say if you generate greenhouse gases, including CO2, then add plants, you'll end up with an atmosphere with enough oxygen to keep people happy.


Lack of temperature, plus the fact that mars doesn't have enough gravity to maintain a thick atmosphere (all evidence suggests that mars had a thicker atmosphere then lost it).


Not only light gravity, but no magnetic field to disperse high energy charged particles coming from the sun. Even if we put an atmosphere on Mars it would not last very long.

ruveyn




Nice replies, but my original post went on to mention the lack of a magnetic field.

As for the lighter gravity, I saw a show on the Discovery Channle of maybe the Science Channel that addressed the whole subject, and plainly said that within 100,000 years, the terraforming efforts would be undone by the atmosphere drifting away again.

Thing is, it's believed that part of the reason for it happening the first time was the lack of protection from the solar winds, that THEY ripped the atmosphere away. If the problem of establishing a field was successfully dealt with, the erosion of the new atmosphere would be slowed down quite a bit, if not stopped all together.



auntblabby
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24 Apr 2014, 12:44 pm

interesting that the two other planets on either end of the goldilocks zone, have either too much atmosphere or too little.



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24 Apr 2014, 3:33 pm

A sufficient ozone layer will develop with only a few hundred microbars of oxygen in the atmosphere. That would come within a few years of introducing plants, even without the effects of water dissociation.


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auntblabby
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24 Apr 2014, 3:37 pm

Magneto wrote:
A sufficient ozone layer will develop with only a few hundred microbars of oxygen in the atmosphere. That would come within a few years of introducing plants, even without the effects of water dissociation.

as long as proper magnetosphere is introduced the atmosphere should stick around. sans that, it is hopeless.



mr_bigmouth_502
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24 Apr 2014, 3:39 pm

OK, but how would we strengthen Mars' magnetic field so that it can block out radiation?



auntblabby
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24 Apr 2014, 3:46 pm

mr_bigmouth_502 wrote:
OK, but how would we strengthen Mars' magnetic field so that it can block out radiation?

might not be possible with any conceivable technology, as it would involve rebuilding Mars so that it had a substantially mobile magnetic metallic core. according to Tim Sharp at Space.com, Mars' center probably has a solid core composed of iron, nickel, and sulfur of roughly 1,800-2,400 miles in diameter. The core is immobile, and so Mars has no magnetic field. Without the shield of a magnetic field, radiation bombards the planet making it relatively hostile a place compared to Earth.



mr_bigmouth_502
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24 Apr 2014, 6:15 pm

auntblabby wrote:
mr_bigmouth_502 wrote:
OK, but how would we strengthen Mars' magnetic field so that it can block out radiation?

might not be possible with any conceivable technology, as it would involve rebuilding Mars so that it had a substantially mobile magnetic metallic core. according to Tim Sharp at Space.com, Mars' center probably has a solid core composed of iron, nickel, and sulfur of roughly 1,800-2,400 miles in diameter. The core is immobile, and so Mars has no magnetic field. Without the shield of a magnetic field, radiation bombards the planet making it relatively hostile a place compared to Earth.


Couldn't we build an external one, like an exoskeleton of sorts? I was thinking maybe they could start out making a relatively small "habitable zone", then they could spread out from there. Like the way I'm thinking of it, you could put up some radiation-hardened towers, and find some way to generate a magnetic field between the towers, then put your bases or whatever in the middle surrounded by the towers.