How to tell my parents that I might be an aspie?

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kraftiekortie
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29 May 2014, 7:58 pm

History is wonderful; one must learn from the past, in all its phases, in order to achieve success.

If one doesn't learn from history, the present is invariably dull, and the future is even duller, since nothing was learned in the present (which is the future's "past")

What type of history do you enjoy? I'm an American, but I enjoy British history. My "special interest" is the 1381 Peasants' Rebellion. In order to really be a scholar in that, though, one has to learn Middle English. Middle English, to me, is a cross between German and Modern English. Old English, to me, is basically a dialect of German.

I wonder if you would enjoy reading "The Canterbury Tales" by Geoffrey Chaucer (in Modern English translation)? I think this is a great, great work of art.

Why did your history teacher frighten you when you were nine? I would guess, based on what you wrote, that you were frightened of his knowledge. Am I right? Or was it something else?

It sounds like you have a good friend. Gentle teasing is always good. Tease her as well!

You could use her confidence to your advantage; she could use your intelligence to her advantage.



kraftiekortie
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30 May 2014, 8:01 am

I know of two kids your age within this Forum

One of them is named EzraS. He's 13. He's had quite an "autistic" past, but is really coming around in a lot of ways. He seems like a good lad.

Another is named Serenaserenaserena. She's also 13. She needs a friend, I believe.



SomeoneNew
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30 May 2014, 8:39 am

I am interested in Middle Ages, especially in Great Britain. I think I am obsessed with William the Conqueror a tad too much. I also love the Victorian Era, and the periods during which the people suffered from different plagues and such(however strange that is). Yellow Fever and the 1348's Black Death are the ones I am most interested in.

I like learning new languages, but the language I want to learn most right now is Latin. So many things were documented in Latin, but I guess French will do for now. The Nobles in Middle Ages spoke and wrote French, so I am not losing anything here.

As for my first history teacher, no, it wasn't the knowledge. She was very strict and demanding, and she set actual deadlines. I always thought of deadlines as a flexible thing before then. And she would ask us to read and memorise three pages of a certain topic(sometimes, it was two) before actually explaining it. All we did in class was read, and if we were lucky, she would talk and explain something for about ten minutes. I could never sit through her lesson, which was probably the reason she despised me so much. I started skipping her lessons after she drove me to tears with her not-so-needed lecture about my needing to respect her. It was awful.



kraftiekortie
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30 May 2014, 8:49 am

As you probably know, the French in the Middle Ages was somewhat different to present-day French. It was also the Norman dialect of French, which might have been quite different from the French spoken elsewhere.

I bet you would be thrilled to read the Domesday Book!

I believe you should also study something called "Legal French." This might be even more useful than studying French itself, since legal documents, until around Edward III's time, were rendered in Legal/Middle French (or in Latin).

After about 1377 or so, most governmental documents were written in Middle English--sometimes standard, sometimes dialectal.

There was still a lot of Latin used for many things.

The English language, to me, is difficult to understand until one reaches the Restoration period (about 1660). Modern English started about Henry VIII's time.

Most of the scholarly works in the Middle Ages were written in Latin. If you want to be a medieval scholar, Latin is indispensable.



kraftiekortie
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31 May 2014, 7:21 am

I know what you mean, SomeoneNew.

That teacher probably had her own problems, and took it out on you.