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Swiper
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18 Sep 2014, 5:22 pm

Anyone here currently serving in the military?

I'm a senior NCO and currently pending an official diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (Aspergers). I managed to survive basic training and I flourished for 15 years doing a highly technical and strictly regulated job without any leaderships positions. It was a very stable environment with no surprises (same procedure as always). Last year I got promoted, assigned to a high profile but dysfunctional office, and put in leadership position. Needless to say, I cracked under the anxiety and had to seek help from mental health for the first time in my life. I always wondered what was wrong with me, but I never knew that I had Aspergers. I'm now trying to figure out where to go from here.

I would love to hear if anyone else here have a similar story.



Last edited by Swiper on 18 Sep 2014, 5:54 pm, edited 2 times in total.

LokiofSassgard
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18 Sep 2014, 5:29 pm

I've never served in the military, but my dad has. He is a Vietnam Veteran. :3 I've had an ex who was in ROTC as well, but I've never really thought of joining because it'd be too hard on my anxiety. :( I do honor those with AS or other disorders who serve us because it takes a lot of guts to do it if you have a lot of issues.


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Currently diagnosed with Autistic Disorder, ADHD, severe anxiety, learning delays and developmental delays.


L_Holmes
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18 Sep 2014, 5:41 pm

I was in Air Force ROTC for a year in college, but that's when my depression and anxiety got to me. Due my grades I would have been kicked from the program, so I decided to opt out before that happened so it wouldn't be on my record. I did like the structure of it, but to be honest I wasn't that into it in the first place.


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dilanger
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18 Sep 2014, 7:45 pm

Former Army

UAV operator was in Operation New Dawn in Iraq



Danimal
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19 Sep 2014, 1:44 am

I am a retired officer. I was an E-1 in basic training. How I passed is still a mystery. Once I adapted to Army life, I actually flourished in a regimented atmosphere. I moved in and out from active duty to the National Guard and Army Reserve.
I didn't have too much difficulty with leadership positions. I really learned leadership skills in ROTC.
I wasn't diagnosed until several years after my retirement. It explained much about my behavior. For example, when I lived in the barracks in Germany, the noise and my roommates would become overwhelming. I would escape to the countryside either with a long run or a bike ride. Once I decompressed I could return. Sometimes I turned to alcohol, which wasn't a very good coping mechanism.



XFilesGeek
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19 Sep 2014, 8:01 am

U.S. Air Force for 8 years.

Aircraft mechanic.

Currently a civilian.


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19 Sep 2014, 9:00 pm

I was in the Army for seven years, and Army Reserve for one year. I was a mechanic in aviation. I would have stayed in longer but I started having trouble working after a head injury.

I loved the military structure, constant training in new things, the technical and hands on aspects, physical training.

I didn't like the office politics and social manipulating in some workplaces. Also sensory issues got in my way at times, mainly strong smells and strong sounds (large amounts of cigarette smoke, some paints and solvents I worked with, chronic loud music in the barracks).

Back then I had no clue I was autistic, but I wondered why I was so different, mainly because of my sensory issues, but also because I could tell that my brain thinks a heck of a lot differently from most people I had ever met.