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AllisonWonderland
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24 May 2016, 12:37 pm

Sweden: Like if someone has a cold they'd only be allowed to take x number of days even if they're still sick? That's dumb.

Clones: Have you seen Orphan Black? It's an amazing show about clones. They all have very different personalities and issues even though they are genetically identical.



underwater
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24 May 2016, 12:52 pm

AllisonWonderland wrote:
Sweden: Like if someone has a cold they'd only be allowed to take x number of days even if they're still sick? That's dumb.


In a word: Yes. Yeah, it's a recipe for disaster. I wonder how many more bureaucrats they'll have to hire to deal with the inevitable problems.

AllisonWonderland wrote:
Clones: Have you seen Orphan Black? It's an amazing show about clones. They all have very different personalities and issues even though they are genetically identical.


Just googled the show, it seems really cool. If you're interested in cloning, there is a fantastic science fiction book by C.J. Cherryh called Cyteen, a sequel to Downbelow Station. It's really wonderful, and deals with the question of how much out personality is influenced by genes and life experience.



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24 May 2016, 4:35 pm

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I just read some newspaper story about a study of autistic genes, which claimed that there is no cutoff point, no clear demarcation between autistic and non-autistic. If so, the defining question is the same as for every mental illness; does it interfere with normal life and happiness or not? Which means that life circumstances and health will be a big factor for people near the cutoff point.

Also, I see one really useful thing about the Asperger's diagnosis. It is not possible for every NT in the world to become and expert autism and its many ways. If "Aspergers" is shorthand for "troubled, but probably able to hold down a job", it is hardly scientific, but a very useful label to keep from being shunted out of working life by people who think you are Rain Man if you say you are autistic. Or who doubt your autism because you seem too NT.

I think this makes a lot of sense: to treat whatever gets in the way of health and quality of life. As long as labels, or the lack thereof, don't stand in the way. I'm glad to see they don't matter on the forum, anyway.

Also, any lay term that enhances understanding is a good thing IMHO.

AllisonWonderland, what you say makes sense also. I didn't know that's how the SLP treated social issues in adults. I suppose the effectiveness depends on how good the assessment is, as well as the intuition and creativity of the client and therapist together.



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24 May 2016, 4:38 pm

Uncle wrote:
...stimming could be anything, like leg bouncing, or even pacing,or a squishy ball in the hand, or a bunch of car keys, or stroking your lip because it feels silky smooth, staring at lights or fans, mouth movements like a yawn type movement, blinking etc I dont think these things result in severely impeding on activities, if anything they would often help someone on the spectrum concentrate more.

When you put it that way, I use variations of these behaviors almost constantly to release pent up energy, and usually, nobody cares because they aren't blatant. Perhaps the professionals don't care either.



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24 May 2016, 6:35 pm

DataB4 wrote:
Uncle wrote:
...stimming could be anything, like leg bouncing, or even pacing,or a squishy ball in the hand, or a bunch of car keys, or stroking your lip because it feels silky smooth, staring at lights or fans, mouth movements like a yawn type movement, blinking etc I dont think these things result in severely impeding on activities, if anything they would often help someone on the spectrum concentrate more.

When you put it that way, I use variations of these behaviors almost constantly to release pent up energy, and usually, nobody cares because they aren't blatant. Perhaps the professionals don't care either.

Everyone does this, literally most people I know do these behaviours, the difference between autistic stim and non autistic stim is that autistics depend on the stim as an anchor and a way to cope in a over stimulating environment. If you NEED to stim in public then it's a autistic stim, if it's just something you do and don't realize you do it then it's not an autistic stim.


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24 May 2016, 6:47 pm

ZombieBrideXD, I'm doing all these different behaviors to cope with my own internal emotions, not necessarily the environment. I feel like I need to move somehow or to touch my face or hair in a calming way. I've learned to do things people either don't ynotice most of the time, or don't react to. Most people call him "nervous habits," and hat's one of those good-enough, catch-all terms.



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24 May 2016, 11:00 pm

DataB4 wrote:
ZombieBrideXD, I'm doing all these different behaviors to cope with my own internal emotions, not necessarily the environment. I feel like I need to move somehow or to touch my face or hair in a calming way. I've learned to do things people either don't ynotice most of the time, or don't react to. Most people call him "nervous habits," and hat's one of those good-enough, catch-all terms.


If there's a dependency on it then it still qualified as a stim. Have you ever thought that the environment might play a role in your emotional state?

If it's anxiety that's the cause though instead of a stim it sounds more like a nervous tic, my sister has social anxiety and chews on the inside of her cheek, it calms her and she depends on it.


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Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 170 of 200
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You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


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25 May 2016, 1:04 am

ZombieBrideXD wrote:
DataB4 wrote:
ZombieBrideXD, I'm doing all these different behaviors to cope with my own internal emotions, not necessarily the environment. I feel like I need to move somehow or to touch my face or hair in a calming way. I've learned to do things people either don't ynotice most of the time, or don't react to. Most people call him "nervous habits," and hat's one of those good-enough, catch-all terms.


If there's a dependency on it then it still qualified as a stim. Have you ever thought that the environment might play a role in your emotional state?

If it's anxiety that's the cause though instead of a stim it sounds more like a nervous tic, my sister has social anxiety and chews on the inside of her cheek, it calms her and she depends on it.



Chewing on the cheek is also been connected through the psychiatrist community and doctor community as been connected with stimming, again i think it ties in with ""Spectrum"", as those that were classed as Aspergers before (and still are under the ICD). May not excessively stim in the same way as others on the spectrum but get similar relief... This is why my view is that Aspergers should have been kept separate from autism itself, as studies have shown under new magnetic scanning, that the same areas of the brain are different from normal NT's similar to that of Austism, the excessive brain activity is similar to autism, but they have found it is also different. Its a topic that i think needs more research before people with financial and political interests decide to constantly swap and change decisions!



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25 May 2016, 1:32 am

Uncle wrote:
This is why my view is that Aspergers should have been kept separate from autism itself, as studies have shown under new magnetic scanning, that the same areas of the brain are different from normal NT's similar to that of Austism, the excessive brain activity is similar to autism, but they have found it is also different. Its a topic that i think needs more research before people with financial and political interests decide to constantly swap and change decisions!


Yes, the average person with aspergers is very different from the average person with autistic disorder...the issue is that there is huge diversity in EITHER disorder, not just between the two, and for many people were arbitrarily diagnosed with one of the other. So the people decided it would be better to just lump all autism spectrum together than try to split it into different subtypes for now, as we don't know HOW to split it into different subtypes.


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25 May 2016, 2:14 am

When I told my mother they got rid of the word Asperger's for a diagnoses and made it all autism spectrum disorder, she didn't like the idea. She thinks they're both different from each other. Then she wanted to see the new DSM so I told her she can go to a library and look at it, they might have the book there. People still disagree with the change because they don't like the lumping. I can see their point because Asperger's just describes where at on the spectrum someone is and how severe their traits are or mild. It's like how we have different names for the color purple like violet, maroon, and I have seen different orange colors with different names and then we have different names of dog breeds and cat breeds so just imagine if we got rid of all those labels and made it all cat and dog and orange and purple.


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25 May 2016, 2:24 am

Ganondox wrote:
Yes, the average person with aspergers is very different from the average person with autistic disorder...the issue is that there is huge diversity in EITHER disorder, not just between the two, and for many people were arbitrarily diagnosed with one of the other.

How are is the average person with autistic disorder "very different"?


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25 May 2016, 2:36 am

Lumi wrote:
Ganondox wrote:
Yes, the average person with aspergers is very different from the average person with autistic disorder...the issue is that there is huge diversity in EITHER disorder, not just between the two, and for many people were arbitrarily diagnosed with one of the other.

How are is the average person with autistic disorder "very different"?


Average meaning statistical average. For one, aspergers is artificially boosted when it comes to IQ by cutting out anyone with intellectual disabilities.


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25 May 2016, 3:35 am

Its an interesting topic where no-one is either right or wrong, the main issues i have asre how DSM diverted from their normal aproach of following the ICD and creating their own diagnostic ideologies that counteract ICD, as mentioned for example, SCD is not acknowledged as such by ICD, but when a diagnosis is done through DSM the doctor has to use the ICD codes, of which SCD does not have within the ICD criteria ( out of the 68,000 codes the ICD does have) So parents are falling through the cracks with their children because theres no code reference, no support or insurance cover. I still think it was a financial decision personally looking at all the evidence aswell as a key member of the DSM committee quiting because he felt new decisions were politically and financially motivated. DSM is for profit ( ie selling their ""Bibles"" at a ridiculous price for psychiatrists and doctors) where as ICD is purely run on donations and funding from other sources, as with anything unfortunately when money is involved. The idea is removed from what should be morally and factually right to what their bank balances hold.



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25 May 2016, 8:08 am

ZombieBrideXD wrote:
DataB4 wrote:
ZombieBrideXD, I'm doing all these different behaviors to cope with my own internal emotions, not necessarily the environment. I feel like I need to move somehow or to touch my face or hair in a calming way. I've learned to do things people either don't notice most of the time, or don't react to. Most people call them "nervous habits," and that's one of those good-enough, catch-all terms.


If there's a dependency on it then it still qualified as a stim. Have you ever thought that the environment might play a role in your emotional state?

If it's anxiety that's the cause though instead of a stim it sounds more like a nervous tic, my sister has social anxiety and chews on the inside of her cheek, it calms her and she depends on it.

Depends on how you define "environment." Not the sensory environment, though, unless you count all the times I jump at loud noises, like a barking dog or a ringing phone right next to me. I also feel like sometimes, it's worse if I'm relaxed because I'm not primed for the adrenaline surge. Either way, I can relate to what you're saying. :)


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25 May 2016, 8:34 am

I thought I was dealing with social anxiety until I started noticing that I would be cool as a cucumber on most rainy days, yet jumpy and anxious after a few days of bright sun. The fear of people being mean to me came as a direct result of my eyes bothering me so much that I felt unable to pay attention to what was going on around me. That's when I started researching, because I thought the whole thing was too weird.